Course Browser

Search and explore Duke Law's wide variety of courses that comprise near every area of legal theory and practice. Contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs to confirm whether a course satisfies a graduation requirement in any particular semester.
 

NOTE: Course offerings change. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.

 

Credits
Semester
JD Course of Study
JD/LLM in International & Comparative Law
JD/LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship
International LLM - 1 year
LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship - 1 year
Certificate in Public interest and Public Service Law
 
Clear all filters5 courses found.
Course Number Course Title Course Credits Degree Requirements Semesters Taught Methods of Evaluation

242W

Social Justice Lawyering, Writing Credit 1
  • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - writing requirement
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • International LLM - writing requirement
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  1. Fall 17
  2. Fall 18
  • Final research paper (25+ pages in length)

While enrolled in Law 242 Social Justice Lawyering, with prior professor approval, students may submit a 30-page research paper and earn an additional one credit for the course.  This paper is in addition to all the other course requirements, including the five written assignments, but may be related to your case study presentation. 

The paper may be used to satisfy the upper level writing requirement, the LLM writing requirement, and/or the JD/LLM writing requirement.  You must meet with Professor Berlin or Gordon by September 1, 2017, which is the last day of the drop-add period, if you would like to seek an additional credit and if you plan to use your paper to satisfy one or more of these requirements.

558W

Foreign Anti-Bribery Writing Credit 1
  • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - writing requirement
  1. Fall 18
  • Add on credit

While enrolled in Law 558 Foreign Anti-Bribery Law, students have the option to take 1-2 additional credits in order to satisfy the JD or JD/LLM Writing Requirement. *LAW 558W MUST be added no later than 7th week of class.*

566A

Corporation and International Law: Past, Present, and Future 3
  • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
  • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP), option
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - required courses
  • LLM-ICL - writing requirement
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • International LLM, Business Law Certificate
  1. Fall 17
  • Reflection Papers
  • Final paper (10+ pages in length)
  • Class participation

From politics to popular culture, the corporation has become one of the most critical economic, political, and cultural institutions of the modern era.  It has also been one of the most controversial.  Are corporations people, societies, or even governments? Do they have rights? If so, what are their civic, social, ethical, and political responsibilities? If such questions are vexing within municipal and national contexts, they have been downright confounding for international legal regimes.  Corporations have a global footprint and influence on our conceptions of sovereignty and governance, the functioning of international markets, the nature of interstate relations, wealth distribution, international development, and, at a basic level, the lives of people around the world. Yet modern international law has generally been understood to apply almost exclusively to states and to touch only lightly on corporate institutions, with profound consequences for everything from human rights to the global environment. This course will address these questions and many others, both through our own readings and discussions, as well as frequent guest speakers, panels, and workshops, in conjunction with a year-long Mellon Foundation funded Sawyer Seminar.

A limited number of JD students may be permitted to use their paper to satisfy the JD upper-level writing requirement with prior approval of Professor Brewster.

566B

Corporation and International Law 3
  • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
  • JD - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - general credits
  • LLM-ICL - required courses
  • LLM-ICL - writing requirement
  • International LLM/Exchange/SJD - general credits
  • International LLM, Business Law Certificate
  1. Spring 18
  • Reflection Papers
  • Final paper (10+ pages in length)
  • Class participation

From politics to popular culture, the corporation has become one of the most critical economic, political, and cultural institutions of the modern era.  It has also been one of the most controversial.  Are corporations people, societies, or even governments? Do they have rights? If so, what are their civic, social, ethical, and political responsibilities? If such questions are vexing within municipal and national contexts, they have been downright confounding for international legal regimes.  Corporations have a global footprint and influence on our conceptions of sovereignty and governance, the functioning of international markets, the nature of interstate relations, wealth distribution, international development, and, at a basic level, the lives of people around the world. Yet modern international law has generally been understood to apply almost exclusively to states and to touch only lightly on corporate institutions, with profound consequences for everything from human rights to the global environment. This course will address these questions and many others, both through our own readings and discussions, as well as frequent guest speakers, panels, and workshops, in conjunction with a year-long Mellon Foundation funded Sawyer Seminar.

739

Religious Laws 2
  • JD - Substantial Research and Writing Project requirement (SRWP)
  • LLM-ICL - writing requirement
  • International LLM - writing requirement
  • Public Interest Certificate: General Elective
  1. Spring 17
  2. Spring 18
  • Final research paper (25+ pages in length)

Not all law is state law. Among the most important, and challenging, non-state law we confront today are religious laws. Among those is first and foremost Islamic law, but also Jewish law, as well as the laws of other religions like Buddhism and Hinduism. The seminar will serve as an introduction to these laws and their role in the global legal world. We will learn about the nature and structure of different religious laws. We will discuss to what extent we can call such laws laws, and whether we can compare them to each other and to state law. We will ask to what extent state law is also religious. And we will discuss the role that religious law plays for state law today.