Job Announcement: Clinical Fellow/Supervising Attorney, International Human Rights Clinic, Duke University School of Law

March 9, 2017Duke Law News

Duke Law seeks to fill a Clinical Fellow/Supervising Attorney position in its International Human Rights Clinic beginning in the Summer of 2017.

Duke Law has deep faculty, student and institutional engagement in human rights and international law. In addition to its International Human Rights Clinic launched in the Spring of 2014, the law school is home to a Center for International and Comparative Law and a Center on Law, Ethics, and National Security. It offers a joint JD-LLM in international and comparative law, has many student organizations relating to international law, and publishes the student-edited Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law.

The Clinical Fellow/Supervising Attorney will work closely with the Director of the International Human Rights Clinic. She or he will primarily help supervise student fieldwork in Clinic projects and participate in the planning and teaching of the Clinic advocacy seminar. The Clinical Fellow/Supervising Attorney will also work closely with the Director and other faculty to expand Duke Law’s experiential learning opportunities in international law, including through student placements in competitive summer and semester fellowships and externships in human rights and related fields. The individual appointed to the position will receive mentorship in teaching, scholarship, and human rights lawyering and will have an opportunity to work with the faculty affiliated with the Center for International and Comparative Law.

Applicants should have a minimum of two to five years of relevant experience. In addition to a record of, or demonstrated potential for, clinical teaching, advocacy, and intellectual engagement, the ideal candidate will have experience: as practicing lawyers or human rights advocates, developing practice- oriented courses, supervising students in fellowships or externships, working collaboratively with faculty, and other evidence of in-depth knowledge of and practical engagement in international human rights law and mechanisms.

The initial term of the appointment is expected to be two years. Salary and benefits will be commensurate with experience and competitive with similar fellowship positions at other top U.S. law schools.

Applicants should send a statement of interest and CV to Ali Prince at ali.prince@law.duke.edu by April 16, 2017.

Duke University and Duke University Health System is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer committed to providing employment opportunity without regard to an individual's race, color, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, genetic information, veteran status, or disability.

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