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Constitutional and Public Law

Feature Story

Schroeder testifies before Senate Judiciary Committee regarding executive action on immigration

Professor Christopher Schroeder addressed the legality of the policies announced by Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Jeh Johnson that provide the possibility of deferred action and work authorization for undocumented aliens who meet specific criteria.

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Duke in D.C.

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Duke in D.C. gives students who are interested in public policy, public service, and careers in the public sector an opportunity to study federal policymaking firsthand, under the direction of Duke Law faculty and practitioners. The program has three components: a semester-long externship placement in a congressional or policymaking office; a weekly course taught by Duke Law faculty; and a substantial research project. Through this integrated approach, students deepen their analytical skills, become creative and constructive decision-makers, and learn to work collaboratively and across disciplines.

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Faculty
  • Margaret Lemos
    Professor of Law

    Lemos is a scholar of constitutional law, legal institutions, and procedure.  Her scholarship focuses on the institutions of law interpretation and enforcement and their effects on substantive rights. She writes in four related fields: federalism; administrative law, including the relationship between courts and agencies; statutory interpretation; and civil procedure. Her articles have been published in the Supreme Court Review as well as in the Harvard, New York University, Texas, Minnesota, Vanderbilt, and Notre Dame law reviews.

Video
  • LENS Conference 2015 | Public v. Private: Intrusive Cyberactivities in the Age of Forever War

    The 2015 LENS Conference, Law in the Age of 'Forever War', focuses on the legal issues that accompany warfare in a time when technology, relationships between nations, and the abilities of non-state actors to affect the international stage, are all changing rapidly. Speakers address some of the difficult issues that have come to define modern law as it relates to warfare: targeting, surveillance, home-grown terrorism, intelligence gathering in the digital age, ensuring human rights and civil liberties. Moderator: David Hoffman, Director of Security Policy & Global Privacy Officer, Intel Corporation Professor Christopher Schroeder, Charles S. Murphy Professor of Law and Public Policy Studies Co-Director of the Program in Public Law, Duke Law School Erin Wirtanen, Office of the General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency Greg Nojeim, Senior Counsel, Center for Democracy & Technology and Director of its Freedom, Security & Technology Project.

  • Does Congress Take the Constitution Seriously? A Constitution Day Conversation

    Do Members of Congress take the U.S. Constitution seriously? Do they attempt to shape their actions to what the Constitution says? Do they instead shape what the Constitution says so that it supports their actions (and condemns the actions of their opponents)? Or do they largely disregard the Constitution? Duke professors Chris Schroeder and Neil Siegel and UNC professor Michael Gerhardt discuss these questions from both an historical and a contemporary perspective. They also address the potential role of judicial review in bringing about the current state of affairs. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law.

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