567 Law, Identity and Politics Colloquium

This seminar will explore the current state of thinking about the relationship between identity, politics and legal regulation. In particular, attention will be paid during this upcoming semester to the situation in Puerto Rico.  Among the topics that will be considered are the roles that race and colonial identity have played in leading to Puerto Rico’s current political status (“foreign in a domestic sense”).  We will also consider how these factors (and others) have played into the current debt crisis that the Commonwealth is facing. In addition to Puerto Rico, we will also have discussions of other topics connecting to the broader theme of Law, Identity and Politics such as the Gender Gap in Legal Employment, the future of the Voting Rights Act, and the litigation over the Travel Ban.

Every week, students will be asked to do reaction papers to presentations by guest speakers.  These guests are a set of scholars who are doing some of the most current research on the above-mentioned topics.

The requirements for the class are completion of the reaction papers and active participation in the debates over the papers being presented. There will not be a final exam or final paper. There will be one class meeting most weeks; on one occasion though we will have two sessions.

Course Areas of Practice
Course Type
Seminar
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge and understanding of substantive and procedural law
2018
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

567.01 2
  • Reflection Papers
  • Class participation
Guy-Uriel Charles, Mitu Gulati W 4:00-5:50 PM 3000

This seminar will explore the current state of thinking about the relationship between identity, politics and legal regulation. In particular, attention will be paid during this upcoming semester to the situation in Puerto Rico.  Among the topics that will be considered are the roles that race and colonial identity have played in leading to Puerto Rico’s current political status (“foreign in a domestic sense”).  We will also consider how these factors (and others) have played into the current debt crisis that the Commonwealth is facing. In addition to Puerto Rico, we will also have discussions of other topics connecting to the broader theme of Law, Identity and Politics such as the Gender Gap in Legal Employment, the future of the Voting Rights Act, and the litigation over the Travel Ban.

Every week, students will be asked to do reaction papers to presentations by guest speakers.  These guests are a set of scholars who are doing some of the most current research on the above-mentioned topics.

The requirements for the class are completion of the reaction papers and active participation in the debates over the papers being presented. There will not be a final exam or final paper. There will be one class meeting most weeks; on one occasion though we will have two sessions.

 

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2016
Fall 2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

567.01 2 Matthew Adler, Mitu Gulati, Guy-Uriel Charles Tu 3:45-5:35 PM 3000

This research seminar will involve discussing some of the latest research at the intersection of the fields of law, politics and economics. The research papers that we will read will look at the behavior of both individuals and institutions and will examine a range of scenarios that include the analysis of optimal regulation of financial markets, how to use legal regulation to improve the treatment of refugees, the impact of law on race and gender identity, and the evaluation of legal regulation in terms of its impact on happiness.  A central theme of this semester will be the relevance of “behavioral economics” to law and policy. The instructors for this course are Guy Charles, Mitu Gulati, and Matthew Adler.  

We will invite speakers who are doing some of the most cutting edge interdisciplinary work in law to present their ongoing work to the seminar. Students will be asked to prepare, in advance, short reaction papers to the presentations by the speakers. The requirements for the class are completion of the reaction papers and active participation in the debates over the papers being presented. There will be one class meeting each week.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
Spring 2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

567.01 2 Mitu Gulati, Guy-Uriel Charles, Matthew Adler W 3:30-5:20 PM 3000

This research seminar will involve discussing some of the latest research at the intersection of the fields of law, politics and economics. The research papers that we will read will look at the behavior of both individuals and institutions and will examine a range of scenarios that include the analysis of optimal regulation of financial markets, how to use legal regulation to improve the treatment of refugees, the impact of law on race and gender identity, and the evaluation of legal regulation in terms of its impact on happiness.  A central theme of this semester will be the relevance of “behavioral economics” to law and policy. The instructors for this course are Guy Charles, Mitu Gulati, and Matthew Adler.  

We will invite speakers who are doing some of the most cutting edge interdisciplinary work in law to present their ongoing work to the seminar. Students will be asked to prepare, in advance, short reaction papers to the presentations by the speakers. The requirements for the class are completion of the reaction papers and active participation in the debates over the papers being presented. There will be one class meeting each week.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2015
Spring 2015
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

567.01 2 Mitu Gulati, Guy-Uriel Charles W 3:45-5:35 pm Room 3000
This seminar will explore the current state of thinking about the relationship between identity, politics and legal regulation. In particular, attention will be paid during this first semester to the relationships between racial and gender identity and the politics of the workplace. Within that context, the impact of Title VII over the past fifty years will be discussed. The instructors for this course plan to invite seven or eight of the leading scholars on this topic to present their current work. This year, because of the fiftieth anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, there is a great deal of new work that is being done that reflects on both the impact of the Act, but also on the type of legal regulation that is needed to tackle identity based discrimination in the future.On alternate weeks, students will be asked to do reaction papers to the presentations by the speakers. During the week preceding each presentation, a paper relating to the presentation will be discussed in class by the instructors and the students, so as to prepare for the discussion during the week prior.The requirements for the class are completion of the reaction papers and active participation in the debates over the papers being presented. There will be one class meeting each week.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2014
Spring 2014
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

567.01 2 Mitu Gulati, Guy-Uriel Charles W 3:00-4:50 pm W 3:00-4:50 pm Room 3000
This seminar will explore the current state of thinking about the relationship between identity, politics and legal regulation. In particular, attention will be paid during this first semester to the relationships between racial and gender identity and the politics of the workplace. Within that context, the impact of Title VII over the past fifty years will be discussed. The instructors for this course plan to invite seven or eight of the leading scholars on this topic to present their current work. This year, because of the fiftieth anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, there is a great deal of new work that is being done that reflects on both the impact of the Act, but also on the type of legal regulation that is needed to tackle identity based discrimination in the future.On alternate weeks, students will be asked to do reaction papers to the presentations by the speakers. During the week preceding each presentation, a paper relating to the presentation will be discussed in class by the instructors and the students, so as to prepare for the discussion during the week prior.The requirements for the class are completion of the reaction papers and active participation in the debates over the papers being presented. There will be one class meeting each week.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.