Faculty News 2005

 

  • Justice to ferret out spy program leak
    December 31, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, tells The Associated Press that the Justice Department would be wrong to try to prosecute whoever divulged the existence of the Bush administration's secret domestic spying program.
  • Untested Aide Laid Legal Basis for White House Terror Policies
    December 23, 2005
    Richard and Marcy Horvitz Professor of Law Curtis Bradley comments to The New York Times on former administration lawyer John Yoo, saying that "in terms of war powers, you won't find many scholars who will go as far as he does."
  • $440 Million from Wall Street as Restitution
    December 22, 2005
    Professor Francis McGovern, the court-approved administrator of settlement funds, comments to The New York Times on the distribution of $440 million in restitution in the $1.4 billion global settlement over tainted research during the technology boom.
  • President ignores the Constitution
    December 22, 2005
    Writing in The San Diego Union Tribune and Durham's Herald-Sun, Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments on the Bush administration's claim that warrantless surveillance was necessary after 9/11.
  • Spy court judge often ripped post-Sept. 11 detentions
    December 22, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security comments to the San Jose Mercury News on the resignation of U.S. District Court Judge James Robertson's resignation from the FISA court in protest of the administration's warrantless spying, as well as on the judge's rulings regarding the Guantanamo Bay detainees.
  • Federal judge rules against "intelligent design"
    December 21, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The Los Angeles Times on a federal judge's ruling that intelligent design cannot be taught in schools as an alternative to the theory of evolution.
  • Judge resigns over secret surveillance
    December 21, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, comments to the Associated Press on the resignation of Judge Robertson from the FISA court in protest over the president's authorization of warrantless domestic surveillance. "It signifies that at least one member of the court believes the president has exceeded his legal authority," said Silliman.
  • Bush administration's defense
    December 20, 2005
    Professors Scott Silliman and Erwin Chemerinsky comment to Newsday on the Bush administration's claim of constitutional executive power or, alternatively, Congressional authority in its post 9-11 resolution, as a basis for the president's order to the National Security Agency to conduct warrantless domestic surveillance.
  • Former governor leads list of Greenberg allies
    December 20, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to International Herald Tribune on former American International Group CEO Maurice Greenberg's list of allies "with stature," whose support he says, helps reduce anxiety of those seeking do business with him while criminal investigations are ongoing.
  • President again cites war powers in latest flap over anti-terrorism efforts
    December 19, 2005
    Richard and Marcy Horvitz Professor of Law Curtis Bradley tells The Congressional Quarterly that the president may have violated the 1978 FISA Act in authorizing the National Security Agency to engage in warrantless surveillance, but notes that it may never be challenged in court.
  • Analysis: Impact of the anti-torture amendment
    December 16, 2005
    A guest on NPR's Morning Edition, Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, explains how the McCain amendment will affect U.S. policy on interrogation.
  • Bush Reportedly Approved Domestic Eavesdropping
    December 16, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Voice of America on initial disclosures that the president authorized the National Security Agency to engage in domestic eavesdropping, saying it failed to meet any constitutional requirements.
  • The Sunni Moment
    December 14, 2005
    Writing in The Wall Street Journal, James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science Donald Horowitz warns of a coming constitutional crisis in post-election Iraq. (Subscription required.)
  • Returning Enron Bonuses
    December 13, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to NPR's "Marketplace" (airing on NPR's "Day to Day") on a bankruptcy judge's order for Enron energy traders to return bonuses they received prior to the company's bankruptcy. The fact that workers, not investors, will receive the funds is unique, said Cox.
  • Just what do we mean by torture?
    December 11, 2005
    Writing in Durham's Herald-Sun, Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, calls on the U.S. to condemn cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment, as well as torture, wherever they are committed.
  • Military Campus Ban Facing Court Hit?
    December 7, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Durham's Herald-Sun on Rumsfeld v. Forum for Academic and Institutional Rights. Heard in the Supreme Court on December 6, the case involves a challenge the military's right to recruit on certain law school campuses, in protest of the Pentagon's policies regarding homosexuals.
  • An ineffective lawyer can turn out to be lethal
    December 6, 2005
    In op ed in The Newark Star Ledger, Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky writes of the necessity for defendants in capital cases to have competent trial counsel.  Also appeared in The Seattle Times http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/opinion/2002668591_chemerinsky07.html.
  • NYSE Set for New Era after Takeover Vote
    December 6, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to The Washington Post on a deal struck Tuesday by members of the New York Stock Exchange that turns the Exchange into a for-profit, publicly traded company.
  • The Laws of War:
    December 6, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, discusses the evolution of and current administration's approach to the laws of war in NPR.org's "Legal Affairs."
  • U.S. carries out 1,000th execution
    December 2, 2005
    Professor James Coleman comments to Reuters on the 1,000th execution in the United States since the death penalty as restored in 1977, saying that "if you were starting from scratch, my guess is nobody would think that the death penalty is a great idea."
  • Battle for board would be costly and carry risk
    December 1, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to The Financial Times on Carl Icahn's attempt to take control of the board of Time Warner.
  • Court Delay's Padilla's Transfer
    December 1, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, comments to The Toronto Star on the Fourth Circuit's request for more information before approving Jose Padilla's transfer from military to criminal custody.
  • Justices weigh parental notification law
    December 1, 2005
    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette covers Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky's November 30th argument in the U.S. Supreme Case in Scheidler v. National Organization of Women.
  • U.S. Supreme Court hears New Hampshire's Parental Notification Law
    December 1, 2005
    Professor Neil Siegel takes part in hour long discussion on Supreme Court's consideration of Ayotte v. Planned Parenthood of Northern New England on New Hampshire Public Radio's "The Exchange."
