Course Browser

Search and explore Duke Law's wide variety of courses that comprise near every area of legal theory and practice. Contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs to confirm whether a course satisfies a graduation requirement in any particular semester.
 

NOTE: Course offerings change. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.

 

Credits
Semester
JD Course of Study
JD/LLM in International & Comparative Law
JD/LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship
International LLM - 1 year
LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship - 1 year
Certificate in Public interest and Public Service Law
 
Clear all filters22 courses found.
Course Number Course Title Course Credits Degree Requirements Semesters Taught Methods of Evaluation

250

Family Law 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM - New York Bar Exam
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Fall 18
  • Fall 16
  • Fall 17
  • Final Exam
  • Practical exercises
  • Class participation

A study of legal and policy issues relating to the family. Topics include requirements for marriage, nontraditional families, obligations at divorce, establishing parenthood, and adoption. Grading is based on a final examination, class participation, and written work relating to a visit to family court and completion of a divorce settlement exercise.

295

Trusts and Estates 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM - New York Bar Exam
  • Fall 16
  • Spring 17
  • Fall 17
  • Spring 18
  • Final Exam
  • Class participation

An examination of noncommercial property dispositions, both testamentary and inter vivos, including the following topics: intestate succession; wills and will substitutes; creation and characteristics of trusts; powers of appointment; problems in trust and estate administration.

301

AIDS and the Law 2
  • JD - general credits
  • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Fall 16
  • Fall 17
The course will explore the legal and policy landscape of the HIV/AIDS epidemic primarily in the United States. We will employ a multi-disciplinary approach to teaching about HIV law and policy, including the legal issues faced by persons with HIV disease. Speakers will include medical specialists, social workers, and persons living with HIV. Topics covered include HIV-related stigma and discrimination, HIV testing and public health laws, confidentiality and privacy rights, estate planning issues, HIV criminalization, health disparities, access to health care and health insurance, permanency planning for children and other family law issues, employee benefit issues, and torts and HIV-related private lawsuits. There is an opportunity for student presentations on AIDS Law issues. In lieu of an exam, there is a paper requirement for the course. The course is helpful but not required for those intending to enroll in the Health Justice Clinic.

This course is only offered in the fall semester.

309

Children and the Law 2
  • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP), option
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Spring 18
  • Reflection Papers
  • Final paper (10+ pages in length)

This seminar is derived from the three-credit Children and the Law course.  Where the latter is a broad survey of the law governing decision making for children and the relationship between parents and the state that arises in that context, this seminar focuses in on the three areas of the law that tend to generate the most cultural and legal controversy: education, religion, and maltreatment.  Students will be required to prepare memoranda throughout the semester on related topics including home schooling, curriculum reform, vaccination law, proxy consents to medical treatment and research, corporal punishment, and the Fourth Amendment’s special needs administrative search exception.  The course can be used to satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.  There are no prerequisites.  However, because the subject matter builds on the foundations of constitutional law, property, and torts, it will be useful to have taken these classes.

340

Estate and Gift Taxation 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits

A study of the rules governing federal taxation of gratuitous wealth transfers. Working with both statutes and cases to develop an understanding of the Estate and Gift Taxes, we will consider not only the mechanics of these two taxes (and the intertwined Generation Skipping Tax), but also their basic policies, history, and selected concepts concerning estate planning implications of transfer tax. There is no prerequisite.

345

Gender & the Law 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Spring 17
  • Spring 18
  • Final Exam
  • Reflection Papers
  • Oral presentation
  • Practical exercises
  • In-class exercise
  • Class participation

This survey course examines topics in law relating to gender through a series of different theoretical perspectives. Topics include employment, the family, domestic violence, school sports, sexual harassment, pornography, prostitution, rape, affirmative action, women in legal practice, pregnancy, and sexual identity. Some film is used in class. Evaluation is by an end-of-term exam and three short "reaction papers."

