Schwarcz testifies before Senate securities and investment subcommittee, May 18

May 16, 2011Duke Law News

Professor Steven L. Schwarcz testified on the state of the securitization markets before the Subcommittee on Securities, Insurance, and Investment of the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs on May 18.

Read or download Schwarcz's written testimony and written answers to subsequent questions.

The Stanley A. Star Professor of Law & Business, Schwarcz is a leading scholar of international finance and capital markets, bankruptcy, and commercial law, areas to which he brings the unique perspective of having been a leading practitioner as well as a scholar. Prior to joining the Duke faculty in 1996, he was a partner at the law firm of Shearman & Sterling and then a partner and practice group chairman at Kaye Scholer, where he represented many of the world’s leading banks and other financial institutions in structuring innovative capital market financing transactions, both domestic and international. He also helped to pioneer the field of asset securitization, and his book, Structured Finance, A Guide to the Principles of Asset Securitization (3d edition with supplements), is one of the most widely used texts in the field.

Schwarcz has published extensively on issues relating to the financial crisis and financial regulatory reform, and is the author of one of the leading articles on systemic risk. In March he delivered a lecture titled “Protecting Investors in Securitization Transactions: Does Dodd-Frank Help, or Hurt?” as the 2011 Diane Sanger Memorial Lecture at the Georgetown University Law Center.

Schwarcz will be available for media interviews on May 19. For more information, contact Frances Presma at (919) 613-7248.
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