564 Combatants & Civilians: The History of Status in the Law of War From Medieval Europe to Guantanamo Bay

The central organizing principle of the jus in bello (the law of war governing the conduct of hostilities) is the distinction between combatants and non-combatants.  Combatants and Civilians: The History of Status in the Law of War From Medieval Europe to Guantanamo Bay will trace the historical development of combatant and non-combatant status in the law of war, examining in particular the constellations of (mutual and conflicting) state interests that produced that body of law.  Informed by that historical analysis, the course will then consider the meaning of the current debate on the status of “unlawful combatants” (or “unprivileged belligerents,” as restyled by the Obama administration) in the counterterrorism context and the contemporary implications of that debate

Course Type
Seminar
2018
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

564.01 2
  • Scheduled in-class examination
  • Take-home examination
  • Class participation
Madeline Morris W 2:00-3:50 PM 4172

The central organizing principle of the jus in bello (the law of war governing the conduct of hostilities) is the distinction between combatants and non-combatants.  Combatants and Civilians: The History of Status in the Law of War From Medieval Europe to Guantanamo Bay will trace the historical development of combatant and non-combatant status in the law of war, examining in particular the constellations of (mutual and conflicting) state interests that produced that body of law.  Informed by that historical analysis, the course will then consider the meaning of the current debate on the status of “unlawful combatants” (or “unprivileged belligerents,” as restyled by the Obama administration) in the counterterrorism context and the contemporary implications of that debate

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2012
Fall 2012
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

564.01 3 Charles Clotfelter M, W 1:25-2:40 pm M, W 1:25-2:40 pm 150 Sanford
Are universities the engine of economic growth, the mechanism for reproducing the ruling class, or just a summer camp with classes attached? Although we might think we know all about universities because we attend one or work at one, chances are our perspectives are limited or biased. This seminar explores what goes on in universities and what the consequences are for students and society.Course requirements: 1. All students are expected to do the assigned readings and participate in class discussion. 2. A research paper on some aspect of universities, choosing a topic and beginning work early in the term. Some possible topics are listed at the end of the syllabus. 3. One test covering the reading and class discussion. 4. Several short assignments.Higher Education NewsSign up to receive daily updates on Inside Higher Ed

Degree Requirements
None
Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.