Research Help

How do I...

... get resource recommendations for a specific legal topic?
Consult the list of library Research Guides to see if one is available for your topic. These research guides are authored by Duke reference librarians and highlight the best resources, in both electronic and paper formats, for a particular legal topic.
... locate titles in the Goodson Law Library or other Duke Libraries?
Use the Duke Libraries Catalog to search for books, journals, government documents, electronic resources, microforms, and audiovisual materials which are owned by the Duke University Libraries. The Advanced Search feature allows you to limit your results to only items at the Law Library.
For help locating a particular call number in the Goodson Law Library, click the "Where is This?" link in the catalog result, or consult Maps & Locations.
... search for article citations on a particular topic?
Visit Legal Databases & Links for recommended legal research databases. Popular resources for locating article citations include Index to Legal Periodicals and LegalTrac. This page also provides access to electronic looseleaf services, other law-related databases, and links to legal as well as general research sites.

For additional electronic databases in subjects other than law and legal studies, view the complete listing at More Research Databases.
... find the full text of specific journal articles in an electronic format?
If you already have an article citation and would like to retrieve the full text, search for the journal title (not article title) on the e-Journals page. The search results will display an alphabetical list of journal titles, with the closest match at the top. Select a journal title to display a list of electronic databases which contain the full text for that title. Note that a single journal title may be contained in many different databases, and that the dates of full-text coverage may vary.

(Note: Many law-related journal articles are also available in full text via LexisNexis and/or Westlaw. Because Lexis and Westlaw are available only to current members of the Duke Law community, their full-text contents are not reflected in the e-Journals search.)

If you cannot find a particular journal title in the e-Journals search page, it may not be available online in full text. Check the Duke Libraries Catalog to see if it is owned in print at the Law Library or another Duke library. If a title is not available in either electronic full-text or in print at Duke, submit an Interlibrary Loan request.
... have books or articles delivered from other Duke Libraries?
If you would like a book that is owned by another library at Duke, click the "Get This Title" link in the catalog record to request that it be sent to the Law Library. Enter your NetID and password, click "Request" under the Get It @ Duke column, and specify your desired pickup location. You will be notified by e-mail when the item arrives. Note that not all items in the catalog will provide this option for request (e.g., rare books, bound journal volumes, and reference collection materials).

Note that law students should not use the Request link for items which are available on the shelf at the Goodson Law Library. Please visit the library to retrieve these items. (You may still use the Request link for Law Library items which are currently checked out to another borrower.)

For articles from journals owned by other Duke Libraries, current Duke Law students, faculty and staff may submit an Interlibrary Loan request. Please note that this service is not available for newspaper articles which are available in full-text electronic format. See the Interlibrary Loan Frequently Asked Questions for more information.
... request books or journal articles which are not available at the Duke Libraries?
Current Duke Law students, faculty or staff may use the Interlibrary Loan form to request books or journal articles which are not available at the Duke Libraries.
... contact a reference librarian for further help?
See Ask a Librarian for contact information. Librarians are available to assist in person, over the telephone, via e-mail and instant message, and during scheduled appointments.