  • Precedent at Stake in Supreme Court Abortion Case
    November 30, 2005
    Professor Neil Siegel comments to Fox News on the significance of Ayotte v. Planned Parenthood of Northern New England; the Court is being asked to make it harder to challenge abortion statutes.

    See also The Buffalo News, "Confronting Roe Once Again." http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20051130/1035863.asp
  • Long term disasters for youth
    November 28, 2005
    In News and Observer op ed Clinical Professor of Law Jane Wettach, director of the Children's Education Law Clinic, argues that mandated year-long suspensions for fighting, which disproportionately affect African American and Latino students, are more likely to encourage anti-social behavior than prevent it and in fact create a "school-to-prison pipeline."
  • The stage is set
    November 28, 2005
    Professor Neil Siegel comments to The Boston Globe on Ayotte v. Planned Parenthood of Northern New England, a case coming before the Supreme Court November 30. Siegel calls it a case of "monumental importance," as the Court is beings asked to change the way abortion laws are judged.
  • The State of Things
    November 28, 2005
    Professor Richard Schmalbeck takes part in hour long discussion on North Carolina Public Radio's "The State of Things" of the tax exempt status of churches that are politically active. The IRS is apparently investigating approximately 20 churches for possible violations of the tax code provisions that grant them non-profit status.
  • Dirty Bomb Suspect Jose Padilla Indicted
    November 22, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, comments to The Associated Press on the criminal indictment of Jose Padilla, an American citizen held for three years in military without charge on suspicion of planning to detonate a "dirty bomb."
  • Duke Law School gets Nixon Watergate Tapes Letter
    November 21, 2005
    Durham Herald-Sun covers Duke Law School program recalling the confrontation between Judge John Sirica and President Richard Nixon '37 over the issue of executive privilege; John Sirica, Jr., donated the letter the President sent to his father outlining his stance to the Law Library. Charles S. Murphy Professor of Law Christopher Schroeder and Archibald C. and Frances Fulk Rufty Research Professor of Law Richard Danner are quoted.
  • Alito's record has feminists ready for battle
    November 20, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells the San Francisco Chronicle that while Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito has sided with plaintiffs in a few discrimination cases, overall, "when there are choices to be made, his tend to be against the victims of discrimination."
  • Students help defend detainees
    November 19, 2005
    News and Observer feature article focuses on work of Professor Madeline Morris and Duke Law students enrolled in the Law School's Guantanamo Defense Clinic.
  • Duke Law students aid in detainees' defense
    November 17, 2005
    Professor Madeline Morris and Dean Katharine Bartlett comment to Durham's Herald-Sun on the Law School's new Guantanamo Defense Clinic, which Morris directs and which involves students in legal defense of Guantanamo Bay detainees charged before military commissions.
  • Guantanamo Case Awaits High Court Ruling
    November 15, 2005
  • Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, speaking on NPR's "All Things Considered," says that while Congress gave the president wide latitude in the early stages of the war on terror, it was inevitable, following allegations of abuse at Abu Graib prison and long-term detentions at Guantanamo Bay, that Congress would get involved.
  • How Alito Looks Under the Lens
    November 14, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells Time that Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito has been consistently hostile to victims of discrimination in employment cases and others.
  • Smashed Mirror: Treating the unrest rattling France requires difficult reassessments of the nation and its society
    November 14, 2005
    Houston Chronicle editorial on French unrest cites article written by James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science Donald Horowitz. The article, on ethnicity in France, appeared in a French journal whose editor did not believe that ethnicity existed in his country.
  • For court, two central questions
    November 13, 2005
    Speaking to the Concord (NH) Monitor, Professor Neil Siegel calls "hugely important" an upcoming Supreme Court consideration of New Hampshire's parental notification laws in Ayotte v. Planned Parenthood of Northern New England, saying that it could involve cutbacks on abortion rights.
  • Senate may rethink detainee rights; Guantanamo measure immediately challenged
    November 12, 2005
    Calling "momentous" a Senate move to block Guantanamo detainees from challenging their detentions in federal court, Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, tells The Chicago Tribune/Knight Ridder that the Senate is "trying to reverse a Supreme Court case of great magnitude and scuttle another one."
  • Case Studied for Clues on Alito's Views of Federalism
    November 11, 2005
    Commenting on NPR's "All Things Considered," Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky says that Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito's views on the limits of federal power could threaten some basic rights protected by Congress.
  • Legal Affairs: A Survey Course on Alito Legal Views
    November 11, 2005
    How conservative is U.S. Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito? Professor Neil Siegel takes part in NPR "Legal Affiars" review of Judge Alito's record, looking at such issues as abortion and federalism.
  • Supreme Court to Hear Case on Military Tribunals
    November 9, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, is a guest on NPR's "Talk of the Nation" discussing the Supreme Court's decision to hear a challenge to the legitimacy of military tribunals on Guantanamo Bay, and whether or not the use of such tribunals to try foreign terror suspects is constitutional.
  • Court to Rule on Tribunals
    November 8, 2005
  • Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, tells The Associated Press that in deciding to hear a challenge to the Guantanamo Bay military tribunals in the case of Salim Ahmed Hamdan, the Supreme Court seemed to be saying that it would define the limits of executive power in the war on terrorism.
  • Professor Silliman comments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation on the significance of the Supreme Court decision and the future of military tribunals. http://www.cbc.ca/cp/world/051108/w1108110.html
  • Protests aren't race riots, expert says
    November 8, 2005
    James B. Duke Professor of Law and Professor of Political Science Donald Horowitz discusses the current violent unrest in France with The Globe and Mail, distinguishing the protests from ethnic or race riots.
