Videos tagged with Civil Rights

  • Jocelyn Simonson is a Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School and author of Radical Acts of Justice: How Ordinary People are Dismantling Mass Incarceration. Simonson's scholarship explores bottom-up interventions in the criminal legal system, such as bail funds, copwatching, courtwatching, and participatory defense, asking how these real-life interventions should inform our conceptions of the design of criminal justice institutions, the discourse of constitutional rights, and the meaning of democratic justice. This Q&A and discussion was moderated by Professor Brandon Garrett.

  • Novel Justice is a book event series sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. We invite authors to discuss recently published criminal justice books and engage in Q&A with faculty and students. Nicholas Dawidoff is the critically acclaimed author of five books, including The Catcher Was a Spy and In the Country of a Country. He is a Pulitzer Prize finalist and has also been a Guggenheim, Berlin Prize, and Art for Justice Fellow.

  • The Center for International and Comparative Law welcomes Kal Raustiala, UCLA, to discuss his new book, "The Absolutely Indispensable Man: Ralph Bunche, the United Nations, and the Fight to End Empire."

  • Duke Law Professor James (Jim) E. Coleman Jr., the 2022 recipient of the Raphael Lemkin Rule of Law Guardian Medal from the Bolch Judicial Institute, will be honored during a program (live-streamed here) at 12:30 p.m. EDT on Sept. 7, 2022. In addition to receiving a medal, Professor Coleman will talk with David F. Levi, director of the Bolch Judicial Institute, about his distinguished career as a criminal defense attorney and civil rights leader.

    ABOUT PROFESSOR COLEMAN

  • What is critical race theory, or 'CRT,' and why in the last few years did this decades old academic concept suddenly come under attack in the halls of Congress and local school board meetings? Three law professors whose expertise and scholarship are at the forefront of race and the law provide answers in this special two-part series of the Duke Law Podcast:

  • What is critical race theory, or 'CRT,' and why in the last few years did this decades old academic concept suddenly come under attack in the halls of Congress and local school board meetings? Three law professors whose expertise and scholarship are at the forefront of race and the law provide answers in this special two-part series of the Duke Law Podcast:

  • Novel Justice is a book event series hosted by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. We invite authors to discuss recently published criminal justice books and to engage in Q&A with faculty and students. Dr. Jessica Simes is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University. Her work contributes to sociological research on racial inequality, mass incarceration, the conditions of prison confinement, and the social structure of cities. Her book, Punishing Places: The Geography of Mass Incarceration, applies a unique spatial analysis to mass incarceration in the United States.

  • Ian Haney Lopez, a racial justice scholar and the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Public Law at the University of California, Berkeley, spoke to students as part of Duke Law's "Race and the Law" course and speaker series. The course was offered during the 2021 spring semester and taught by Duke Law's Trina Jones, the Jerome M. Culp Professor of Law; Guy-Uriel Charles, the Edward and Ellen Schwarzman Professor of Law; and, H. Timothy Lovelace, Jr., the John Hope Franklin Research Scholar and Professor of Law.

  • The Office of the Dean and Kerry Abrams host this discussion on 'Rising Anti-Asian Violence in the U.S.,' with guest speakers Robert Chang JD/MA '92, executive director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality and professor of law at the Seattle University School of Law; Stephen Lee, professor of law and associate dean for Faculty Research and Development at the UC-Irvine School of Law; and Jo-Ann Yoo, executive director of the Asian American Federation. This discussion is moderated by Bethan Eynon, director of Public Interest Careers at Duke Law.

  • Professor Darrell Miller leads a panel discussion with Suja Thomas, Peer & Sarah Pedersen Professor of Law at the University of Illinois College of Law and Brooke Coleman, Associate Dean of Research & Faculty Development and Professor of Law at Seattle University School of Law.

  • In the past year, movements to address deep racial inequities embedded in the criminal system gained greater prominence and popular support. At the forefront of these movements are leaders in North Carolina fighting the cash bail system that incarcerates people based on poverty, the racially disparate disenfranchisement of individuals for unpaid fines and fees, and the dangerous conditions facing largely black and brown people in local jails.

  • The Duke Law Center on Law, Race and Politics hosts a panel that examines the pandemic's effects on marginalized populations and considers policy interventions designed to address structural inequality.

  • A discussion and Q&A with thought leaders on the merits, issues, and trade-offs of defunding-to-reallocate budget initiatives.

    Appearing: Brandon Garrett (Duke Law), moderator; James Burch (Anti Police-Terror Project), Darrell Miller (Duke Law), and Christy Lopez (Georgetown Law), panelists.

  • Kerry Abrams, James B. Duke and Benjamin N. Duke Dean of the School of Law, hosts a conversation with Duke Law faculty members on the current state of policing throughout the United States, with an emphasis on how policies and biases impact communities of color. Panelists discuss the history of policing in the United States; address how political movements have been used to demand reform and how the current moment compares to earlier protests; the role of the law and the legal profession in maintaining the status quo; and how the law can be used to enact reforms.

  • Host David F. Levi, director of the Bolch Judicial Institute and president of The American Law Institute, and four distinguished colleagues address another ‘plague’ — police brutality and the use of excessive force — following the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor in 2020. Featuring Lori Lightfoot, mayor of Chicago; Art Acevedo, chief of the Houston Police Department; Barry Friedman, Jacob D.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss Justice Gorsuch’s interpretation of the word ‘sex’ in this decision.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and James Coleman (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss implications of the ruling for current law and future constitutional challenges.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss marginalized persons that remain excluded from the ruling’s protections.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss how the ruling might impact President Trump’s recent orders rolling back health care protections for transgender people.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss Justice Gorsuch’s opinion.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Professor Trina Jones calls the decision “a glimmer of hope” in the midst of an assault on rights.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and James Coleman (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty share their reactions to the historic decision.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty share potential insights for students in the Supreme Court’s historic decision.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law).

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty reflect on how this ruling might strengthen claims for employment discrimination.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • Brandon Winford discusses his new book, John Hervey Wheeler, Black Banking, and the Economic Struggle for Civil Rights. Wheeler was one of the civil rights movement's most influential leaders. In articulating a bold vision of regional prosperity grounded in full citizenship and economic power for African Americans, this banker, lawyer, and visionary played a leading role in the fight for racial and economic equality throughout North Carolina. Wheeler began his career as a teller at Mechanics and Farmers Bank and rose to become bank president.