564 Combatants & Civilians: The History of Status in the Law of War From Medieval Europe to Guantanamo Bay

The central organizing principle of the jus in bello (the law of war governing the conduct of hostilities) is the distinction between combatants and non-combatants.  Combatants and Civilians: The History of Status in the Law of War From Medieval Europe to Guantanamo Bay will trace the historical development of combatant and non-combatant status in the law of war, examining in particular the constellations of (mutual and conflicting) state interests that produced that body of law.  Informed by that historical analysis, the course will then consider the meaning of the current debate on the status of “unlawful combatants” (or “unprivileged belligerents,” as restyled by the Obama administration) in the counterterrorism context and the contemporary implications of that debate

Course Type
Seminar
2018
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

564.01 2
  • Scheduled in-class examination
  • Take-home examination
  • Class participation
Madeline Morris M 2:00-3:50 PM 4044

The central organizing principle of the jus in bello (the law of war governing the conduct of hostilities) is the distinction between combatants and non-combatants.  Combatants and Civilians: The History of Status in the Law of War From Medieval Europe to Guantanamo Bay will trace the historical development of combatant and non-combatant status in the law of war, examining in particular the constellations of (mutual and conflicting) state interests that produced that body of law.  Informed by that historical analysis, the course will then consider the meaning of the current debate on the status of “unlawful combatants” (or “unprivileged belligerents,” as restyled by the Obama administration) in the counterterrorism context and the contemporary implications of that debate

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.