  • A market for ideas
    November 3, 2005
    The Economist: Essay addresses question of whether today's "abundance of patents" hinders or spurs technological innovation, and cites William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law James Boyle's description of the current increase in intellectual property rights as a second "enclosure movement."
  • Alito Confirmation Battle Shapes Up
    November 2, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky takes part in Washingtonpost.com online Q and A regarding the nomination of Judge Samuel Alito to the Supreme Court.
  • Wall Street's Paying Up
    November 2, 2005
    Professor Francis McGovern, who is administering more than $440 million in global research settlement funds in claims against Wall Street financial institutions, comments to Forbes on the imminent distribution to investors.
  • Web's never-to-be-repeated revolution
    November 2, 2005
    In his regular FT.com column, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law James Boyle celebrates the 15th anniversary of the creation of the World Wide Web, but suggests that lawyers, policymakers, and copyright holders would fight its creation today.
  • Alito's view on abortion could set up showdown
    November 1, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells Durham's Herald-Sun that because he would step into Justice O'Connor's seat, Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito's views on such issues as abortion, separation of church and state, discrimination, and criminal procedure will be some of the most debated and scrutinized during the confirmation process.
  • Mr. Clean
    November 1, 2005
    Commenting to Corporate Counsel on KPMG's appointment of a former federal judge as chief legal officer--over its general counsel--partly in order to avoid prosecution for tax shelter fraud, David F. Cavers Professor of Law Deborah DeMott says that such an appointment of someone  with a reputation for honesty and integrity "signals to the market and the regulators that the company is ready to change its culture and practices."
  • Alito Has Affirmed Abortion Restrictions
    October 31, 2005
    Noting that as an appeals court judge Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito has held that states can require women seeking abortions to notify their spouses, Professor Neil Siegel tells The Associated Press that Alito will make a decisive difference on the court if confirmed, as there will certainly be other restrictions he would find tolerable.
  • Executive Privilege and the Withdrawal of Harriet Miers
    October 31, 2005
    Charles S. Murphy Professor of Law and Public Policy Studies Christopher Schroeder argues in Jurist column that senatorial requests for information pertaining to Harriet Miers' White House service could have been selectively accommodated without violating "executive privilege."
  • Ball dropped with Miers, conservatives say
    October 30, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells The Houston Chronicle that Harriet Miers' nomination to the Supreme Court may reflect the insularity of the Bush White House.
  • Special counsel enters the line of fire
    October 30, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The Houston Chronicle on attacks on Special Counsel Patrick Fitzgerald following the indictment of vice presidential aide Lewis "Scooter" Libby.
  • Is your BlackBerry in Danger?
    October 28, 2005
    Professor Arti Rai comments to NPR's "Marketplace" on a decision by U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts that could imperil the sale of BlackBerries in the United States.
  • Nominees may face law litmus test after Miers incident
    October 28, 2005
    Professor Stuart Benjamin tells The Winston-Salem Journal that future Supreme Court nominees will likely have to be highly distinguished lawyers, if not judges.
  • Reaction to Libby Indictments
    October 28, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to NPR about the indictment brought against I. Lewis Libby, the vice-president's former chief-of-staff, in the Valerie Plame case.
  • Privilege and secrecy and the struggle for documents
    October 27, 2005
    Charles S. Murphy Professor of Law and Public Policy Studies Christopher Schroeder comments on the Kojo Nnamdi Show,(WAMU-NPR affiliate), on the president's claim that to turn over documents authored by Harriet Miers in her capacity as head of the Office of Legal Counsel would chill his ability to seek and get candid advice. (Audio required.)
  • Padilla takes his case to the Supreme Court
    October 27, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security tells The Associated Press that the Supreme Court should hear the case of the "dirty bomb" suspect because it is a "vital case" to articulate the constitutional rights of an American citizen captured in the U.S.
  • Drawing lines for high court justices
    October 25, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky argues in favor of a Constitution that evolves through judicial interpretation in Duke University debate.
  • Do High Court Justices Need Term Limits?
    October 22, 2005
    Discussion on NPR's "Weekend Edition" focuses on different proposals for imposing term limits on Supreme Court justices, including one co-authored by Professor Paul Carrington.
  • Taking Issue: Americans Deserve Answers
    October 20, 2005
    In "Talking Points" editorial for NPR, Professor Neil Siegel calls for a bipartisan consensus that Supreme Court nominees must answer questions about their views on important legal issues to earn confirmation.
  • Local Experts: Saddam trial must be fair, all Iraqi
    October 18, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, tells Durham's Herald-Sun that the trial of Saddam Hussein must be perceived to be fair.
  • Free Ideas
    October 13, 2005
    The Economist reports on a charter for the future of intellectual property rights drawn up by "the Adelphi Group," an international consortium of scientists, artists, and legal scholars, including William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law James Boyle. The "Adelphi Charter" lays out a "public interest test" for lawmakers to use before changing intellectual property laws to better "maintain a balance between the realm of property and the realm of the public domain," according to Boyle.
  • 7 questions for a Supreme Court in transition
    October 6, 2005
    Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law Walter Dellinger discusses the role retiring Justice O'Connor will play in the current Supreme Court term, among other issues relating to the Court in transition on MSNBC.
  • High Court Clashes Over Assisted Suicide
    October 6, 2005
    Professor Neil Siegel comments to Associated Press on Chief Justice John Roberts' active participation during October 5 oral arguments in Gonzales v. Oregon.
  • Privacy issues likely to come before court
    October 6, 2005
    Professor Paul Carrington argues in favor of Supreme Court term limits to msnbc.com.
