645 Second Amendment Research Tutorial

Research Tutorials give students an opportunity to engage with the production of legal scholarship in a substantive and sustained way.  This Tutorial will explore the history of gun rights and regulation in the United States, analyze the Supreme Court’s decision in District of Columbia v. Heller, and suggest doctrinal and theoretical tools with which to implement the new “individual” right to keep and bear arms.  Students will be asked to review and evaluate chapters of a forthcoming manuscript, participate in weekly discussions, and produce research memos in response to class discussions.    Students should expect to generate roughly 20 pages of written work product throughout the semester.

Enrollment in the Second Amendment Research Tutorial is limited to 8 students and there is a selection process for students to be enrolled in the course.  Interested students must apply with a statement of interest as follows: 

In no more than a page, please explain why you would like to participate in this Research Tutorial, and what you hope to contribute.  Factors could include curiosity or strong views about the Second Amendment, interest in legal scholarship, commitment to research and writing, or other interests and qualifications.

Statements of interest must be submitted to Marlyn Dail by the close of business on Tuesday, November 8.  The Registrar's Office will manually enroll the selected students in this course during the drop/add period. 

 

Course Areas of Practice
Course Type
Research Tutorial
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge and understanding of substantive and procedural law
Legal analysis and reasoning, legal research, problem-solving, and written and oral communication in the legal context
2017
Spring 2017
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

645.01 2
  • Reflection Papers
  • Class participation
Joseph Blocher, Darrell A. H. Miller Tu 1:45-3:35 PM 3000

Research Tutorials give students an opportunity to engage with the production of legal scholarship in a substantive and sustained way.  This Tutorial will explore the history of gun rights and regulation in the United States, analyze the Supreme Court’s decision in District of Columbia v. Heller, and suggest doctrinal and theoretical tools with which to implement the new “individual” right to keep and bear arms.  Students will be asked to review and evaluate chapters of a forthcoming manuscript, participate in weekly discussions, and produce research memos in response to class discussions.    Students should expect to generate roughly 20 pages of written work product throughout the semester.

Enrollment in the Second Amendment Research Tutorial is limited to 8 students and there is a selection process for students to be enrolled in the course.  Interested students must apply with a statement of interest as follows: 

In no more than a page, please explain why you would like to participate in this Research Tutorial, and what you hope to contribute.  Factors could include curiosity or strong views about the Second Amendment, interest in legal scholarship, commitment to research and writing, or other interests and qualifications.

Statements of interest must be submitted to Marlyn Dail by the close of business on Tuesday, November 8.  The Registrar's Office will manually enroll the selected students in this course during the drop/add period. 

 

Grading Basis: Credit/No Credit

Degree Requirements
Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
By Application

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.