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  • Law School 3041

    Please join us for a panel discussion with Professors Maggie Lemos, Marin Levy, Darrell Miller, and Neil Siegel for a discussion of Justice Breyer's upcoming retirement from the Supreme Court. The panel discussion will cover the upcoming nomination and confirmation process, as well as what it will mean for the Court to be without Justice Breyer after this Term. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Marlen Iraheta at marleniraheta@law.duke.edu. Boxed grab-and-go lunches will be provided.

  • Law School 3041

    This event is for the Duke Law School Community only. "Supreme Court Moot: Ramirez v. Collier" Duke Law faculty will moot Texas Solicitor General Judd Stone in preparation for his oral argument for the respondent in the capital case Ramirez v. Collier. This section 1983 case will address whether the State's decision allowing the presence of Ramirez's pastor in the execution chamber, but forbidding the pastor from touching Ramirez or audibly praying, substantially burdens religious exercise, so as to require the State to justify the deprivation as the least restrictive means of advancing a compelling governmental interest. Sponsored by Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Marin Levy at levy@law.duke.edu.

  • Virtual

    The Supreme Court will hear argument in United States v. Arthrex, Inc. on March 1, 2021. The issue before the Court is the application of the Appointments Clause to judges of the Patent Trial and Appeals Board, a tribunal established by Congress in 2012 within the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The decision below by the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit held that administrative patent judges were principal officers under the Constitution. The Arthrex case focuses on the proper construction of the Appointments Clause and, more broadly, the proper role of administrative adjudication. Distinguished commentators on this program include a Federal Circuit judge and renowned academics whose scholarship has focused on the key patent, administrative, and constitutional issues. Please register here: http://bit.ly/3sk2dsq. Sponsored by The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law and the Duke Law Program in Public Law. Contact: Balfour Smith (bsmith@law.duke.edu) or Kelli Raker (kelli.raker@law.duke.edu). More at http://bit.ly/2XFtYxB.

  • Virtual

    Please join us for a panel discussion with Professors Curt Bradley, Guy Charles, Kate Evans, Stephen Sachs, and Jim Salzman on what we might expect from the Biden administration. Specific topics will include immigration, environmental policy, voting rights, the judiciary, and foreign affairs. Moderated by Marin Levy. Sponsored by the Office of the Dean and the Program in Public Law. Please register in advance here: https://bit.ly/3iMwf3H. For more information, please contact Rachel Greeson at rachel.greeson@law.duke.edu

  • Virtual

    Moderated by Guy Charles, Edward and Ellen Schwarzman Professor of Law, this panel will discuss the current state of the lawsuits challenging the election results as well as questions around the transfer of power from one administration to the next. We will be joined by experts in democratic theory and constitutional law, including Jack Goldsmith, Henry L. Shattuck Professor of Law at Harvard University, Bertrall Ross, Chancellor's Professor of Law at UC Berkeley School of Law, Kate Shaw, Professor of Law at Cardozo School of Law, and Mila Versteeg, Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law. Please register in advance here: https://duke.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_F1VQRKY1QHu2RcijjwbhVw . Co-sponsored by the Dean's Office and the Program in Public Law. Please contact Rachel Greeson (Rachel.greeson@law.duke.edu ) for more information.

  • None

    Moderated by Guy Charles, Edward and Ellen Schwarzman Professor of Law, this panel will discuss the current state of the lawsuits challenging the election results as well as questions around the transfer of power from one administration to the next. We will be joined by experts in democratic theory and constitutional law, including Jack Goldsmith, Henry L. Shattuck Professor of Law at Harvard University, Bertrall Ross, Chancellor's Professor of Law at UC Berkeley School of Law, Kate Shaw, Professor of Law at Cardozo School of Law, and Mila Versteeg, Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law. Please register in advance here: https://duke.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_F1VQRKY1QHu2RcijjwbhVw . Co-sponsored by the Dean's Office and the Program in Public Law. Please contact Rachel Greeson (Rachel.greeson@law.duke.edu ) for more information.