  • Senators must tell Miers: No answers, no confirmation
    October 6, 2005
    In Baltimore Sun op-ed, Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky calls on senators to deny Harriet Miers confirmation to the Supreme Court unless she answers detailed questions about her views.
  • Supreme Court to revisit assisted suicide
    October 5, 2005
    Professor Neil Siegel comments to The Associated Press on the issue of assisted suicide, predicting a close vote as the Supreme Court prepares to hear oral in Gonzales v. Oregon, a case involving Oregon's Death with Dignity statute.
  • Muslims Urged Not to Resist Antiterror Law
    October 4, 2005
    Attending a forum in Manilla organized by the Philippine Council for Islam and Democracy on "Issues and Trends in Terrorism Prosecution," Charles L. B. Lowndes Professor of Law Sara Beale tells the Philippine Daily Inquirer that antiterrorist legislation proposed by the Philippine government, while flawed, would make it easier to hold the government for any human rights violations in the war on terror; without legislation, investigators might "go around" the legal system.
  • Does intelligent design belong in public schools?
    October 3, 2005
    In a Q and A with Raleigh's News and Observer, Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky argues that a Pennsylvania school board's policy insisting that "Intelligent Design' theory be taught in high school biology classrooms violates the First Amendment.
  • Posse Comitatus Act can survive a storm
    September 30, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, writes in Raleigh's News and Observer that the Posse Comitatus Act would allow the military to take a broader role in disaster relief.
  • Roberts Sworn in as 17th Chief Justice
    September 29, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to KCBS Radio (Los Angeles) on the confirmation of John G. Roberts as Chief Justice and on the influence he will have on the Court.
  • 'Intelligent design' lawsuit has some looking at N.C. education
    September 27, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells WRAL News that 'intelligent design' is a version of creation science and, as such, is unconstitutional if taught in public schools.
  • Reno gives views on Waco, Cuban boy's return
    September 27, 2005
    Durham's Herald-Sun covers Walter B. Maggs Professor of Law Walter Dellinger's interview with former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, part of the Law School's "Great Lives in the Law" series.
  • James Boyle: More rights are wrong for webcasters
    September 26, 2005
    In his regular FT.com column, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law James Boyle laments international initiatives to extend broadcasters' intellectual property rights and to extend them to webcasts.
  • Roberts tap dances away
    September 22, 2005
    In an op-ed in Raleigh's News and Observer, Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky calls on Democratic senators to oppose John Roberts' confirmation as chief justice for his failure to answer their questions, and accuses the senators of failing to sufficiently press the nominee to articulate his views on issues on which his may be the deciding vote.
  • The corporate wish list for the U.S. top court
    September 22, 2005
    Financial Times column speculating as to Supreme Court nominee John Roberts' attitudes towards business cites unpublished study by Professor Catherine Fisk, in which she analyzed the labor and employment cases he decided as a federal appellate judge. She found that he decided in favor of the employer in all nine of them. (Subscription required for access to full article.)
  • Use of secrets at trial debated
    September 22, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, discusses with Raleigh's News and Observer attempts by former CIA contractor David Passaro to introduce classified information in his defense against assault charges in the death of a an Afghan detainee.
  • Power Tool
    September 19, 2005
    Drawing on his own experience in the Justice Department during the Clinton Administration, Professor H. Jefferson Powell discusses with The New Republic how John Roberts might view issues of presidential authority as chief justice. (Registration required.)
  • Duke lecturer backs nominee for chief justice
    September 16, 2005
    Durham Herald-Sun covers testimony of Senior Lecturing Fellow Kathryn Bradley before Senate Judiciary Committee in support of the confirmation of United States Chief Justice nominee John Roberts.
  • Gauging Bush's Use of Domestic Military
    September 16, 2005
    On NPR's "All Things Considered," Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, discusses the president's September 15th speech, which alluded to an expansion of military efforts in domestic problems. (Audio required.)
  • Flood victims and death penalty: there's a link
    September 12, 2005
    In an op-ed in Raleigh's News and Observer, Professor James Coleman, who chairs the ABA's Death Penalty Moratorium Implementation Project, makes a connection between the government's "disgraceful" response to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina and North Carolina's failure to declare a moratorium on executions.
  • Before voting on Roberts, insist on a second nominee
    September 7, 2005
    In Houston Chronicle op-ed, Professors James Coleman and Erwin Chemerinsky argue that Democrats must insist that the Senate not vote on John Roberts' confirmation as chief justice until after Justice O'Connor's successor is named, in order to assess their impact on the Supreme Court.
  • Roberts a safe pick for top job
    September 6, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells The Detroit News that the president's selection of John Roberts as Chief Justice changes the dynamics of the confirmation process without changing the balance of the Supreme Court.
  • Once again, just too conservative
    August 31, 2005
    In Los Angeles Times op-ed, Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky calls for Democrats to opposed the confirmation of John Roberts to the Supreme Court, saying that he would likely change the law dramatically in key areas such as privacy rights, separation of church and state, and racial justice.
  • Roberts v. The Future
    August 28, 2005
    In The New York Times Magazine, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law James Boyle discusses questions pertaining to the future that senators might ask Supreme Court nominee John Roberts, including questions about the patenting of human life.
  • Value of Roberts' memos questioned
    August 28, 2005
    Professor H. Jefferson Powell comments to Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on the revelatory value--or lack thereof--of memos John Roberts wrote as deputy chief solicitor general, noting that they would likely only offer professional judgements of arguments that would persuade the Court.
  • Judges do make law--it's their job
    August 24, 2005
    In a USA Today op-ed, Professors Catherine Fisk and Erwin Chemerinsky say that it is a Supreme Court justice's job to make law, and call misleading comments that John Roberts is a desireable nominee because he will "not legislate from the bench."
