Highly cited

June 4, 2012Duke Law News

The works of several Duke Law faculty scholars are among the most cited law review articles of all time and in specific subject areas, according to a new study.

In a new essay published in the Michigan Law Review, law librarians Fred R. Shapiro of Yale Law School and Michelle Pearse of Harvard Law School update Shapiro’s 1985 and 1996 studies of the most-cited law review articles using research tools that, they note, maximize the accuracy of their results. Works by Professors H. Jefferson Powell, Katharine T. Bartlett, Curtis A. Bradley, Laurence R. Helfer, and Steven L. Schwarcz appear in the lists of the 100 most-cited law reviews of all time, the 100 most-cited articles of the last 20 years, and additional rankings of most cited law review articles in some specific subject areas, with numbers of citations noted, as follows:

Most-Cited Law Review Articles of All Time
Compiled by Fred R. Shapiro


71. 732 H. Jefferson Powell, The Original Understanding of Original Intent, 98 Harv. L.
Rev.
885 (1985).

Most-Cited Law Review Articles of Recent Years (Five Most-Cited Articles by Year of Publication for Each Year from 1990 to 2009) Compiled by Fred R. Shapiro
1990:

4. 553 Katharine T. Bartlett, Feminist Legal Methods, 103 Harv. L. Rev. 829 (1990).

1997:
1. 468 Curtis A. Bradley & Jack L. Goldsmith, Customary International Law as Federal Common Law: A Critique of the Modern Position, 110 Harv. L. Rev. 815 (1997).

2005:
5. 176 Curtis A. Bradley & Jack L. Goldsmith, Congressional Authorization and the War on Terrorism, 118 Harv. L. Rev. 2047 (2005).

2008:
2. 110 Steven L. Schwarcz, Systemic Risk, 97 Geo. L.J. 193 (2008).

Most-Cited Law Review Articles in Selected Subjects
Compiled by Fred R. Shapiro


Family Law:
7. 326 Katharine T. Bartlett, Rethinking Parenthood as an
Exclusive Status: The Need for Legal Alternatives When
the Premise of the Nuclear Family Has Failed, 70 Va.
L. Rev.
879 (1984).

International Law:
1. 471 Curtis A. Bradley & Jack L. Goldsmith, Customary
International Law as Federal Common Law: A Critique
of the Modern Position, 110 Harv. L. Rev. 815 (1997).

6. 294 Laurence R. Helfer & Anne-Marie Slaughter, Toward a
Theory of Effective Supranational Adjudication, 107
Yale L.J. 273 (1997).

View "The Most-Cited Law Review Articles of All Time,” 110 Mich. Law Rev. 1483.

See also, “The Citation Superstars of International Law.”
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