ABA John J. Curtin, Jr., Justice Fund

December 17, 2009Duke Law News

The Curtin Justice Fund Legal Internship Program is managed jointly by the ABA Commission on Homelessness and Poverty and the Standing Committee on Legal Aid and Indigent Defendnts. The program will pay a $2,500 stipend to law school students who spend the summer months working for a bar association or legal services program designed to prevent homelessness or assist homeless or indigent clients or their advocates. The Legal Internship Program will provide much-needed legal assistance to organizations serving the under-represented and give students direct experience in a public interest forum. Through this, it aims both to help homless clients and to encourage careers in the law that further the goals of social justice.

The ideal intern will have a demonstrated interest in public interest law and experience working with poor people or on issues affecting them. All law students are eligible, and first year students are encouraged to apply. The intern must commit no less than eight continuous weeks between May 1 and October 1 to the program of his or her choice. Applicants must submit the application to the Curtin Internship Program, American Bar Association Commission on Homlessness and Poverty, 740 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005. All applications must be received by Friday, March 26, 2010. We welcome early submissions.
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