  • General lost his job over romance, his lawyers says
    August 11, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, comments to USA Today on the Pentagon's dismissal of a four-star Army general, and military law regarding adultery.
  • Mascot policy will be tough to overcome
    August 8, 2005
    Professor Paul Haagen comments to USA Today on the NCAA's new policy restricting the use of American Indian mascots and imagery.
  • Privacy Views: Roberts argued Hard for Others
    August 8, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The New York Times on Supreme Court nominee John Roberts's writings on a constitutional right to privacy.
  • Antitrust case puts NCAA on defense
    July 31, 2005
    Professor Paul Haagen comments to The Indianapolis Star on an antitrust challenge by the National Invitation Tournament to the NCAA requirement that teams invited to the Division I basketball tournament attend.
  • Investors ignore refund deadline
    July 30, 2005
    In charge of overseeing the distribution of funds in case of Wall Street firms' settlement over biased research, Professor Francis McGovern discusses filing deadline for investors with The Los Angeles Times.
  • Lawyers, doctors destined to duel
    July 24, 2005
    Russell M. Robinson, II Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology Neil Vidmar comments to St. Petersburg Times on the long history of lawyers alleging medical malpractice and doctors criticizing both lawyers and juries for their handling of malpractice cases.
  • Donaldson: The Exit Interview
    July 23, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to The New York Times on the record of former SEC Chair William Donaldson.
  • Be prepared to filibuster Roberts
    July 21, 2005
    In Atlanta Journal-Constitution op-ed, Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky calls on Senate Democrats to ask "probing and detailed" questions of Supreme Court nominee Roberts, and be prepared to filibuster confirmation if satisfactory answers are not forthcoming.
  • Rigorous questions would only be fair
    July 21, 2005
    In Philadelphia Inquirer op-ed, Professor Neil Siegel advises Senators to question Supreme Court nominee Roberts carefully about his legal methodology, ideology, and temperament.  (Free registration required.)
  • The Court rules, but the lawmakers act, and we respond
    July 17, 2005
    Charles S. Murphy Professor of Law and Public Policy Studies Christopher Schroeder discusses the practical effect of Supreme Court rulings Raleigh News and Observer.
  • Let the grilling begin
    July 13, 2005
    In an opinion-editorial in The Los Angeles Times, Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky argues that Supreme Court nominees can and must be questioned closely regarding ideology.
  • White House Mum, Critics Howl Over Rove's Role in CIA Leak
    July 12, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Houston Chronicle, saying it is too soon to say what liability Karl Rove may or may not face in the case of leaked information about an undercover CIA operative.
  • O'Connor vacancy 'chilling' to activists
    July 8, 2005
    Professor Neil Siegel comments to The Washington Blade on the possible implications of the ideology of a new Supreme Court justice on the Court.
  • A defining moment for Bush's legacy
    July 3, 2005
    Professor Neil Siegel comments to The Desert Morning News on how the Supreme Court might change when a justice nominated by President Bush replaces retiring Justice O'Connor.
  • Get ready for war of the words over court
    July 3, 2005
    Professor Neil Seigel comments to Philadelphia Inquirer on retirement of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, calling it a "seismic" event.
  • Prisoners in no man's land must be protected
    July 3, 2005
    Professor Erwin Chemerinsky co-authors opinion editorial in Contra Costa Times, arguing that while the call to close the military base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, may be well-intentioned, it is misguided unless steps are taken to ensure that American courts retain jurisdiction over detainees.
  • Ties to Bush family, Roe v. Wade could lead Jones to high court
    July 1, 2005
    Professor Neil Siegel comments to The Houston Chronicle on the record of Fifth Circuit Judge Edith Hollan Jones, who is reputed to be on the president's short list of possible Supreme Court nominees.  Siegel calls her "not just conservative, but very, very conservative."
  • On the 10 Commandments
    June 28, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The Chicago Tribune on the two recent Supreme Court rulings regarding the public display of the Ten Commandments. Chemerinsky argued on behalf of the petitioner in Van Orden v. Perry.
  • New Deal will Affect the Young and the Old
    June 23, 2005
    Professor Paul Haagen comments to The New York Times on the NBA's new labor deal that sets a minimum age limit of 19 on eligibility for the draft. Haagen says that the chances are high that it will withstand a legal challenge.
  • The rhetoric behind "strict constructionism"
    June 19, 2005
    In an opinion editorial in Durham's Herald-Sun, Professor Neil Siegel and co-author Aziz Huq discuss what the majority and dissent opinions in Roper v. Simmons reveal about "strict constructionism" and "judicial activisim."
  • Ford Damages to be Refigured
    June 17, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The Los Angeles Times on the California Supreme Court ruling that Ford's practice of hiding a used car's repair history must be weighed in setting punitive damages for his clients, who sued over the repair history of their 1997 Ford Taurus.
  • Test Message
    June 17, 2005
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  • Why President Bush Should Not Take the 5th
    June 17, 2005
    In an opinion-editorial in The Houston Chronicle, Professor Neil Siegel comments on the significance of the Supreme Court's reversal of the Fifth Circuit in Miller-El v. Dretke, and argues that the lower court's ruling in that case, and others, offers evidence of judicial activism in capital cases. 
  • From Legal Analysts, a Mixed Verdict on the Trial
    June 14, 2005
    Professor Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The Washington Post on Michael Jackson's acquittal on child molestation charges, noting the difficulties in securing a conviction against a celebrity.
  • Medical marijuana: read between the lines
    June 14, 2005
    Following the Supreme Court's ruling on medical marijuana, Professor Neil Siegel calls on Congress and the president to act to allow ill individuals to possess small amounts of the drug for medicinal purposes in Raleigh News and Observer op-ed.