  • Virtual

    Please join us for a special 'live' recording of the podcast Strict Scrutiny virtually at Duke Law. Podcast hosts Leah Litman, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School, and Kate Shaw, Professor of Law at Cardoza School of Law will be joined by Duke Law Professor Marin Levy to recap the cases that were argued during the November argument session. Registration for the webinar can be found here https://duke.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_t-7m7JEnS8ml5WMJrNoOjA More information on the Strict Scrutiny Podcast can be found at www.strictscrutinypodcast.com. This event is sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information please contact Isabel Fox at isabel.fox@law.duke.edu

  • Virtual

    Join us for a panel appraising the electoral college with Mrs. Jennifer C. Braceras, Director of the Independent Women's Law Center, and Duke Law Professors Stephen Sachs and Neil Siegel. This event will discuss arguments for and against the electoral college, with a focus on why the electoral college is an integral part of our political system. Sponsored by the Duke Law Federalist Society. Co-sponsored by the Duke Program in Public Law, the American Constitution Society, the Duke Program in American Values and Institutions, and the Duke Political Science Department. For more information, please contact Meredith Criner at meredith.criner@duke.edu. Log in using Webinar ID: 921 8341 9201, or this link: https://zoom.us/j/92183419201

  • Virtual

    Please join us for Duke Law School's annual Supreme Court Wrap-Up to discuss the major cases from the October 2019 Term, including June Medical Services v. Russo, Bostock v. Clayton County, and Kansas v. Glover. Our panelists will include Duke Law Professors Lisa Griffin, Maggie Lemos, Darrell Miller, and Neil Siegel. Professor Marin Levy will moderate. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law.For more information, contact Marlen Iraheta at marlen.iraheta@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Please join us as we discuss redistricting in North Carolina, and hear from the lawyers involved in Common Cause v. Lewis. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Marlen Iraheta at marlen.iraheta@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Hear from the agency adjudicators themselves on the current state and future of administrative adjudication during the Duke Law Journal's 50th Annual Administrative Law Symposium: Charting the New Landscape of Administrative Adjudication. We welcome Nancy Griswold, Chief Administrative Law Judge of the Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals, Scott Boalick, Chief Administrative Patent Judge of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, and James McHenry, Director of the Executive Office for Immigration Review. Sponsored by the Duke Law Journal and the Program in Public Law. Bag lunches provided, no registration required. For more information, please contact Chelsea Kapes at cnk16@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Members of the Duke community are invited to join us for a U.S. Supreme Court Moot in June Medical v. Gee with Julie Rikelman of the Center for Reproductive Rights. This case, which will be argued on March 4, presents the question whether Louisiana's admitting privileges law imposes an undue burden on a woman's right to abortion before fetal viability, and whether a medical provider and doctor have third-party standing to bring such a claim. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Marlen Iraheta at marlen.iraheta@law.duke.edu

  • Law School 3041

    Join us as we talk to two experts on Nationwide Injunctions - Prof. Sam Bray and Prof. Mila Sohoni - and discuss the history of those injunctions and how that history should shape our acceptance of the remedy today. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Marlen Iraheta at marlen.iraheta@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Please join nationally recognized expert on Congress, Prof. Josh Chafetz, for a discussion of the state of play of impeachment proceedings. Moderated by Prof. Marin Levy. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. Lunch will be provided. For more information, please contact Marlen Iraheta at marlen.iraheta@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Professor Keith Whittington, Professor of Politics at Princeton University, and Duke Law Professor Walter Dellinger will be discussing the Impeachment Clause, specifically focusing on what conduct constitutes an impeachable offense. After Professors Whittington and Dellinger provide brief remarks, Duke Law Professor Guy Charles will moderate a discussion with both panelists before inviting questions from the audience at the very end. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Federalist Society, the American Constitution Society, and the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Brent McKnight at brent.mcknight@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    A panel discussion about the Supreme Court's recent decisions on gerrymandering, and how experts in math are helping courts to identify and quantify the problem. With Moon Duchin, Jonathan Mattingly, Greg Herschlag, and Guy Charles. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. Lunch will be provided. For more information, please contact Marlen Iraheta at marlen.iraheta@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3043

    Join us for a conversation with Professor Scott Gaylord of Elon Law and Professor William Marshall of UNC Law. The panelists will discuss both of the Constitution's religion clauses, explaining how the Supreme Court significantly altered its Establishment Clause analysis last term and how it may be soon turning its attention to the Free Exercise Clause. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law, the Federalist Society, and the American Constitution Society. For more information, please contact Aaron Sanders at aaron.sanders@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Please join us for a Supreme Court Moot in Allen v. Cooper with Ryan Park, Deputy Solicitor General of North Carolina. The case raises the question of whether Congress validly abrogated state sovereign immunity via the Copyright Remedy Clarification Act in providing remedies for authors of original expression whose federal copyrights are infringed by states. Professors Curt Bradley, Maggie Lemos, and Steve Sachs will make up the panel. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Marlen Iraheta at marlen.iraheta@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 4047

