International Civil Litigation

This course analyzes civil suits that raise cross-border, international and foreign legal issues. Specific topics covered include transnational jurisdiction, forum selection, international choice of law, extraterritorial application of U.S. law, service of process and discovery of evidence abroad, the special treatment of foreign governments as parties, and the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. The course focuses on how these topics are litigated in U.S. courts, but it also compares how similar issues are addressed in the European Union and Latin America.

Course Frequency*
Course Areas of Practice

Sections

Spring 2017
2017
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

501.01 3
  • Scheduled in-class examination
Ralf Michaels M/W M 2:00-3:20 PM/ W 1:45-3:05 PM 4055

This course analyzes civil suits that raise cross-border, international and foreign legal issues. Specific topics covered include transnational jurisdiction, forum selection, international choice of law, extraterritorial application of U.S. law, service of process and discovery of evidence abroad, the special treatment of foreign governments as parties, and the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. The course focuses on how these topics are litigated in U.S. courts, but it also compares how similar issues are addressed in the European Union and Latin America.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2015
Fall 2015
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

501.01 3 Laurence R. Helfer M/W 1:45-3:05 PM Room 4045

This section analyze the topics listed in the course description by reviewing U.S. and foreign case law, statutes, treaties, and several hypothetical and real-world problems. A recurring theme will be the Chevron-Ecuador lit igation, an ongoing legal dispute raising many of the topics in the course. A nontechnical overview of the litigation appears in Reversal of Fortune, a New Yorker article assigned for the first class session. There will also be an evening screening of the documentary film Crude and other materials relating to the suit.

Syllabus: PDF icon 501.01.Fall2015-syllabus.pdf

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2014
Fall 2014
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

501.01 3 Ralf Michaels M/W 1:45-3:05 pm Room 4045
This course is addressed to students preparing themselves to represent international interests in American courts, or their possible adversaries. Among the topics examined are (1) judicial jurisdiction to enforce American law on foreign firms or citizens doing business with Americans; (2) federal judicial jurisdiction over foreign governments and their citizens or to enforce international law; (3) discovery of evidence abroad and assistance to foreign courts seeking information in the United States; and (4) the respect given foreign proceedings and judgments.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2013
Fall 2013
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

501.01 3 Ralf Michaels M 3:00-4:50 pm Room 4046
This course is addressed to students preparing themselves to represent international interests in American courts, or their possible adversaries. Among the topics examined are (1) judicial jurisdiction to enforce American law on foreign firms or citizens doing business with Americans; (2) federal judicial jurisdiction over foreign governments and their citizens or to enforce international law; (3) discovery of evidence abroad and assistance to foreign courts seeking information in the United States; and (4) the respect given foreign proceedings and judgments.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2012
Spring 2012
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

501.01 3 Yuko Nishitani Tu/Th 1:30-2:51 pm Tu/Th 1:30-2:51 pm Room 4055
This course is addressed to students preparing themselves to represent international interests in American courts, or their possible adversaries. Among the topics examined are (1) judicial jurisdiction to enforce American law on foreign firms or citizens doing business with Americans; (2) federal judicial jurisdiction over foreign governments and their citizens or to enforce international law; (3) discovery of evidence abroad and assistance to foreign courts seeking information in the United States; and (4) the respect given foreign proceedings and judgments.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.