Course Information

Course Number

736

Credits

2

Area of Study & Practice

  • Family Property and Relations

JD Graduation Requirements

This course typically satisfies all or some of the following JD graduation requirements:
  • Writing

Advanced Issues in Children and Family Law

This seminar will focus on ideas and practices that push the boundaries of child abuse and neglect (maltreatment) law. We will begin with a history of the development of this law in the United States, focusing on shifting definitions of abuse and neglect based in political, cultural, and medical upheavals. We will then turn to traditional and progressive ideas and practices that push the boundaries of modern abuse and neglect law, including but not necessarily limited to religious exemptions to medical neglect, emancipation of minors, the treatment of neonates, cultural exceptions and defenses, the use of healthy minor children as organ "donors" for their ill siblings, and pediatric research using healthy child subjects. Enrolled students will be required to attend class prepared to participate and to write a final paper analyzing an issue related to the subject-matter of the course.


Please note that course organization and content may vary substantially from semester to semester and descriptions are not necessarily professor specific. Please contact the instructor directly if you have particular course-related questions.

Prerequisite Information

There are no pre-requisites for this course.

Sections/Instructors

Doriane Lambelet Coleman
Advanced Issues in Children and Family Law 736.01
Spring 2012
E-mail ListSakai Site

Doriane Lambelet Coleman
Advanced Issues in Children and Family Law 736.01
Fall 2009
E-mail List

Doriane Lambelet Coleman
Advanced Issues in Children and Family Law 736.01
Fall 2007
E-mail ListBlackboard Site

In the fall 2007 semester, this seminar will focus on ideas and practices that push the boundaries of child abuse and neglect (maltreatment) law. We will begin with a history of the development of this law in the United States, focusing on shifting definitions of abuse and neglect based in political, cultural, and medical upheavals. We will then turn to traditional and progressive ideas and practices that push the boundaries of modern abuse and neglect law, including but not necessarily limited to religious exemptions to medical neglect, emancipation of minors, the treatment of neonates, cultural exceptions and defenses, the use of healthy minor children as organ "donors" for their ill siblings, and pediatric research using healthy child subjects. Enrolled students will be required to attend class prepared to participate and to write a final paper analyzing an issue related to the subject-matter of the course.

Doriane Lambelet Coleman
Advanced Issues in Children and Family Law 736.01
Spring 2005