  • The Interrogation of Detainee 63
    June 14, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, director of LENS, discusses interrogation of Guantanamo Bay prisoners on NPR's "The Connection." (Audio required.)
  • SEC says Berkshire unit knew of AIG's intent
    June 9, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to The Boston Globe on the latest legal action related to a probe of accounting practices at AIG, the world's largest insurer.
  • Bush Picks Conservative California Congressman to Head SEC
    June 3, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox tells The Washington Post that Rep. Christopher Cox, nominated to chair the SEC, has generally not been an advocate for investors' rights.
  • Deep Throat's Message
    June 3, 2005
    In an opinion-editorial in Raleigh's News and Observer, Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky argues that federal shield laws are needed to protect reporters from having to reveal the identities of confidential sources. 
  • French Twist Could Block EU Constitution
    May 27, 2005
    Professor Francesca Bignami comments to the ABA Journal and Report on the implications of an EU member state's failure to ratify the EU constitution.
  • N.C. law allows group to sue over alleged dog abuse
    May 25, 2005
    Charles L. B. Lowndes Emeritus Professor of Law William Reppy tells NPR's "Day to Day" that a one-of-a-kind North Carolina statue can bring immediate relief in animal abuse cases when prosecutors are still pondering the evidence. (Audio required)
  • Outsourcing a real nasty job
    May 23, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of LENS, comments to U.S. News and World Report on a directive signed by President Bush that may provide authority for the "extraordinary rendition" of terrorism suspects.
  • A Portrait of Class in America (letters)
    May 19, 2005
    In a letter to the editor of The New York Times, Professor Barak Richman points out that with risk-pooling and undifferentiated health benefit packages, everyone pays similar health insurance premiums, yet wealthier Americans get better care. One reason, he suggests, is that out-of-pocket co-payments deter the poor, not the rish, from using their insurance to the fullest.
  • Time to claim your slice of the pie
    May 19, 2005
    Financial Times (London) cites paper co-authored by Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox which discusses the potential liability of pension fund trustees who do not file to claim the proceeds of lawsuits to which the funds might be entitled.
  • Hahn was unable to connect with city
    May 18, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments on outgoing L.A. Mayor James Hahn's record to The Los Angeles Times.
  • Study backing trial lawyers' view comes late to debate
    May 16, 2005
    Chicago Sun-Times article says a new study by Neil Vidmar, Russell M. Robinson, II Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology, pokes holes in many of the arguments for capping medical malpractice damages.
  • Law schools' case vs. govt. off to high court
    May 8, 2005
    Professor Erwin Chemerinsky discusses his involvement as a named plaintiff in a challenge to the Solomon Amendment, which requires law schools to allow military recruiters on campus. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear Rumsfeld v. Forum for Academic and Institutional Rights next year. Professor Scott Silliman, and Duke Law students Teresa Sakash and Jeffrey Filipink also comment to Durham's Herald-Sun.
  • Mistrial in Abu Ghraib Abuse Case
    May 4, 2005
  • Professor Scott Silliman, LENS executive director, discusses the dismissal of Pfc. Lynddie England's guilty plea to charges stemming from abuses at Abu Ghraib prison with CNN'sWolf Blitzer. 
  • Professor Silliman also comments to ABC's "World News Tonight" (transcript e-mailed upon request to eduke@duke.edu) and Australian Broadcasting http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2005/s1360817.htm
  • The State of Things
    May 3, 2005
    LENS Executive Director, Professor Scott Silliman, joins a conversation on WUNC Radio's "The State of Things" on how public perception of the military has changed in the year since the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse scandal surfaced.
  • Is Lynndie England a Victim or Victimizer?
    May 2, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, tells ABC's "World News Tonight" that in reaching a plea bargain with Lynndie England, the government was seeking to close out the Abu Ghraib prison scandal and move on to other things.
  • Self-defense or Murder in Iraq?
    April 26, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of LENS, comments to ABC News about the case of 2nd Lt. Ilario Pantano who is accused of murdering two unarmed Iraqis. (Professor Silliman also interviewed on ABC's "Nightline.")
  • The Senate, judges and the filibuster
    April 25, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The Christian Science Monitor on the purpose of the Senate filibuster.
  • Marine in Iraq Faces Court Martial for Murder
    April 22, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, executive director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, comments on NPR's "Morning Edition" on the charges filed against a Marine who killed two suspected insurgents in Iraq. (Audio required)
  • Moussauoui pleads guilty to terrorism
    April 22, 2005
    Professor and LENS Executive Director Scott Silliman comments to Dallas Morning News on the guilty plea of Zaccharias Moussauoui to complicity in the 9/11 plot, and the implications of a trial for the Justice Department.
  • Compensation closer in case of tainted reports
    April 17, 2005
    Law Professors Francis McGovern and James Cox comment to Raleigh's News and Observer on McGovern's "Global Research Analyst Settlement" regarding shareholders' claims against 12 large brokerage firms accused of issuing tainted stock reports on dozens of companies.
  • Rethinking Guantanamo Bay
    April 14, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, director of LENS, comments to National Public Radio on the Pentagon's rumored re-thinking of its use of Guantanamo Naval Base as a detention facility for enemy combatants.
  • WTO softens earlier condemnation of U.S. ban on Internet gambling
    April 14, 2005
    Professor Joost Pauwelyn authors opinion-editorial in ASIL Insights regarding the WTO Appellate Body's substantial reversal of an earlier Panel decision condemning a U.S. ban on Internet gambling.
  • $440 Million Investor Fund Clears Hurdle
    April 11, 2005
  • Duke Law Professor Francis McGovern comments to CNN/Money on the plan he developed to distribute $440 million to investors who bought stock based on tainted Wall Street research.
