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Constitutional and Public Law

Feature Story

The Duke D.C. Summer Institute on Law and Policy

Building upon its premier public law faculty, Duke Law School will offer short courses taught by Duke Law faculty to college and graduate students as well as professionals working in the nation’s capital at the Summer Institute on Law
and Policy.

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Duke in D.C.

Duke Law sticker held over Washington Monument

Duke in D.C. gives students who are interested in public policy, public service, and careers in the public sector an opportunity to study federal policymaking firsthand, under the direction of Duke Law faculty and practitioners. The program has three components: a semester-long externship placement in a congressional or policymaking office; a weekly course taught by Duke Law faculty; and a substantial research project. Through this integrated approach, students deepen their analytical skills, become creative and constructive decision-makers, and learn to work collaboratively and across disciplines.

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Faculty
  • Margaret Lemos
    Professor of Law

    Lemos is a scholar of constitutional law, legal institutions, and procedure.  Her scholarship focuses on the institutions of law interpretation and enforcement and their effects on substantive rights. She writes in four related fields: federalism; administrative law, including the relationship between courts and agencies; statutory interpretation; and civil procedure. Her articles have been published in the Supreme Court Review as well as in the Harvard, New York University, Texas, Minnesota, Vanderbilt, and Notre Dame law reviews.

Video
  • Hobby Lobby, Healthcare, and Religious Expression

    As the U.S. Supreme Court prepared for arguments on whether for-profit corporations and their owners may claim religious freedom exceptions from provisions of the Affordable Care Act, Duke Law professors Darrell Miller, Barak Richman, Neil Siegel, Ernie Young, and Kate Bartlett participated in a lunchtime panel discussion on the implications for constitutional law and public policy. The cases raise important questions about constitutional law, healthcare policy, the corporate form, statutory construction, and the ability of Congress to protect constitutional norms. Sponsored by Duke Law's Program in Public Law.

  • Currie Lecture 2014 | Samuel Issacharoff, Ballot Bedlam

    North Carolina's ongoing battles over ballot access are a window into the current malaise that plagues America's electoral system. Amid the debates about vote fraud and vote suppression, about race and politics, about abuse and integrity, lie deeper questions about how the U.S. has structured its democracy. Recent Supreme Court decisions provide new clues to the complicated interrelation between law, the Constitution, race and politics. Samuel Issacharoff, the Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law at New York University School of Law, addressed the intersection of these fraught areas of American law and politics during Duke Law's annual Currie Lecture. His wide-ranging research deals with issues in civil procedure, law and economics, constitutional law (particularly with regard to voting rights and electoral systems), and employment law.

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