398

Juvenile Courts & Delinquency 2
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Final Exam

This course examines legal responses to minors who break the law. It opens with a discussion of the development of the American juvenile court, which can be divided into three periods, beginning with the establishment of the Chicago Juvenile Court in 1899. It considers jurisdictional issues—when does the juvenile court have the authority to act? When and how do adult criminal courts assert jurisdiction over minors?—as well as questions concerning the application of traditional criminal law rules and doctrines, particularly those regarding the mens rea requirement, to offenses by minors. It explores the law that governs investigatory encounters and pretrial procedures as well as pre-adjudication processes (i.e., intake and detention) in the context of juvenile court. It then examines modern juvenile court practice, adjudication, and disposition with a discussion of the role of lawyers for children in delinquency matters.

Taking this courses affords the opportunity to delve deeper by enrolling concurrently in Law 692, Juvenile Courts Practicum.

399

Forensic Psychiatry 2
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Spring 17
  • Spring 18

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the major areas of interface between psychiatry and law. Basic concepts of clinical psychiatry and psychopathology will be highlighted throughout the course. The attorney and the psychiatrist roles in the commitment process, right to treatment and right to refuse treatment, competency to stand trial, and criminal responsibility will be explored using a number of methods. Discussion of assigned readings, short lectures, interviews and observation of patients involved in legal proceedings, films, guest speakers, and field trips will form the basis of the course. The students will periodically be asked to use the information from the course together with independent and group research to complete short projects and class exercises.

400

Health Justice Clinic 4-6
  • JD - general credits
  • JD - experiential learning
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Public Interest Certificate: Experiential Requirement
  • Fall 18
  • Fall 16
  • Spring 17
  • Fall 17
  • Spring 18
  • Journal
  • Practical exercises
  • Live-client representation and case management
  • Class participation

This course is an in-house legal clinic in which students provide legal representation for persons with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and other serious health conditions. Under the close supervision of clinical instructors, students represent clients in cases that are related to the client's health condition, including: estate planning (wills, living wills, health care powers of attorney, powers of attorney); government benefits (Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security Disability); permanency planning for children; health and disability insurance; guardianship; health-related discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations; health information privacy; and other civil cases related to health. Students are certified under North Carolina's Student Practice Rules.

Classroom work consists of a day-long intensive training at the beginning of the semester as well as a weekly, two-hour seminar focusing on substantive law, lawyering skills, and health disparities and stigma. Students also meet individually with clinic instructors each week. Each student carries an individual case load and is required to meet a minimum hours requirement. The course is offered for 4, 5, or 6 credits, with hour requirements of 100, 125, and 150 respectively.

AIDS and the Law is recommended, but not required for enrollment in the clinic. This clinic is offered each semester. Students must be at least in their second semester, second year to take this clinic, because of the requirements of the Student Practice Rules.

Clinics Enrollment Policy

Important:

  • Students are required to attend the day-long clinic intensive training session.  Students who have previously completed a clinic may skip the morning portion of the intensive.
  • International LLM students who wish to enroll in a clinic must seek the permission of the clinic's faculty director prior to the enrollment period. Permission is required to enroll but permission does not constitute entry into the clinic.
  • Course website
  • ** Variable Credits 4-6 **

Ethics Requirement

Students are required to have instruction in the Model Rules of Professional Conduct prior to, or during, enrollment in the Health Justice Clinic. The following ethics classes meet the requirement: Ethics of Social Justice Lawyering (LAW 237), Ethics and the Law of Lawyering (LAW 238), Ethics and the Law of Lawyering in Civil Litigation (LAW 239), Criminal Justice Ethics (LAW 317) and Ethics in Action (LAW 539).

Enrollment Pre/co-requisite

Any ethics course (Law 237, Law 238, Law 239, Law 317, or Law 539)

401

Advanced Health Justice Clinic
  • JD - general credits
  • JD - experiential learning
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Public Interest Certificate: Experiential Requirement
  • Fall 18
  • Fall 16
  • Spring 17
  • Fall 17
  • Spring 18
  • Live-client representation and case management

Available to students who wish to participate for a second semester in the Health Justice Clinic. Students enrolled in advanced clinical studies are required to participate fully in the case work portion of the clinic, performing 50 or 100 hours of client representation work, depending on number of credits selected (50 hours = 1 credit; 100 hours = 2 credits), but will not be required to attend the class sessions. Consent of Director of Clinic required.