  • -- Also, Wall Street Journal: Court Approves Stock Settlement Over Research.  Link for subscribers; article e-mailed upon request to eduke@duke.edu http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB111327053280004287,00.html
  • Arming teachers is not the answer
    April 10, 2005
    In a guest editorial in the Durham Herald-Sun, Professor Doriane Coleman takes issue with the suggestion of Sandra Froman, vice president of the National Rifle Association, that teachers should be armed in order to better protect students. (LexisNexis account required.)
  • GOP Court Bashing Undermines System
    April 10, 2005
    In an opinion editorial in The Philadelphia Inquirer, Professor Erwin Chemerinsky charges that with their recent verbal attacks on the judiciary, some Republican leaders are in fact objecting to judicial independence.
  • A truly global problem
    April 8, 2005
    William R. and Thomas L. Perkins Professor of Law Jonathan Wiener, who directs the Duke Center for Environmental Solutions, comments to CNN on the challenges involved in reaching an international accord to address climate change.
  • Animal Rights Advocacy is a Growing Field
    April 8, 2005
    Charles L. B. Lowndes Emeritus Professor of Law William Reppy comments to The Los Angeles Times on the growing field of animal law and how Duke Law plans to use its $1 million endowment from television host Bob Barker.
  • Players eye pro chance
    April 8, 2005
    Professor Paul Haagen comments to Raleigh's News and Observer about his work with Duke's "Professional Sports Counseling Committee," which helps Duke athletes determine their chances of being drafted by a professional team.
  • Litigation a given in the battle for MCI
    April 7, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox tells The Denver Post that although MCI board has a right to select a lower bid if directors believe it would be in the company's interests, larger insitutional shareholders are almost sure to sue after the deal is done.
  • Federal Judge Condemns Intervention in Schiavo Case
    March 31, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The New York Times on 11th Circuit Judge Stanley F. Birch Jr.'s condemnation of presidential and congressional intervention in Schiavo case.
  • LAPD Settling Abuse Scandal
    March 31, 2005
    Professor Erwin Chemerinsky, who led an independent investigation into corruption in the anti-gang unit of the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart precinct, comments to The Los Angeles Times on the LAPD's $70 million settlement with victims.  (Registration required.)
  • Stock trades on lawsuit only
    March 31, 2005
    Commenting to Raleigh's News and Observer, Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox calls trading interest in PharmaNetics, based on the speculative outcome of a lawsuit, risky and unusual.
  • Flashy, Deft Lawyer Known Worldwide
    March 30, 2005
    Professor Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The Los Angeles Times on legal prowess of the late Johnnie Cochran

    See also:  Cochrane's Death Raises Questions for High Court Case

    http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1112177109641
  • Spouse as Next of Kin Law Has Many Roots
    March 29, 2005
    Charles S. Murphy Professor of Law and Professor of Public Policy Studies Christopher Schroeder comments to Newsday on the origins of the law that appoints the spouse as next of kin.
  • Why Some Children Become Violent
    March 28, 2005
    In an interview with Raleigh's News and Observer, Professor Doriane Coleman discusses the causes of and possible remedies for youth dysfunction and violence in American society.
  • Lexar wins millions in damages
    March 25, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to The San Francisco Chronicle on the significance of a $465 million jury award to Lexar Media Inc. in its intellectual property lawsuit against Toshiba Corp.
  • Assassination ban 'no-shield' for al-Qaida
    March 24, 2005
    Professor Scott Silliman, director of LENS, tells UPI how "lethal force"--assassinations--can be used by military personnel in war.
  • Freezing of Gemstar Severance is OKd
    March 23, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to The Los Angeles Times on the significance of a U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling allowing the SEC to use the Sarbanes-Oxley Act to hold payouts to executives accused of wrongdoing.
  • High Court Reviews Cochran Case
    March 22, 2005
    National Public Radio's Nina Totenberg previews Supreme Court arguments in Tory v. Cochran. Professor Erwin Chemerinsky argues for the petitioner. (Audio required.)
  • Fraud Verdict is Ominous for Toppled CEOs
    March 16, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Los Angeles Times on conviction of former WorldCom CEO Bernard Ebbers.
  • It Better Not Be Lonely at the Top In the New World of Today's CEO
    March 16, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments on corporate governance to The Wall Street Journal following the fraud conviction of former WorldCom CEO Bernard Ebbers.  (Link for subscribers.)

    Professor Cox also comments to Kansas City Star.
  • Malpractice costs aren't a real crisis
    March 16, 2005
    Russell M. Robinson II Professor of Law Neil Vidmar comments to Tallahassee Democrat about a study he conducted with Dr. Paul Love of Duke's School of Medicine on medical malpractice claims in Florida since 1990.
  • How to Fix the Tort System
    March 14, 2005
    Feature article in Business Week cites unpublished study co-authored by Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox that indicates that even sophisticated institutional investors claim less than 30% of the money they could get from securities fraud class actions. (Registration required.)
  • GOP ponders
    March 9, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells The Sacramento Bee that the Senate would dramatically be changed as an institution if Republicans shut down filibusters on judicial nominees; the Democrats could grind the Senate agenda to a halt. (Free registration required.)
  • We're on a Mission from God
    March 9, 2005
    Slate Magazine's "Jurisprudence' column cites Duke Law Professor Jeff Powell as describing Justice Antonin Scalia as "a hard positivist whose view is that law is simply whatever the sovereign has ordained, with a little waffle room for tradition."