    Why has judicial review in the United States evolved into such a vastly different concept than judicial review in the UK and most other common law jurisdictions? New Zealand Court of Appeal Justice David Collins offers a comparative analysis. Justice Collins is a 2018 graduate of Duke Law's Master of Judicial Studies program and is visiting Duke as the Bolch Judicial Institute's Distinguished Judge in Residence. Lunch from Guasaca will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Co-sponsored by the Bolch Judicial Institute and the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Kristin Triebel at kristin.triebel@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 4047

    New Zealand Court of Appeal Justice David Collins discusses proposals to expand the United States Supreme Court and the principal arguments against court packing. Justice Collins is a 2018 graduate of Duke Law's Master of Judicial Studies program and is visiting Duke as the Bolch Judicial Institute's Distinguished Judge in Residence. Lunch from Enzo's will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Co-sponsored by the Bolch Judicial Institute and the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Kristin Triebel at kristin.triebel@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Join Michael Dreeben JD'81, former U.S. Deputy Solicitor General, and Dean Kerry Abrams as they discuss their lives in the law. From 1988 through 2019, Michael served in the Office of Solicitor General in the U.S. Department of Justice, first as an Assistant to the Solicitor General and then as a Deputy Solicitor General. As Deputy Solicitor General from 1994 to 2019, he supervised the criminal docket for the United States in the U.S. Supreme Court and argued 105 cases before the Court. In June 2017, Michael was detailed to Office of Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III, where he served counselor to the Special Counsel in the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and obstruction of justice. In that capacity, he successfully represented the Special Counsel's Office in federal court against legal challenges to its authority. He is now a Distinguished Lecturer from Government at the Georgetown University Law Center. Bag lunches will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Sponsored by the Office of the Dean and Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Rachel Ferebee at rachel.ferebee@law.duke.edu

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law, the Federalist Society, and the American Constitution Society are sponsoring a Supreme Court Wrap-up and Preview to discuss the major cases from October Term 2018 and the new cases for the upcoming Term. Panelists include Professor Dan Epps from Washington University in St. Louis (of the First Mondays Podcast), and Duke Law Professors Guy Charles, Lisa Griffin, and Stephen Sachs. Professor Marin Levy will moderate. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the PProgram in Public Law, the Federalist Society, and the American Constitution Society. For more information, contact Marlen Iraheta at marlen.iraheta@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    David F. Levi, director of the Bolch Judicial Institute, will moderate a discussion with state court leaders about efforts to reduce the disproportionate impact on poor and minority communities of court fees, fines, and bail practices. Participants include Hon. Scott Bales (former Chief Justice, Arizona); Hon. Doug Beach (Senior Judge, Circuit Court, Missouri); Hon. Mark Martin (former Chief Justice, North Carolina); Hon. Judy Nakamura (Chief Justice, New Mexico); Hon. Maureen O'Connor (Chief Justice, Ohio); Hon. Stuart Rabner (Chief Justice, New Jersey); Mary McQueen (President, National Center for State Courts); and Martin Hoshino (Administrative Director, Judicial Council of California). Seating is limited. Lunches will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the Bolch Judicial Institute at Duke Law. For more information, please contact Lora Beth Farmer at lora.farmer@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3043

    Please join us for a panel discussion with Professors Guy Charles, Tim Lovelace, Thavolia Glymph, Neil Siegel, Darrell Miller, and Ernest Young, reflecting on Duke Law School's recent conference, which critically reexamined the Reconstruction period, the Reconstruction Amendments, and the post-Reconstruction period. Moderated by Professor Marin Levy, and sponsored by the Program in Public Law. Lunch will be provided. For more information, please contact Bonnie Millis at bonnie.millis@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3171

    The law school's Center for Firearms Law is hosting University of Texas law professor Sanford Levinson, a major constitutional law scholar who also wrote the book "Written in Stone" about monuments. It was published by Duke University Press 20 years ago, and just re-issued this year. We invite interested students and faculty to join us for a small discussion about issues raised in Scott Huler's recent (02/08/19) article in Duke Magazine. Sponsored by the Duke Center for Firearms Law and the Program in Public Law. Moderated by Joseph Blocher. For more information, please contact Allison Rackley at allison.rackley@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 4047

