Students and faculty at the inaugural Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home Prof. Rebecca Rich at the inaugural Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home Duke Law professor Doriane L. Coleman and Marin Levy meet with students at the first Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home Duke Law professor Doriane L. Coleman and Marin Levy meet with students at the first Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home Duke Law Dean Kerry Abrams Duke Law professor Doriane L. Coleman and Marin Levy meet with students at the first Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home Duke Law professor Doriane L. Coleman and Marin Levy meet with students at the first Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home Duke Law professor Doriane L. Coleman and Marin Levy meet with students at the first Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home Duke Law professor Doriane L. Coleman and Marin Levy meet with students at the first Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home Duke Law professor Doriane L. Coleman and Marin Levy meet with students at the first Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home Duke Law professor Doriane L. Coleman and Marin Levy meet with students at the first Duke Law Women event at Prof. Lisa Kern Griffin's home

We are Duke Law Women

 

Duke Law Women

Duke Law Women is an initiative designed to provide an integrated admissions-to-alumnae experience that recognizes both women’s essential role in the profession and their still-salient challenges. Managed by committed faculty and administrators, Duke Law Women provides a forum for professional and social programming for women students and graduates. The initiative begins as admitted applicants transition into the Duke Law community. It engages students throughout their years on campus as they prepare to become leaders in the profession. And it continues as alumnae at all stages of their careers benefit from and contribute to Duke events. Ultimately, Duke Law Women is about building a multi-generational, supportive community of mentors and colleagues.

 

 

Events

  • poster for Gender in the ClassroomGender in the Classroom

    There is an established body of research showing that gender is relevant in the classroom, including in the law school classroom. This research tells us that male students volunteer in class more often and more quickly than female students, and that faculty call on male students more than on female students. Faculty are also more likely to know male students’ names and to engage them in more abstract and longer interactions. When female students do speak, they are more likely to use gendered speech patterns including uptalking and the use of hesitant or “polite” prefatory language that has sidelining effects. Finally, research shows that women are less likely than men to go to office hours and to take advantage of faculty mentoring opportunities.  Sponsored by Duke Law Women, this program brought women faculty and students, both female and male, together to explore this research, the Duke-in experience, and strategies for breaking down these gender-linked dynamics.

 

In the News

 

Duke Law’s setting on Duke University’s campus together with an emphasis on high-level intellectual engagement, knowledge in the service of society, and a collaborative, respectful learning environment make for a truly special experience. Students are happy, creative, productive, and collegial. They are valued as individuals and supported by their peers and by the faculty. Students and professors spend their working days together in the building, teaching and learning the tools that make for good lawyers, and challenging one another to produce useful and excellent work. Drawn to the most complicated legal problems of our time, students recognize that collaborative efforts often lead to the most successful outcomes. Perhaps it is because of this approach that women — 50% of the 1L class — flourish at Duke Law School, and very frequently assume important leadership positions in student organizations, student government, oral advocacy competitions, journals, and more. It may be why six of the last nine Duke Law clerks on the U.S. Supreme Court have been women, and why countless others have successfully pursued their ambitions to build rewarding professional careers with real-world impact.


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Our Students

 

 

Community Impact

 

The relationships fostered among women during their time at Duke Law School continue to grow long after graduation. Duke Law alumnae stay connected to each other through regional programming and signature on-campus events. They serve as mentors to current students by participating in student organization programs, facilitating mock interviews, and providing guidance and support for current women students. They are an integral part of Duke Law’s recruitment efforts, joining faculty in sharing their experiences with admitted students and encouraging the next generation of women leaders to attend Duke Law. And alumnae give back to the Duke community through service in leadership roles including the Duke Law School Board of Visitors, Law Alumni Association Board of Directors, Women’s Impact Network, and Duke Women’s Forum.


Contact the Alumni Office