  • Oregon's right to decide
    March 4, 2005
    Professor Erwin Chemerinsky co-athored this opinion-editorial (with Judith Daar, UC Irvine clinical professor of medicine) in The News and Observer on challenges to Oregon's physician-assisted suicide law.
  • Duke Prof Presents Plaintiff's Case to Court
    March 3, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Durham's Herald-Sun about his Supreme Court argument in Van Orden v. Perry.
  • Justices Consider Religious Displays
    March 3, 2005
    The New York Times reports on arguments in Van Orden v. Perry.  Professor Erwin Chemerinsky argued against the public display of the Ten Commandments.
  • Duke prof at high court over Ten Commandments today
    March 2, 2005
    The Herald-Sun profiles Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky and discusses his involvement in Van Orden v. Perry.  Dean Katharine Bartlett comments.
  • U.S. last to execute ban
    March 2, 2005
    Duke Law Professor James Coleman comments to Newsday on work being done to outlaw execution of mentally ill defendants who have not been found to be retarded or insane.
  • High Court to Rule on 2 States' Displays of 10 Commandments
    March 1, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Los Angeles Times on what constitutes constitutionally permissible displays of the Ten Commandments.
    (Other related articles in Houston Chronicle, The Guardian (London), and The Charlotte Observer.)
  • The State of Things: Military Justice
    March 1, 2005
    Scott Silliman, director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, joins a discussion of wartime military justice on WUNC Radio's "The State of Things." (Audio.)
  • The Ten Commandments Reach the Supreme Court
    February 28, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to The New York Times on Van Orden v. Perry, a challenge to the public display of the Ten Commandments. Chemerinsky will argue the case in the Supreme Court on behalf of the petitioner on March 2, 2005.
  • MCI's top exec still has Verizon as focus
    February 26, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to Denver Post on the merits of current and potential shareholder lawsuits against MCI should the company pursue a sale to Verizon without seriously considering a higher bid from Qwest.
  • Animal Rights Advocacy is a Growing Field
    February 25, 2005
    Charles L. B. Lowndes Emeritus Professor of Law William Reppy tells Los Angeles Times about growing interest in animal law in law schools, and about endowment from television personality Bob Barker.
  • Prof sticks it to fans over steroids
    February 19, 2005
    Law Professor James Coleman tells Las Vegas Review-Journal that fan demand for exaggerated accomplishments in sports fuels steroid use by athletes.
  • 3 from N.C. on judicial list
    February 15, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Raleigh News and Observer about the president's latest list of judicial nominees.
  • Securities Class-Action Settlement Sums Reach a Record
    February 15, 2005
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James D. Cox comments to New York Times on reasons for record security class-action settlements.
  • NHL season's end seems certain
    February 14, 2005
    Professor of Law Paul Haagen comments to Raleigh News and Observer on possible labor scenarios in the NHL's ongoing dispute with its players.
  • In Depth Look at Supreme Court Decisions
    February 11, 2005
    Professor of Law Thomas Metzloff tells host Jay Sekulow of Christian Broadcast Radio about his video documentaries of the stories behind major Supreme Court decisions. (Audio required.)
  • Hahn Urges Ethics Rules
    February 5, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Los Angeles Times on the findings of a "blue ribbon" panel he headed which looked into the ways contracts are awarded by the Los Angeles harbor, water, and power departments.
  • The right court to judge Darfur atrocities
    February 3, 2005
    Visiting Professor Cesare P. R. Romano authored this opinion-editorial in Raleigh's News and Observer urging the United Nations Security Council to make sure the International Criminal Court prosecutes atrocities in Sudan.
  • Judge Backs Guantanamo Detainee Challenges
    January 31, 2005
    Scott Silliman, Director of Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security comments to the Associated Press on international reaction to lengthy detentions of "enemy combatants" at Guantanamo Naval Base.
  • Inmate ruling courts debate
    January 30, 2005
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Delaware State News on constitutionality of a Delaware bill that extends an inmate's sentence and overturns a decision by the Delaware Supreme Court.
  • Gonzales: Torture treaty doesn't bar 'cruel, inhuman' tactics
    January 25, 2005
    Scott Silliman, Director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, tells Kansas City Star that recent reports of widespread abuse of detainees should require congressional oversight. (Free registration required.)
  • Europe finds you can be too careful.
    January 23, 2005
    William R. and Thomas L. Perkins Professor of Law Jonathan Wiener comments to The Star-Ledger on Europe's precautionary principle, noting that it may be appropriate for evaluating pollution and other environmental hazards.
  • New Job Puts Allen Close to President
    January 18, 2005
    Professor James Coleman comments to Raleigh News and Observer about Claude Allen's appointment as domestic policy advisor to President Bush.
  • How Long is Too Long for the Court's Justices?
    January 16, 2005
    The New York Times covers Duke Law Professor Paul Carrington's proposal, co-authored with Professor Roger Cramton of Cornell, to limit the terms of Supreme Court Justices.
  • Families of Slain Private Security Contractors Sue for Negligence
    January 6, 2005
    LENS Director Scott Silliman tells The Los Angeles Times that the families of four American security contractors killed in Falluja, Iraq, last March, face at least one hurdle in their lawsuit against the security firm that hired them.
  • AG hopeful Gonzales to be grilled on inmate treatment
    January 5, 2005
    Scott Silliman, director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, comments to the Salt Lake Tribune that the key questions for senators in the confirmation hearings of Attorney-General nominee Alberto Gonzales could be "will he be an attorney-general who follows the rule of law first, or is he the president's man first?"
  • Coming to Terms with Supreme Court Tenure
    January 3, 2005
    Legal Times reports on a proposal by Duke Law Professor Paul Carrington and other noted law professors, for legislation that would limit tenure of Supreme Court justices.