402

HIV / AIDS Policy Clinic 3
  • JD - general credits
  • JD - experiential learning
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Public Interest Certificate: Experiential Requirement
  • Fall 18
  • Spring 17
  • Fall 17
  • Spring 18
  • Reflection Papers
  • Final paper (10+ pages in length)
  • Group project
  • Class participation

Students in this clinic will focus on policy work rather than direct client representation. Students will work on policy initiatives aimed at increasing access to quality, comprehensive health care for low-income individuals living with chronic illnesses like HIV/AIDS. The policy work will focus on barriers to access to care and prevention, including implementation of health care reform in North Carolina, funding disparities throughout the Southern US, HIV-related stigma, criminalization of HIV, and access to HIV medications.. Students will work to inform policy recommendations and advocacy strategies at the national, regional, state and county levels in executive, legislative and regulatory arenas. Over the course of a semester, students can expect to accumulate a wealth of hands-on experience in current and emerging health policy issues on the state and federal level. Students will conduct legal and fact-based research to inform policy recommendations, produce in-depth reports, comment letters, presentations to policy makers, and draft legislation or regulatory guidance. Each student will focus on particular policy project(s) and will be required to spend a minimum of 100 hours on their clinic project(s). We will have regular group meetings with students and clinic faculty throughout the semester.

Clinics Enrollment Policy

IMPORTANT:
Instructor permission is required for enrollment in the AIDS Policy Clinic. This course may not be dropped after the first class meeting.

Instructor Permission Required for Enrollment
To enroll in the Clinic, you must have successfully completed at least two semesters of Law School and have instructor permission. It is helpful to have had experience working on HIV/AIDS or other health health policy or related issues, or to have taken AIDS and the Law and/or the AIDS Legal Assistance Project.

404

Advanced HIV/AIDS Policy Clinic
  • JD - experiential learning
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Public Interest Certificate: Experiential Requirement
  • Spring 18
  • Final paper (10+ pages in length)
  • Reflection Papers
  • Group project
  • Class participation

This clinic provides an opportunity for students who want to do advanced work after completing the HIV/AIDS Policy Clinic. Variable Credit.

470

Poverty Law 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Spring 17
  • Spring 18
  • Final Exam

This course provides an introduction to the relationship between law and poverty, including the relevance of legal doctrine, policy and practice to the significant inequality in income, assets and basic social goods impacting tens of millions of people in the United States.

We will begin by considering historical and contemporary trends in domestic poverty, U.S. social welfare policy, the legal framework under which poverty-related claims have been adjudicated, and the role of lawyers in combatting poverty.

Grounded in poverty data, policy arguments, legal doctrine and practice, we will explore modern government anti-poverty programs and issues such as welfare, work, housing, health, education and criminalization.

We will conclude by considering non-governmental approaches to combating poverty, including market-based solutions and international human rights, with an emphasis on the role of law, lawyers and legal institutions in such efforts.

Drawing on the rich expertise of those in Durham and beyond, we will occasionally be joined by guest speakers. The primary textbook for the course is Poverty Law, Policy and Practice (Aspen/Wolters Kluwer, 2014).

512

Medicine and Law 2
  • JD - general credits
  • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
    This 2-credit seminar considers the application of law to medicine and the tensions that arise as a result, both in practice and as these tensions implicate differences between medical ethics and legal norms. The topics covered will include the history and modern status of medical ethics rules and the institutions that govern and operationalize them; medical privacy in the HIPAA context; clinical research and the consent process; the (medical malpractice) standard of care and medical errors; scarce resources including medicines and organs; infectious disease (e.g., Ebola) protocols; living wills and medical powers of attorney; the concept of medical "futility"; and choosing and defining death.

