370 Introduction to Legal Theory

Legal Theory is a 3-credit lecture and discussion class with enrollment capped at 35. The course will be organized around a set of essential questions: Where does law come from? What, if anything, makes it legitimate? What does equality before the law mean? Does law prevent violence, or merely channel it? Does the law create the economy, or does economic life frame and limit the law? What is the right way to interpret a legal text? How should our understanding of law be affected by the fact that we live in a democratic country, a free-market country, a country with a written constitution? We will consider and approach these questions by way of major schools of legal thought, testing the theoretical approaches against our concrete sense of the problems a legal system has to address, and the shapes these problems take today. The class requirements include regular attendance and a take-home final exam. No prior exposure to legal theory, philosophy or political theory is required.

Course Areas of Practice
2015
Fall 2015
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

370.01 3 Jedediah Purdy M/W 11:00-12:20 PM Room 3000
Legal Theory is a 3-credit lecture and discussion class with enrollment capped at 35. The course will be organized around a set of essential questions: Where does law come from? What, if anything, makes it legitimate? What does equality before the law mean? Does law prevent violence, or merely channel it? Does the law create the economy, or does economic life frame and limit the law? What is the right way to interpret a legal text? How should our understanding of law be affected by the fact that we live in a democratic country, a free-market country, a country with a written constitution? We will consider and approach these questions by way of major schools of legal thought, testing the theoretical approaches against our concrete sense of the problems a legal system has to address, and the shapes these problems take today. The class requirements include regular attendance and a take-home final exam. No prior exposure to legal theory, philosophy or political theory is required.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2014
Fall 2014
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

370.01 3 Jedediah Purdy M/W 9:30-10:50 am Room 4055
Legal Theory is a 3-credit lecture and discussion class with enrollment capped at 35. The course will be organized around a set of essential questions: Where does law come from? What, if anything, makes it legitimate? What does equality before the law mean? Does law prevent violence, or merely channel it? Does the law create the economy, or does economic life frame and limit the law? What is the right way to interpret a legal text? How should our understanding of law be affected by the fact that we live in a democratic country, a free-market country, a country with a written constitution? We will consider and approach these questions by way of major schools of legal thought, testing the theoretical approaches against our concrete sense of the problems a legal system has to address, and the shapes these problems take today. The class requirements include regular attendance and a take-home final exam. No prior exposure to legal theory, philosophy or political theory is required.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2013
Spring 2013
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

370.02 3 James Boyle Tu / Th 10:40-12:01 pm Room 4055

Legal Theory is a 3-credit lecture and discussion class with enrollment capped at 35. The course will be organized around a set of essential questions: Where does law come from? What, if anything, makes it legitimate? What does equality before the law mean? Does law prevent violence, or merely channel it? Does the law create the economy, or does economic life frame and limit the law? What is the right way to interpret a legal text? How should our understanding of law be affected by the fact that we live in a democratic country, a free-market country, a country with a written constitution? We will consider and approach these questions by way of major schools of legal thought, testing the theoretical approaches against our concrete sense of the problems a legal system has to address, and the shapes these problems take today. The class requirements include regular attendance and a take-home final exam. No prior exposure to legal theory, philosophy or political theory is required.

Syllabus: PDF icon 370.02.Spring2013-syllabus.pdf

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2012
Fall 2012
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

370.01 3 Jedediah Purdy Tu / Th 10:40-12:01 pm Tu / Th 10:40-12:01 pm Room 4045
Legal Theory is a 3-credit lecture and discussion class with enrollment capped at 35. The course will be organized around a set of essential questions: Where does law come from? What, if anything, makes it legitimate? What does equality before the law mean? Does law prevent violence, or merely channel it? Does the law create the economy, or does economic life frame and limit the law? What is the right way to interpret a legal text? How should our understanding of law be affected by the fact that we live in a democratic country, a free-market country, a country with a written constitution? We will consider and approach these questions by way of major schools of legal thought, testing the theoretical approaches against our concrete sense of the problems a legal system has to address, and the shapes these problems take today. The class requirements include regular attendance and a take-home final exam. No prior exposure to legal theory, philosophy or political theory is required.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
Spring 2012
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

370.01 3 James Boyle T/Th 1:30-2:51 T/Th 1:30-2:51 Room 4045
Legal Theory is a 3-credit lecture and discussion class with enrollment capped at 35. The course will be organized around a set of essential questions: Where does law come from? What, if anything, makes it legitimate? What does equality before the law mean? Does law prevent violence, or merely channel it? Does the law create the economy, or does economic life frame and limit the law? What is the right way to interpret a legal text? How should our understanding of law be affected by the fact that we live in a democratic country, a free-market country, a country with a written constitution? We will consider and approach these questions by way of major schools of legal thought, testing the theoretical approaches against our concrete sense of the problems a legal system has to address, and the shapes these problems take today. The class requirements include regular attendance and a take-home final exam. No prior exposure to legal theory, philosophy or political theory is required.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.