Feature Story

ABA honors Coleman with criminal justice award

Professor James E. Coleman Jr. was honored with the Raeder-Taslitz Award from the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Criminal Justice Section in October. The award recognizes a law professor whose excellence in scholarship, teaching, or community service has made a significant contribution to promoting public understanding of criminal justice, justice and fairness in the criminal justice system, or best practices on the part of lawyers and judges.

Read about the award

News Highlights
Center for Criminal Justice & Professional Responsibility

Brains on Trial with Alan Alda - logoThe Duke Center for Criminal Justice and Professional Responsibility is devoted to the promotion of justice in criminal cases and to teaching and training students, lawyers, prosecutors, judges, and the general public to identify, remedy, and prevent the wrongful conviction of innocent people.

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Faculty
  • Sara Sun Beale portrait
    Charles L. B. Lowndes Professor of Law

    Beale teaches first year criminal law and upper-class courses in criminal justice policy and federal criminal law. Her principal academic interests include the federal government's role in the criminal justice system, the laws defining federal crimes, and various issues of criminal procedure, including prosecutorial discretion. She also researches the factors that shape public attitudes regarding crime and how those attitudes ultimately translate into legislative changes in criminal laws and procedures.

Video
  • DJCLPP Symposium 2016 | Inter- and Intra-State Disparities in Death Penalty Application

    The Duke Journal of Constitutional Law and Public Policy held its Spring 2016 symposium on the American Death Penalty After Glossip. The symposium, features several of the country's leading experts in the field, assesses the implications of the Supreme Court's 2015 decision in Glossip v. Gross, as well geographic disparities in the application of the death penalty and use of statistics in death penalty litigation. Session 2: Inter- and Intra-State Disparities in Death Penalty Application Authors: Robert J. Smith, The Eighth Amendment Project; Sherod Thaxton, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law; and, Lindsey Vann, Justice360 Moderator: Donald H. Beskind, Duke University School of Law Sponsored by the Duke Journal of Constitutional Law and Public Policy, Quarles & Brady LLP, and the Eighth Amendment Project.

  • DJCLPP Symposium 2016 | The Future of the American Death Penalty

    The Duke Journal of Constitutional Law and Public Policy held its Spring 2016 symposium on the American Death Penalty After Glossip. The symposium, features several of the country's leading experts in the field, assesses the implications of the Supreme Court's 2015 decision in Glossip v. Gross, as well geographic disparities in the application of the death penalty and use of statistics in death penalty litigation. Session 3: The Future of the American Death Penalty Authors: Douglas A. Berman, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law; Linda A. Malone, Duke University School of Law. Moderator: Henderson Hill, The Eighth Amendment Project Closing Remarks: Jonathan Robe, Editor in Chief, DJCLPP Sponsored by the Duke Journal of Constitutional Law and Public Policy, Quarles & Brady LLP, and the Eighth Amendment Project.

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