    Grades will be based on class preparedness and participation including one-page reflection papers due before most class sessions, and a final research paper. In total, students will turn in ten reflection papers, i.e., one for each of ten of the thirteen class sessions. Final papers for those not taking the class for writing credit must be 20-25 pages in length. Final papers for those taking the class for writing credit must be between 25 and 30 pages in length and must otherwise comply with the requirements for obtaining such credit.

    It is recommended that students take this course in conjunction with Law 524, Health and Medical Research for Lawyers, a one-credit advanced research seminar which emphasizes the topics covered in this course, i.e., in Law 512.

    571

    The Changing Face of Marriage and Family: Pastoral and Legal Perspectives 2
    • JD - general credits
    • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
    • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
    • Reflection Papers
    • Class participation

    This seminar examines areas in which religion and law intersect in family life. Students will explore the guidelines and doctrine governing religious and legal professionals when counseling individuals on family issues. Seminar discussions will focus on interdisciplinary readings, as well as exercises in skills relating to listening, counseling, mediation, and collaboration. Grading will be based on 4-6 written assignments totaling 25-30 pages relating to class exercises or readings, and on participation in class discussion and exercises. There is no exam. The seminar fulfills the J.D. Professional Skills requirement.

    583

    Globalization of the Family 2
    • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
    • JD - general credits
    • LLM-ICL - general credits
    • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
    • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
      • Final research paper (25+ pages in length)
      • Class participation

      This course will address a number of issues in which globalization plays a role in family life, such as the definition of marriage and family, property rights, the requirements for divorce, same-sex relationships, marriage tourism, fertility tourism, adoption, and intercountry child custody disputes. In most instances, the seminar will examine a particular topic through the lens of the law of a given culture or country, so that students can focus closely on the substantive issues. In addition, the seminar will explore questions of comparative law and conflict of laws as students consider whether and how one nation should honor the family law of another. Issues of international law, including treaty obligations and human rights laws, will be considered where appropriate.

      There are no prerequisites for the course. Students enrolling in this course may not have taken the version of the course taught by Professor Michaels in the Asia-America Institute in Transnational Law during summer of 2012, nor may they take the similar course to be taught by Professor Bradley in the Duke-Geneva Institute in Transnational Law during the summer of 2013.

      Students will be required to attend and actively participate in the seminar discussion, lead class discussion for one class meeting, and complete a 30-page research paper. Students may use this research paper to fulfill the upper-level or the LLM writing requirement, and the special writing requirement for JD/LLMs

      587

      Race and the Law 2
      • JD - general credits
      • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
      • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
      • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
      • Spring 17
      • Final research paper (25+ pages in length)

      Are we a post-racial society? Is English-only the way to go? Is there a model minority? Are Native American children better off with Native American parents? Should affirmative action be abolished? Are all women white and all blacks men? Was Brown right? This seminar will explore the historical and contemporary treatment of race in the United States by both the courts and the legislature. The seminar will employ an interdisciplinary approach to examining the social and political forces that have and continue to contribute to the development of legal doctrine in the areas of education, employment, health care, interracial sex and marriage, and public accommodations, among other things. Throughout, the seminar will explore the definition of race, the intersection of race and gender, the interplay of race and class, the juxtaposition of various racial groups, and the utility of a biracial dichotomy in a multiracial and multiethnic society. Materials will include cases, films, law review articles, excerpts from books, and other nonlegal materials. The seminar will examine race from a multiracial, multiethnic perspective. Participation from a diverse group of students is encouraged. A paper will be required.

