333 Science Law & Policy

What are the government policies that support science? How is science regulated and controlled? What can science contribute to law and policy? How do the states, the federal government and international agencies interact to set science policy? How do disparate regulations and law impact research and translation? How is scientific research funded? These questions and more will be explored by looking at the interaction of law, science, and policy. The class is a mix of law, ethics and science students, and learning how to talk to one another in a common language is an important element of the course. Classes will include consideration and analysis of cases studies. There are no prerequisites for the course, and there is no requirement that students have either graduate or upper-level undergraduate training in the sciences. Course evaluation will be based on class participation, student presentation, weekly discussion questions, a short paper, and a final exam.

Course Areas of Practice
2017
Fall 2017
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

333.01 3
  • Take-home examination
  • Shorter reaction papers
  • Practical exercises
  • In-class exercise
  • Class participation
Michael B. Waitzkin Th 4:00-6:45 PM 4055

What are the government policies that support science? How is science regulated and controlled? What can science contribute to law and policy? How do the states, the federal government and international agencies interact to set science policy? How do disparate regulations and law impact research and translation? How is scientific research funded? These questions and more will be explored by looking at the interaction of law, science, and policy. The class is a mix of law, ethics and science students, and learning how to talk to one another in a common language is an important element of the course. Classes will include consideration and analysis of cases studies. There are no prerequisites for the course, and there is no requirement that students have either graduate or upper-level undergraduate training in the sciences. Course evaluation will be based on class participation, student presentation, weekly discussion questions, a short paper, and a final exam.

Syllabus: File 333.01.Fall2017-syllabus.docx

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2016
Fall 2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

333.01 3
  • Take-home examination
  • Shorter reaction papers
  • Practical exercises
  • In-class exercise
  • Class participation
Michael B. Waitzkin Th 3:45-6:30 PM 4055

What are the government policies that support science? How is science regulated and controlled? What can science contribute to law and policy? How do the states, the federal government and international agencies interact to set science policy? How do disparate regulations and law impact research and translation? How is scientific research funded? These questions and more will be explored by looking at the interaction of law, science, and policy. The class is a mix of law, ethics and science students, and learning how to talk to one another in a common language is an important element of the course. Classes will include consideration and analysis of cases studies. There are no prerequisites for the course, and there is no requirement that students have either graduate or upper-level undergraduate training in the sciences. Course evaluation will be based on class participation, student presentation, weekly discussion questions, a short paper, and a final exam.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
Spring 2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

333.01 3 Michael B. Waitzkin W 3:45-6:30 PM 4047

What are the government policies that support science?  What can science contribute to law and policy? How do different agencies govern the progress of scientific discovery? How do disparate regulations impact scientific funding in controversial areas like stem cell research? How is scientific research funded? What are the rules regarding research involving individuals, or the role of academic science in national innovation? These questions and more will be explored by reviewing the history of US science policy since World War II, and looking at the interaction of law, science, and policy with an emphasis on the life sciences in the United States. There are no prerequisites for the course, and the course is designed for students without graduate or upper-level undergraduate training in the sciences. Course evaluation will be based on weekly "blogs" on readings, one short reaction paper, and a final exam.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2014
Fall 2014
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

333.01 2 Nita A. Farahany M 3:45-5:35 pm Room 4055
What are the government policies that support science?  What can science contribute to law and policy? How do different agencies govern the progress of scientific discovery? How do disparate regulations impact scientific funding in controversial areas like stem cell research? How is scientific research funded? What are the rules regarding research involving individuals, or the role of academic science in national innovation? These questions and more will be explored by reviewing the history of US science policy since World War II, and looking at the interaction of law, science, and policy with an emphasis on the life sciences in the United States. There are no prerequisites for the course, and the course is designed for students without graduate or upper-level undergraduate training in the sciences. Course evaluation will be based on weekly "blogs" on readings, one short reaction paper, and a final exam.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2013
Fall 2013
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

333.01 2 Nita A. Farahany Tu 1:30-3:20 pm Room 3000
What are the government policies that support science?  What can science contribute to law and policy? How do different agencies govern the progress of scientific discovery? How do disparate regulations impact scientific funding in controversial areas like stem cell research? How is scientific research funded? What are the rules regarding research involving individuals, or the role of academic science in national innovation? These questions and more will be explored by reviewing the history of US science policy since World War II, and looking at the interaction of law, science, and policy with an emphasis on the life sciences in the United States. There are no prerequisites for the course, and the course is designed for students without graduate or upper-level undergraduate training in the sciences. Course evaluation will be based on weekly "blogs" on readings, one short reaction paper, and a final exam.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.