309 Children and the Law

This seminar is derived from the three-credit Children and the Law course.  Where the latter is a broad survey of the law governing decision making for children and the relationship between parents and the state that arises in that context, this seminar focuses in on the three areas of the law that tend to generate the most cultural and legal controversy: education, religion, and maltreatment.  Students will be required to prepare memoranda throughout the semester on related topics including home schooling, curriculum reform, vaccination law, proxy consents to medical treatment and research, corporal punishment, and the Fourth Amendment’s special needs administrative search exception.  The course can be used to satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.  There are no prerequisites.  However, because the subject matter builds on the foundations of constitutional law, property, and torts, it will be useful to have taken these classes.

Course Areas of Practice
Course Type
Seminar
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge and understanding of substantive and procedural law
2018
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

309.01 2
  • Reflection Papers
  • Final paper (10+ pages in length)
Doriane Lambelet Coleman Tu 10:30-12:20 PM 3171

This seminar is derived from the three-credit Children and the Law course.  Where the latter is a broad survey of the law governing decision making for children and the relationship between parents and the state that arises in that context, this seminar focuses in on the three areas of the law that tend to generate the most cultural and legal controversy: education, religion, and maltreatment.  Students will be required to prepare memoranda throughout the semester on related topics including home schooling, curriculum reform, vaccination law, proxy consents to medical treatment and research, corporal punishment, and the Fourth Amendment’s special needs administrative search exception.  The course can be used to satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.  There are no prerequisites.  However, because the subject matter builds on the foundations of constitutional law, property, and torts, it will be useful to have taken these classes.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2016
Spring 2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

309.01 2 Doriane Lambelet Coleman Tu 3:45-5:35 PM 4040

This seminar is derived from the three-credit Children and the Law Course. Where the latter is a broad survey of the law governing legal decision making for children and the relationship between parents and the state that arises in that context, this seminar focuses on the contest between parents and the state over the development of the child's mind and the ways the law facilitates and challenges that contest. Following an introduction to the concept of the child in U.S. and international law, the course provides deeper examination of the three areas of the law that are most implicated in this respect: education, religion, and maltreatment. Students will be required to submit a two-page reflection paper before each class meeting and to prepare a research paper on a related topic. Individual enrolled students may opt to take the course also for writing credit in which case requirements for the research paper are more detailed.

Taught by Professor Doriane Lambelet Coleman

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2015
Spring 2015
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

309.01 2 Doriane Lambelet Coleman Th 3:15-5:05 pm Room 4040
This seminar is derived from the three-credit Children and the Law Course. Where the latter is a broad survey of the law governing legal decision making for children and the relationship between parents and the state that arises in that context, this seminar focuses on the contest between parents and the state over the development of the child's mind and the ways the law facilitates and challenges that contest. Following an introduction to the concept of the child in U.S. and international law, the course provides deeper examination of the three areas of the law that are most implicated in this respect: education, religion, and maltreatment. Students will be required to submit a two-page reflection paper before each class meeting and to prepare a research paper on a related topic.Taught by Professor Doriane Lambelet Coleman

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2012
Fall 2012
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

309.01 2 Doriane Lambelet Coleman M / W 1:30-2:51 pm M / W 1:30-2:51 pm Room 4055
This seminar is derived from the three-credit Children and the Law Course. Where the latter is a broad survey of the law governing legal decision making for children and the relationship between parents and the state that arises in that context, this seminar focuses on the contest between parents and the state over the development of the child's mind and the ways the law facilitates and challenges that contest. Following an introduction to the concept of the child in U.S. and international law, the course provides deeper examination of the three areas of the law that are most implicated in this respect: education, religion, and maltreatment. Students will be required to submit a two-page reflection paper before each class meeting and to prepare a research paper on a related topic.Taught by Professor Doriane Lambelet Coleman

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
Spring 2012
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

309.01 2 Doriane Lambelet Coleman T/Th 1:30-2:51 pm T/Th 1:30-2:51 pm Room 4042
This seminar is derived from the three-credit Children and the Law Course. Where the latter is a broad survey of the law governing legal decision making for children and the relationship between parents and the state that arises in that context, this seminar focuses on the contest between parents and the state over the development of the child's mind and the ways the law facilitates and challenges that contest. Following an introduction to the concept of the child in U.S. and international law, the course provides deeper examination of the three areas of the law that are most implicated in this respect: education, religion, and maltreatment. Students will be required to submit a two-page reflection paper before each class meeting and to prepare a research paper on a related topic.Taught by Professor Doriane Lambelet Coleman

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.