AI in the Administrative State: Applications, Innovations, Transparency, Adaptivity

AI in the Administrative State: Applications, Innovations, Transparency, Adaptivity

May 4, 2018 | Durham, N.C./Duke Law School

        

 

Machine learning algorithms can deliver remarkable forecasting power and speed through their abilities to learn and adapt. Artificial intelligence (AI) is being employed in the private sector to optimize production processes, supply chain management, marketing, pricing, and other business functions. But apart from national security and law enforcement, productive uses in the public sector have received less attention, despite recognition that the administrative state’s foremost challenges include efficient processing of ever-increasing amounts of data, and adapting to new information over time. At the same time that AI may warrant regulation to prevent its risks, we also should consider the value of harnessing AI to assist in improving regulation and public services.

The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law, the Duke Center on Law & Technology, the Duke Initiative for Science & Society, and the Rethinking Regulation Program at The Kenan Institute for Ethics, held this joint conference, "AI in the Administrative State: Applications, Innovations, Transparency, Adaptivity," at Duke University to explore promising uses of AI and the challenges they pose in administering diverse governmental functions involving science, technology, health and intellectual property.

For information, contact innovationpolicy@law.duke.edu.

Agenda

 

Introduction & Overviews
Introductions
Stuart Benjamin, Duke Law School, The Center for
Innovation Policy at Duke Law

Nita Farahany, Duke Law School, Duke Initiative for
Science & Society

Jeff Ward, Duke Law School, Duke Center on Law & Technology
Jonathan Wiener, Duke Law School, Rethinking Regulation Program at The Kenan Institute for Ethics
Overviews
Overview: Technology
Ed Felten, Princeton UniversitySlides
Overview: Law
Cary Coglianese, University of Pennsylvania Law SchoolSlides
Discussant:
Vince Conitzer, Duke University
Moderator: Lori Bennear, Duke University Nicholas School, Rethinking Regulation Program at The Kenan Institute for Ethics

 


Panel: Use of AI in IP-Related
Search and Classification
Panelists
Liat Belinson, AI PatentsSlides
Scott Beliveau, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
Alex Measure, Bureau of Labor Statistics,
U.S. Department of Labor

Ian Wetherbee, Google
Moderator: Arti Rai, Duke Law School, The Center for
Innovation Policy at Duke Law

 


Keynote Addresses
Marjory Blumenthal, RAND
Max Stier, Partnership for Public Service
Moderators: Stephen Merrill, The Center for Innovation
Policy at Duke Law
, and
Stuart Benjamin, Duke Law School, The Center for
Innovation Policy at Duke Law

 


Panel: AI, Automated Vehicles, and
Transportation Policy
Panelists
Lori Bennear, Duke University Nicholas School, Rethinking Regulation Program at The Kenan Institute for Ethics
Michael Clamann, Duke University
Bryant Walker Smith, University of South Carolina Law
Moderator: Jeff Ward, Duke Law School, Duke Center on
Law & Technology

Panel: AI and Biomedical Resource
Creation, Biopharmaceuticals
and Digital Health
Panelists
Sameer Antani, NIH/U.S. National Library of Medicine Slides
John Daley, Watson Health
  Slides (shared with Julie Daughtry)
Julie Daughtry, Watson Health
Nicholson Price, Michigan Law
Moderators: Nita Farahany, Duke Law School, Duke
Initiative for Science & Society
, and
Arti Rai, Duke Law School, The Center for Innovation
Policy at Duke Law

Concluding Thoughts
J.B. Ruhl, Vanderbilt LawSlides
Moderator: Jonathan Wiener, Duke Law School, Rethinking Regulation Program at The Kenan Institute for Ethics
Group discussion