Students, faculty, and alumni run to raise PILF money

December 3, 2008Duke Law News

Dec. 2, 2008 – A group of Law School faculty, students, and alumni ran the McDonald’s Half-Marathon – and a few ran the full, 26-mile SunTrust Marathon – in Richmond, Va., to raise money for the Public Interest Law Foundation on Nov. 15.

Student organizer Greg Dixon ’10 said the group raised between $2,000 and $3,000 for PILF, a student-run non-profit which gives grants to students doing public interest work. Law firm Davis Polk & Wardwell sponsored the runners, who also raised money from friends and family.

Professor James Boyle, Center for the Study of the Public Domain Director Jennifer Jenkins ’97, and Visiting Assistant Professor Zephyr Teachout ’99 all finished the half-marathon, along with Bethan Haaga ’10, Lily Li ’11(8K), Daniel Narvey ’11, Bettina Roberts ’10, Jonathan Ross ’11, Sarah Ludington ’92, and Dixon.

James Pearce ’11, Adam Pechtel ’10, Xiaolu Zhu ’09, and Amanda Guzman ’10 all ran the full marathon, with Pearce and Pechtel qualifying for the Boston Marathon in April.

Forty-three members of the Duke Law community also ran and walked the Al Buehler Trail in Duke Forest on Oct. 25, raising $300 for PILF.
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