VAP Program & Academic Market

students in discussions after LEAD WeekDuke Law School students and graduates increasingly seek careers in academia. In recognition of this fact, the Law School has put in place a number of programs aimed at current students, including a student scholarship colloquium and spaces for interested students at faculty workshops.

The School also offers assistance to Duke alumni seeking to enter the law school teaching market. It has created an Academic Careers Committee that offers candidates practice job talks, helps schedule them for workshops at other schools, organizes faculty recommendations, and centralizes the Law School's marketing of the candidate to other schools. The giving of advice is not limited to members of the committee, other members of the faculty also provide advice to applicants. The committee also is available as an organized resource that helps to make sure that applicants receive the guidance they need.

In addition, the School encourages Duke Law alumni to apply to our Visiting Assistant Professor program. For graduates of any law school who plan a career in legal academia but who have not yet entered the teaching market, we have established a program to bring aspiring law teachers into the Law School as visiting assistant professors. Visiting assistant professors spend two academic years at the Law School, giving them time to work on scholarship in anticipation of their entry on the law school teaching market. Each visiting assistant professor is provided with an office and is invited to participate in faculty activities open to visiting professors. Each has a very light teaching load - one course per year. Selection for participation in this program is competitive, based on potential for success in an academic career.

Visiting Assistant Professors

The Visiting Assistant Professorship Program at Duke Law School supports aspiring law faculty. Visiting assistant professors are in residence at the Law School for two academic years, with the expectation that they will enter the law school teaching market in the fall of their second year. A visiting assistant professor is provided with a regular faculty office and receives administrative and secretarial support. He or she teaches one course per academic year (or two courses if he or she prefers two) and has no administrative responsibilities. Each visiting assistant professor is invited to participate in all faculty activities open to visiting professors, including faculty workshops and conferences. In addition, each visiting assistant professor will have at least one opportunity to present a paper in the faculty workshop series and helps lead student early stages workshops.

Compensation

The salary for each visiting assistant professor is $50,000 in the first year and $55,000 in the second year plus benefits (including health insurance).

The Selection Process

We invite applications from graduates of any law school and any year of graduation. We encourage applications from those with experience in law practice. Candidates will be selected based on their potential to obtain a tenure-track position at a leading law school.

Applications should include:

  • a curriculum vita
  • a law school transcript
  • written academic references emailed from each reference directly to vapprogram@law.duke.edu
  • copies of any scholarly legal articles that the candidate has written and would like to have considered, whether published, unpublished, or in draft form
  • a list of law school courses the candidate would be willing to teach (listed in order of preference)
  • a scholarly agenda outline, with particular emphasis on the scholarship contemplated during the professorship period.

If you would like to be considered for a visiting assistant professor position beginning in the fall of 2015, please send your complete application materials via email to vapprogram@law.duke.edu by January 5, 2015. We will begin reviewing the applications shortly thereafter.

Please direct any questions to vapprogram@law.duke.edu.

Law School Teaching Guide

The Law School's Academic Careers Committee offers alumni practice job talks, helps schedule them for workshops at other schools, organizes faculty recommenders, and centralizes the Law School's marketing of the candidate to other schools. The giving of advice is not limited to members of the committee: Other faculty provide advice to applicants (and applicants have discussions with their references on the faculty), but the committee is available as a resource and helps to make sure that applicants receive the advice they need. The contact address for the committee is: vapprograms@law.duke.edu.

In addition to this personalized guidance, there are a number of websites that offer general advice to prospective legal academics about the law teaching market. They include:

 

Current VAPs

Former VAPs

2012–2014
  • Destiny Peery
    JD, PhD, Northwestern University
    Assistant Professor at Northwestern Law School

Taisu Zhang
BA,JD, PhD, Yale University
Assistant Professor at Duke Law School

2011–2014

Suzanne Katzenstein
BA, Wesleyan University; JD, Harvard Law School
Senior Fellow at The Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University

2011–2013
  • Margaret Hu
    JD, Duke Law School
    Assistant Professor of Law, Washington and Lee School of Law
2010–2012
  • Christopher Griffin
    JD, Yale Law School
    Assistant Professor of Law, William & Mary Law School
2010–2011
  • John Inazu
    JD, Duke University; MA, PhD Political Science, University of North Carolina
    Associate Professor of Law, Washington University Law School
2008–2010
  • Roman Hoyos
    JD, Northwestern University; PhD, University of Chicago
    Associate Professor of Law, Southwestern Law School
  • Noah Weisbord
    JD, McGill University; MS, McGill University; LLM, Harvard University; PhD (expected), Harvard University
    Associate Professor of Law, Florida International University
2007–2009
  • Shawn Bayern
    JD, University of California, Berkeley
    Larry and Joyce Beltz Professor of Torts, Florida State Law School
  • Zephyr Teachout
    JD, MA Political Science, Duke University
    Associate Professor of Law, Fordham Law School
2005–2006
  • David Gray
    JD, New York University School of Law; MA, PhD, Northwestern University
    Professor of Law, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law