Course Browser

Search and explore Duke Law's wide variety of courses that comprise near every area of legal theory and practice. Contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs to confirm whether a course satisfies a graduation requirement in any particular semester.
 

NOTE: Course offerings change. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.

 

Credits
Semester
JD Course of Study
JD/LLM in International & Comparative Law
JD/LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship
International LLM - 1 year
LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship - 1 year
Certificate in Public interest and Public Service Law
 
Clear all filters8 courses found.
Course Number Course Title Course Credits Degree Requirements Semesters Taught Methods of Evaluation

200

Administrative Law 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM - New York Bar Exam
  • International LLM, Environmental Law Certificate
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  1. Fall 16
  2. Spring 17
  3. Fall 17
  4. Spring 18
  5. Fall 18
  6. Spring 19
  • Final Exam

A study of the legal framework governing administrative agencies under the U.S. Constitution and the Administrative Procedure Act, with a particular focus on agency rulemaking and adjudication; Presidential power; Congressional control of agencies through statutes and other mechanisms of oversight; and judicial review of agency actions.

207

Sports and the Law 3
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-LE (1 year) - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • International LLM, Business Law Certificate
  1. Spring 17
  2. Spring 18
  3. Spring 19
  • Final Exam

Sports occupies a central place in modern society. It constitutes a significant sector in the economy and an important form of cultural expression. This course examines the legal relations among the various parties in sports at both the professional and amateur levels. Particular attention will be given to the importance given to the maintenance of competitive balance and its impact on traditional notions of competition that apply in other business settings. Contracts law, antitrust law, and labor law provide the essential core for the investigation of issues in this course. In addition, this course seeks to provide an informed perspective on the financial and business structures that define the industry.

232

Employment Discrimination 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  1. Spring 17
  2. Spring 18
  3. Spring 19
  • Final Exam

A study of the law of employment discrimination, focusing mainly on the federal law that prohibits discrimination based on race, sex, age, religion, and disability. Issues of both practice and theory are discussed.

265

First Amendment 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM - New York Bar Exam
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  1. Fall 16
  2. Fall 17
  3. Fall 18
  • Final Exam

This course examines the legal doctrines, theories, and arguments arising out of the free speech and religion clauses of the First Amendment.

285

Labor Law 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  1. Fall 16
  2. Fall 17
  3. Fall 18
  • Final Exam

The course examines the basic principles of labor law: a body of rulings, regulations, and legislative acts governing the rights of workers to form a union and collectively bargain over workplace terms and conditions. It focuses on the major federal legislation in this area - the National Labor Relations Act - as opposed to other laws governing workplace conduct (wage-hour, anti-discrimination, etc.), state laws, or those pertaining to public sector employees. The class covers the history of the Act, who is covered under its provisions, the jurisdiction of the National Labor Relations Board and judicial review of its actions, how unions are formed, collective bargaining, unfair labor practices and the procedures to remedy same, and economic weapons used in labor disputes (strikes, boycotts, lock-outs, etc.).  The class also analyzes labor law from a multi-disciplinary perspective, with attention given to psychology, economic history, politics, and emerging cultural trends (the rise of social media as a means of union organizing, for example). It is taught using a combination of lecture, case analysis, and classroom simulations. It is the goal of this course to provide the student a firm grounding in the basics of labor law, with a practical appreciation of the passions labor conflict generates.

345

Gender & the Law 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  1. Spring 17
  2. Spring 18
  3. Spring 19
  • Final Exam
  • Reflection Papers
  • Oral presentation
  • Practical exercises
  • In-class exercise
  • Class participation

This survey course examines topics in law relating to gender through a series of different theoretical perspectives. Topics include employment, the family, domestic violence, school sports, sexual harassment, pornography, prostitution, rape, affirmative action, women in legal practice, pregnancy, and sexual identity. Some film is used in class. Evaluation is by an end-of-term exam and three short "reaction papers."

553

Empirical Research Methods in Law 1
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  1. Fall 16
  2. Fall 18
  • Final Exam, option
  • Final paper (10+ pages in length), option
  • In-class exercise

There are three major objectives for this course: (1) to provide you with a substantive understanding of empirical methods and an opportunity to learn the principals of these methods with hands-on experience with easy-to-use statistical software (e.g., Excel and Stata); (2) to develop skills to choose and work with experts, and the ability to develop and refute quantitative evidence; and (3) to develop the necessary skills for critical thinking and evaluation of empirical work in academic studies and expert witness reports.

The course will be divided into three major components. The first section of the course will introduce a broad range of topics in methodology, from study design and hypothesis testing to descriptive statistics and multivariate regression techniques in the context of legal issues faced by practicing attorneys. The second section will include a series of lectures by judges and empirical scholars with a wealth of experience working with and as expert witnesses. The final section of the course will utilize this new knowledge and training to critically evaluate empirical scholarship and expert reports. Together, these course components will provide you with a comprehensive background in empirical methods and will prepare you for sophisticated and critical consumption of statistical analyses. The course also will equip those of you who are interested in pursuing academia with a foundation in quantitative research to produce empirical scholarship.

Participation during class is strongly encouraged, and computers are allowed in the classroom. Course grades will be based on class participation (10%), hands-on exercises (10%), and a discussion paper (80%).  For the paper, you will be asked to evaluate an Expert Report and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the study based on the research methods covered in this course. You have the option to take an in-class exam as a substitute for the paper.

 

702

Alternative Dispute Resolution 3
  • JD - general credits
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  1. Fall 16
  2. Fall 17
  3. Fall 18
  • Final Exam

This course surveys the most common types of alternative dispute resolution processes: negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and court-annexed and governmental-agency ADR -all of which have gained wide-spread use as alternatives to traditional litigation. The survey encompasses three perspectives; the advocate's perspective in choosing the most appropriate ADR process in light of the different advantages and disadvantages of the various processes; the third-party neutral's perspective in facilitating or fashioning a just resolution of the parties' dispute; and the policy maker's perspective in utilizing ADR as a more efficient and cost effective substitute for traditional adjudication.