304 Big Bank Regulation

Banking has evolved rapidly in just a few years. Global trade and investment has been supported and promoted by an emerging global financial system. This has in turn encouraged the growth of giant universal banks, based in the United States, the United Kingdom, mainland Europe, and in China and Japan. Most modern banks of any significant size (greater than $100 billion in total assets) have transnational and often truly global operations, but they also create major new risks and regulatory challenges. The debate over big banks and "too big to fail" concerns continue to be an important public policy concerns in the 2016 Presidential election campaign. Since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008, the largest in a long run of domestic and international crises since the Great Depression of the 1930s, a new framework has been emerging that fundamentally changes the way in which such financial institutions must be regulated. The walls between the three main sectors of finance-banking, securities and insurance-have broken down, yet at their core banks continue to be somewhat unique in their functions and the challenges they present for financial stability. This course will review this development and focus on the established and emerging regulatory architectures and systems, both domestic and international, as well as the future challenges and prospects for global and domestic financial reform.

Although there will be a substantial amount of statutory and some important case law, the course will be of interest to, and manageable by, graduate students in public policy, economics and business studies.

 

Course Frequency*
Course Areas of Practice
2016
Fall 2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

304.01 4
  • Scheduled in-class examination
Lawrence G. Baxter MWTh 9:00-10:15 AM 4047

Banking has evolved rapidly in just a few years. Global trade and investment has been supported and promoted by an emerging global financial system. This has in turn encouraged the growth of giant universal banks, based in the United States, the United Kingdom, mainland Europe, and in China and Japan. Most modern banks of any significant size (greater than $100 billion in total assets) have transnational and often truly global operations, but they also create major new risks and regulatory challenges. The debate over big banks and "too big to fail" concerns continue to be an important public policy concerns in the 2016 Presidential election campaign. Since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008, the largest in a long run of domestic and international crises since the Great Depression of the 1930s, a new framework has been emerging that fundamentally changes the way in which such financial institutions must be regulated. The walls between the three main sectors of finance-banking, securities and insurance-have broken down, yet at their core banks continue to be somewhat unique in their functions and the challenges they present for financial stability. This course will review this development and focus on the established and emerging regulatory architectures and systems, both domestic and international, as well as the future challenges and prospects for global and domestic financial reform.

Although there will be a substantial amount of statutory and some important case law, the course will be of interest to, and manageable by, graduate students in public policy, economics and business studies.

There will be a 3-hour closed book exam.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2015
Fall 2015
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

304.01 4 Lawrence G. Baxter M,W,Th 9:00-10:15 AM Room 4045

Banking has evolved rapidly in just a few years. Global trade and investment has been supported and promoted by an emerging global financial system. This has in turn encouraged the growth of giant universal banks, based in the United States, the United Kingdom, mainland Europe, and in China and Japan. Most modern banks of any significant size (greater than $100 billion in total assets) have transnational and often truly global operations, irrespective of where they are headquartered. These financial behemoths present new opportunities for global finance, but they also create dramatic new risks and regulatory challenges. Since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008, the largest in a long run of domestic and international crises since the Great Depression of the 1930s, a new framework has been emerging that fundamentally changes the way in which such financial institutions must be regulated. The walls between the three main sectors of finance—banking, securities and insurance—have broken down, yet at their core banks continue to be somewhat unique in their functions and the challenges they present for financial stability. This course will review this development and focus on the established and emerging regulatory architectures and systems, both domestic and international, as well as the future challenges and prospects for global and domestic financial reform.Although there will be a substantial amount of statutory and some important case law, the course will be of interest to, and manageable by, graduate students in public policy, economics and business studies.There will be a 3-hour open book exam.

Syllabus: File 304.01.Fall2015-syllabus.docx

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2014
Fall 2014
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

304.01 4 Lawrence G. Baxter M,W,Th 9:30-10:45 am Room 3041
Banking has evolved rapidly in just a few years. Global trade and investment has been supported and promoted by an emerging global financial system. This has in turn encouraged the growth of giant universal banks, based in the United States, the United Kingdom, mainland Europe, and in China and Japan. Most modern banks of any significant size (greater than $100 billion in total assets) have transnational and often truly global operations, irrespective of where they are headquartered. These financial behemoths present new opportunities for global finance, but they also create dramatic new risks and regulatory challenges. Since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008, the largest in a long run of domestic and international crises since the Great Depression of the 1930s, a new framework has been emerging that fundamentally changes the way in which such financial institutions must be regulated. The walls between the three main sectors of finance-banking, securities and insurance-have broken down, yet at their core banks continue to be somewhat unique in their functions and the challenges they present for financial stability. This course will review this development and focus on the established and emerging regulatory architectures and systems, both domestic and international, as well as the future challenges and prospects for global and domestic financial reform.Although there will be a substantial amount of statutory and some important case law, the course will be of interest to, and manageable by,Graduate students in public policy, economics and business studies.There will be a 3-hour open book exam.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2013
Fall 2013
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

304.01 4 Lawrence G. Baxter M-Th 10:00-10:55 am Room 3041
Banking has evolved rapidly in just a few years. Global trade and investment has been supported and promoted by an emerging global financial system. This has in turn encouraged the growth of giant universal banks, based in the United States, the United Kingdom, mainland Europe, and in China and Japan. Most modern banks of any significant size (greater than $100 billion in total assets) have transnational and often truly global operations, irrespective of where they are headquartered. These financial behemoths present new opportunities for global finance, but they also create dramatic new risks and regulatory challenges. Since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008, the largest in a long run of domestic and international crises since the Great Depression of the 1930s, a new framework has been emerging that fundamentally changes the way in which such financial institutions must be regulated. The walls between the three main sectors of finance-banking, securities and insurance-have broken down, yet at their core banks continue to be somewhat unique in their functions and the challenges they present for financial stability. This course will review this development and focus on the established and emerging regulatory architectures and systems, both domestic and international, as well as the future challenges and prospects for global and domestic financial reform.Although there will be a substantial amount of statutory and some important case law, the course will be of interest to, and manageable by,Graduate students in public policy, economics and business studies.There will be a 3-hour open book exam.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
Spring 2013
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

304.01 4 Lawrence G. Baxter Tu, W, Th, F 11:00-11:55 am Room 4042
Banking has evolved rapidly in just a few years. Global trade and investment has been supported and promoted by an emerging global financial system. This has in turn encouraged the growth of giant universal banks, based in the United States, the United Kingdom, mainland Europe, and in China and Japan. Most modern banks of any significant size (greater than $100 billion in total assets) have transnational and often truly global operations, irrespective of where they are headquartered. These financial behemoths present new opportunities for global finance, but they also create dramatic new risks and regulatory challenges. Since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008, the largest in a long run of domestic and international crises since the Great Depression of the 1930s, a new framework has been emerging that fundamentally changes the way in which such financial institutions must be regulated. The walls between the three main sectors of finance-banking, securities and insurance-have broken down, yet at their core banks continue to be somewhat unique in their functions and the challenges they present for financial stability. This course will review this development and focus on the established and emerging regulatory architectures and systems, both domestic and international, as well as the future challenges and prospects for global and domestic financial reform.Although there will be a substantial amount of statutory and some important case law, the course will be of interest to, and manageable by,Graduate students in public policy, economics and business studies.There will be a 3-hour open book exam.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.