International Week has Arrived!

September 7, 2007Duke Law News

International Week, one of the Law School’s most popular annual events, is scheduled for October 22-26, 2007. The week’s activities include individual and panel presentations and discussions on current international legal topics, special food offerings and activities, and a culture and talent show. The Cultural Extravaganza, held mid-week, offers students and groups the opportunity to showcase both their culture and their talent. Past events have included singers, dancers, instrumentalists and children from different countries sporting their traditional garments.

The week is highlighted by the Food Fiesta held on Friday evening. Competition is keen among dozens of cooks and bakers entering dishes in categories such as Best Noodle Dish, Best Dessert and Best Dish on a Public Interest Salary. If you would like to enter a dish in the Food Fiesta you can sign up here.

For more details check out the full International Week 2007 Agenda

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