      593

      Sexuality and the Law 2
      • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
      • JD - general credits
      • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
      • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
      • Fall 16
      • Spring 18
      • Final paper (10+ pages in length)
      • Midterm
      • Class participation

      Issues in the legal regulation of sexuality are among the most contested in US law today.  Determining a) whether gays and lesbians are entitled to the same marriage rights as heterosexual couples, b) whether the gender identities of transgender persons are to be accepted in public facilities like restrooms, c) if and when women should have access to contraception or abortion, and d) whether LGBTQ persons can rely on constitutional and statutory provisions providing for equal protection or nondiscrimination when availing of government provided services or commercial services, are all questions which either have been litigated in US courts in recent years, or are currently being litigated.  Assessing the merits of the arguments of parties involved in litigating these issues requires delving into the disparate areas of law which converge in these cases.  These areas of law include the jurisprudences of liberty, privacy, equal protection and the free exercise of religion, as well as issues concerning the extent of executive authority.  This course will explore these issues through an examination of recent US jurisprudence, as well as statutory law and regulatory actions, as they pertain to LGBTQ rights and women’s reproductive rights at both the state and national level.  While the primary focus will be on developments in the US, the treatment of similar issues in selected foreign jurisdictions will be introduced occasionally to present alternative approaches.

      598

      Family Creation: A Non-Judicial Perspective 2
      • JD - general credits
      • JD – Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP), add-on credit
      • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
      • LLM-ICL - writing requirement, option
      • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
      • International LLM - writing requirement, option
      • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
      • Spring 17
      • Reflection Papers
      • In-class exercise
      • Class participation

      This course will focus on the role of the legislative and administrative process in intercountry adoption, wherein a child born in one country becomes part of a family in another.  Intercountry adoption raises complex issues of law and policy, including those relating to the definition of family, state sovereignty, immigration and citizenship, human rights, and ethics and transparency.  Not all countries participating in intercountry adoption are subject to international treaties regarding adoption and related issues.  In nations where the treaties are in effect, implementation through the legislative and administrative process has been characterized by conflict and delay.  At the local level, regulation of intercountry adoption through oversight of adoption agencies and adoptive families, has been uneven.

      This seminar aims to give students the opportunity to understand the policymaking process by closely examining what has transpired in the field of intercountry adoption in the last 15-20 years, and considering what the future may hold, both within the U.S. and abroad.  Students will be expected to explore and understand the intersection between policy, treaty, and national law, as well as the interrelationship between the legislative and administrative processes.  Because the seminar will examine not only the law within the U.S. but that in other countries, students will be able to explore the differences in culture and policy that exist nation to nation and consider how those differences affect an inherently international issue such as intercountry adoption.

      Readings will draw from the United States and international sources and will include existing and proposed legislation, existing and proposed administrative regulations, treaty provisions, court decisions interpreting these sources, academic and journalistic writings, and audiovisual materials.

      618

      Readings: Introduction to Health Law & Policy – What’s a Needle? and Other Foundational Questions 1
      • JD - general credits
      • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
      • Fall 18
      • Fall 17
      • Reflection Papers
      • Class participation

      This course offers a very broad yet brief introduction to the diverse and growing field of health law.  Team taught by six different instructors, this course designed both as a general overview to “everything you wanted to know about health law but were afraid to ask” as well as a gateway to Duke’s other offerings in health law and health policy.

      692

      Juvenile Courts and Delinquency Practicum / COURSE PLUS 1
      • JD - general credits
      • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
      • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
      This is another course-plus offering to be associated with the Juvenile Courts and Delinquency course to be offered for the second time here this spring by Tamar Birckhead of UNC. Professor Birckhead teaches a Juvenile Justice clinic at UNC, so this course-plus draws on some of the clinical-type training she routinely provides her UNC students. The course offers the students the opportunity to attend Juvenile Court sessions and use what they observe in those sessions in simulation and written exercises.

      704

      Elder Law 2
      • JD - general credits
      • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
      • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
      • Final Exam

      This course focuses on the fundamental issues in elder law. The topics range from broad ethical issues (representation, capacity) to an examination of specific laws and practices to assist clients in planning for retirement, possible incapacity, and death. Tax rules governing trusts and estates play important roles in such planning; we will draw on relevant tax laws as needed. Specific topics covered include: special needs trusts and other planning tools for incapacity; guardianships; wills and trusts; Medicare and Medicaid; health care decision-making; long-term care; and social security/income support.