Course Browser

Search and explore Duke Law's wide variety of courses that comprise near every area of legal theory and practice. Contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs to confirm whether a course satisfies a graduation requirement in any particular semester.
 

NOTE: Course offerings change. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.

 

Credits
Semester
JD Course of Study
JD/LLM in International & Comparative Law
JD/LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship
International LLM - 1 year
LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship - 1 year
Certificate in Public interest and Public Service Law
 
Clear all filters6 courses found.
Course Number Course Title Course Credits Degree Requirements Semesters Taught Methods of Evaluation

218

Comparative Law: Western Legal Traditions 3
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - required courses
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Fall 16
  • Fall 17
  • Final Exam

This course has two aims. On a practical level, we will learn about the differences and similarities, both real and perceived, between different legal orders. We will focus on legal orders within the "civil" and "common" law and try to find out in which way it makes sense to conceive of them as "the Western Legal Tradition". On a theoretical level, we will try to understand what it means to "compare", and how it can help us both to understand other legal systems as well as our own.

275

International Law 3
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - required courses
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  • Spring 16
  • Spring 17
  • Spring 18
  • Final Exam

This course offers a general introduction to the international legal system and provides a foundation for more specialized courses. Topics covered include the sources, actors and institutions of international law; the application of international law by U.S. courts; adjudication by international tribunals; the extraterritorial application of domestic law; and an introduction to specific topics, such as human rights, international criminal law, international trade and investment, environmental protection, and the use of force.

380

Research Methods in International, Foreign and Comparative Law 1
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - required courses
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Spring 16
  • Spring 17
  • Spring 18
  • Practical exercises
  • In-class exercise
  • Class participation
  • Other

This one-credit seminar in advanced legal research introduces students to specific sources and strategies for international, foreign, and comparative legal research. It covers key primary and secondary sources in both print and electronic formats, including freely available and subscription-based resources. The subjects examined include treaty law, the law of international organizations, European Union law, civil law and other foreign legal systems, as well as selected topics in international private law. The course emphasizes the research process, strategies, and evaluation of print and online sources in a changing information environment. This course is required for students enrolled in the J.D./LL.M. in Comparative and International Law and open to other students (2L and 3L) with the instructor's permission. The class will meet for eight 90-minute sessions. Grades will be based on in-class and take-home exercises, class participation, and a final research project.

566A

Corporation and International Law: Past, Present, and Future 3
  • JD - upper-level writing (ULWR)
  • JD - upper-level writing (ULWR), option
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - required courses
  • LLM-ICL - writing requirement
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Fall 17
  • Reflection Papers
  • Final paper (10+ pages in length)
  • Class participation

From politics to popular culture, the corporation has become one of the most critical economic, political, and cultural institutions of the modern era.  It has also been one of the most controversial.  Are corporations people, societies, or even governments? Do they have rights? If so, what are their civic, social, ethical, and political responsibilities? If such questions are vexing within municipal and national contexts, they have been downright confounding for international legal regimes.  Corporations have a global footprint and influence on our conceptions of sovereignty and governance, the functioning of international markets, the nature of interstate relations, wealth distribution, international development, and, at a basic level, the lives of people around the world. Yet modern international law has generally been understood to apply almost exclusively to states and to touch only lightly on corporate institutions, with profound consequences for everything from human rights to the global environment. This course will address these questions and many others, both through our own readings and discussions, as well as frequent guest speakers, panels, and workshops, in conjunction with a year-long Mellon Foundation funded Sawyer Seminar.

A limited number of JD students may be permitted to use their paper to satisfy the JD upper-level writing requirement with prior approval of Professor Brewster.

566B

Corporation and International Law 3
  • JD - upper-level writing (ULWR)
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - required courses
  • LLM-ICL - writing requirement
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • Spring 18
  • Reflection Papers
  • Final paper (10+ pages in length)
  • Class participation

From politics to popular culture, the corporation has become one of the most critical economic, political, and cultural institutions of the modern era.  It has also been one of the most controversial.  Are corporations people, societies, or even governments? Do they have rights? If so, what are their civic, social, ethical, and political responsibilities? If such questions are vexing within municipal and national contexts, they have been downright confounding for international legal regimes.  Corporations have a global footprint and influence on our conceptions of sovereignty and governance, the functioning of international markets, the nature of interstate relations, wealth distribution, international development, and, at a basic level, the lives of people around the world. Yet modern international law has generally been understood to apply almost exclusively to states and to touch only lightly on corporate institutions, with profound consequences for everything from human rights to the global environment. This course will address these questions and many others, both through our own readings and discussions, as well as frequent guest speakers, panels, and workshops, in conjunction with a year-long Mellon Foundation funded Sawyer Seminar.

572

International Forum Shopping: Theory and Practice 2
  • LLM-ICL - required courses
  • Spring 17

This seminar, open to students pursuing a JD-LLM in international and comparative law, analyzes institutional design, regime complexity, and forum shopping in the international legal system.  The seminar explores the theoretical, strategic, and practical issues relating to these topics.  Key concepts are illustrated via a series of recent case studies in international trade, investment, human rights, criminal law, and other area of international law.  Reading for the course will include both theoretical reading and materials specifically related to the four case studies presented.  Readings associated with the case studies may include briefs, legal decisions, newspaper and other accounts of the situation, and possibly guest lectures.

Course grades will be based 60% on response papers (6 papers of 1500 words), and 40% on class participation, including helping to lead discussion of classes for which they write response papers.

Students interested in satisfying either the JD or JD/LLM writing requirements through this seminar may separately enroll in an Independent Study (Law 460) of 1 or 2 credits.  Research papers completed through these Independent Studies will be in addition to, and not in lieu of, the required seminar response papers, and will be graded separately from the seminar work.