527 Access to Medicines: Intellectual Property and Global Public Health

This 2 credit seminar examines the law and policy governing the availability, price and development of medicines worldwide, providing an overview of the international legal frameworks, national regulations, and innovation policies affecting access to existing medicines and the development of future treatments for global health. It encourages students to critically examine current international law governing pharmaceutical innovation and to engage in efforts to improve incentives for the pharmaceutical sector to better meet global health needs. This seminar is open to non-law graduate students depending on space and prior experience. Students may take a final take-home exam or write a 30 page paper. 

Note: An additional credit is available for students writing a 45 page paper.  Students wishing to take this option should enroll in Law 527W Access to Medicines Writing Credit and must be enrolled no later than the 7th week of class.

Course Areas of Practice
Evaluation Methods
  • Final Exam, option
  • Research paper option, 25+ pages
Degree Requirements
Course Type
  • Lecture
Learning Outcomes
  • Knowledge and understanding of substantive and procedural law

Sample Syllabi

Spring 2020

2020
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Days/Times Room

527.01 2
  • Final Exam, option
  • Research paper option, 25+ pages
Jerome H. Reichman W 6:00PM - 7:50PM 4044

This 2 credit seminar examines the law and policy governing the availability, price and development of medicines worldwide, providing an overview of the international legal frameworks, national regulations, and innovation policies affecting access to existing medicines and the development of future treatments for global health. It encourages students to critically examine current international law governing pharmaceutical innovation and to engage in efforts to improve incentives for the pharmaceutical sector to better meet global health needs. This seminar is open to non-law graduate students depending on space and prior experience. Students may take a final take-home exam or write a 30 page paper. 

Note: An additional credit is available for students writing a 45 page paper.  Students wishing to take this option should enroll in Law 527W Access to Medicines Writing Credit and must be enrolled no later than the 7th week of class.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

Spring 2018

2018
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Days/Times Room

527.01 2
  • Final Exam, option
  • Research paper option, 25+ pages
Jerome H. Reichman W 6:00-7:50 PM 3000

This 2 credit seminar examines the law and policy governing the availability, price and development of medicines worldwide, providing an overview of the international legal frameworks, national regulations, and innovation policies affecting access to existing medicines and the development of future treatments for global health. It encourages students to critically examine current international law governing pharmaceutical innovation and to engage in efforts to improve incentives for the pharmaceutical sector to better meet global health needs. This seminar is open to non-law graduate students depending on space and prior experience. Students may take a final take-home exam or write a 30 page paper. 

Note: An additional credit is available for students writing a 45 page paper.  Students wishing to take this option should enroll in Law 527W Access to Medicines Writing Credit and must be enrolled no later than the 7th week of class.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

Spring 2017

2017
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Days/Times Room

527.01 2
  • Final Exam, option
  • Research paper option, 25+ pages
Jerome H. Reichman W 5:45-7:35 PM 4055

This 2 credit seminar examines the law and policy governing the availability, price and development of medicines worldwide, providing an overview of the international legal frameworks, national regulations, and innovation policies affecting access to existing medicines and the development of future treatments for global health. It encourages students to critically examine current international law governing pharmaceutical innovation and to engage in efforts to improve incentives for the pharmaceutical sector to better meet global health needs. This seminar is open to non-law graduate students depending on space and prior experience. Students may take a final take-home exam or write a 30 page paper. 

Note: An additional credit is available for students writing a 45 page paper.  Students wishing to take this option should enroll in Law 527W Access to Medicines Writing Credit and must be enrolled no later than the 7th week of class.

Syllabus: 527.01.Spring2017-syllabus.pdf163.04 KB

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

Spring 2016

2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Days/Times Room

527.01 2 Jerome H. Reichman Tu 5:45-7:35 PM 4045

This 2 credit seminar examines the law and policy governing the availability, price and development of medicines worldwide, providing an overview of the international legal frameworks, national regulations, and innovation policies affecting access to existing medicines and the development of future treatments for global health. It encourages students to critically examine current international law governing pharmaceutical innovation and to engage in efforts to improve incentives for the pharmaceutical sector to better meet global health needs. This seminar is open to non-law graduate students depending on space and prior experience. Students may take a final take-home exam or write a 30 page paper. 

Note: An additional credit is available for students writing a 45 page paper.  Students wishing to take this option should enroll in Law 527W Access to Medicines Writing Credit and must be enrolled no later than the 7th week of class.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.