Rachel Brewster

Professor of Law


Rachel Brewster’s scholarly research and teaching focus on the areas of international economic law and international relations theory.  She came to Duke Law in July 2012 from Harvard University where she was an assistant professor of law and affiliate faculty member of The Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. Brewster serves as co-director of Duke’s Center for International and Comparative Law.

Prior to joining the Harvard law faculty in 2006, Brewster served as a Bigelow Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School and clerked for Judge Phyllis A. Kravitch of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.  She served as legal counsel in the Office of the United States Trade Representative in 2008.

Brewster’s recent and forthcoming publications include: “The Remedy Gap: Institutional Design, Retaliation, and Trade Law Enforcement” George Washington Law Review (forthcoming 2011); “Stepping Stone or Stumbling Block: Incrementalism and National Climate Change Legislation,” 28 Yale Law and Policy Review 245 (2010); “Shadow Unilateralism: Enforcing Trade Law at the WTO,” 30 University of Pennsylvania International Law Journal (2009); “The Limits of Reputation on Compliance,” 1 International Theory 323 (2009); and “Unpacking the State's Reputation,” 50 Harvard International Law Journal 231 (2009).

Brewster received her BA and JD from the University of Virginia, where she was articles editor for the Virginia Law Review. She holds a PhD in political science from the University of North Carolina — Chapel Hill, where she received the John Patrick Hagan Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.