    Walter Olson, senior fellow at the Cato Institute, and Robert Joyce, Professor of Public Law and Government at UNC School of Government will discuss gerrymandering and avenues for redistricting reform. Sponsored by the Federalist Society. For more information, please contact Brent McKnight at brent.mcknight@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Duke Law faculty will moot Texas Solicitor General Kyle Hawkins in preparation for his oral argument as amicus curiae in Gamble v. United States. Gamble raises the question whether the Court should abolish the 'separate sovereigns' doctrine that permits both state and federal authorities to try a criminal defendant for similar crimes without violating the Double Jeopardy Clause of the Constitution. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Allison Rackley at allison.rackley@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 4047

    Dan Epps and Ian Samuel, the hosts of Supreme Court podcast First Mondays, will be at Duke Law to record a live show. Join us to hear them discuss upcoming cases, the major trends of October Term 2018, speculate about future developments on the Court, and more. Sponsored by Duke Program in Public Law, Duke Law Journal, American Constitution Society, and the Federalist Society. For more information, please contact South Moore at south.moore@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Please join Jamie Gorelick for "The Relationship between the Department of Justice and the White House." Ms. Gorelick is one of the longest serving Deputy Attorneys General of the United States, in which capacity she coordinated interactions between the Department of Justice and the White House with respect to ongoing criminal investigations as well as numerous other matters. Her career has spanned the legal, corporate and public policy landscape. A litigator by training, she is a partner at WilmerHale in Washington, where she counsels organizations and individuals on regulatory and enforcement matters as well as issues at the intersection of law and policy, including congressional inquiries. She regularly serves on commissions and boards of inquiry. She has been a member of the National Security Advisory Panel at the Central Intelligence Agency, and is a member of the Defense Policy Board. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. Lunch will be served. For more information, please contact Carol Abken at carol.abken@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Join Nathaniel Garrett, partner at Jones Day, for a moot in District of Columbia v. Wesby. This case is set to be argued before the United States Supreme Court on October 4, 2017. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Jean Jentilet at jean.jentilet@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Members of the Duke Law Community are invited to join some members of the faculty for their perspectives on the historical and contemporary significance and implications of monuments as well as other symbols in the wake of the recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Jean Jentilet at jean.jentilet@law.duke.edu

  • Law School 3037

    The 2016 elections will impact the federal judiciary for years to come. With nearly 100 federal court vacancies - including one on the Supreme Court - the next President and the next Senate have the potential to reshape the federal judiciary. Please join the American Constitution Society for a panel discussion with Professors Neil Siegel of Duke Law, Craig Green of Temple Law, Michael Gerhardt of UNC Law, and Georg Vanberg of the Duke Department of Political Science for a discussion on the future of the courts under President Trump. Professor Maggie Lemos will moderate. Lunch will be served. Co-sponsored by the American Constitution Society and the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Zachary Newkirk at zachary.newkirk@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Duke Law Alum Dan Jacobs discusses his new book, the first comprehensive account of the legal, economic, and environmental consequences of the disaster that resulted from the April 2010 blowout at a BP well in the Gulf of Mexico. The accident, which destroyed the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, killed 11 people. The ensuing oil discharge-the largest ever in U.S. waters-polluted much of the Gulf for months, wreaking havoc on its inhabitants and the environment. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Jean Jentilet at jean.jentilet@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Join Jeffrey L. Fisher, Co-Director of the Stanford Law School Supreme Court Litigation Clinic, for a moot court in Pena-Rodriguez v. Colorado. This case is set to be argued in front of the US Supreme Court on October 11th, 2016. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Jean Jentilet at jean.jentilet@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Few subjects inspire more debate than guns. Do gun laws work? Are restrictions on gun ownership constitutional? Should gun companies be held responsible when criminals misuse their products? The Program in Public Law welcomes Alla Lefkowitz '10, Staff Attorney at Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, to discuss how these issues are addressed in the courts. The talk will address recent developments in Second Amendment law, and provide an introduction to civil lawsuits brought by victims of gun violence against gun manufacturers and sellers. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Jean Jentilet at jean.jentilet@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law is pleased to hold a lunchtime event to honor the memory of Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February of this year. In his thirty years of service on the Court, Justice Scalia significantly influenced the ways that judges, lawyers, and the public think, talk, and write about the law, the Constitution, and the Court. Please join former Scalia clerk and litigation partner William Jay of Goodwin Procter, Professors Neil Siegel and Ernest Young, and Professor Margaret Lemos, who will moderate, as the Duke Law School community discusses the life and legacy of this influential jurist. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Jean Jentilet at jean.jentilet@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Center on Law, Race and Politics and the Program in Public Law present this two-day conference, which will feature over 100 scholars, teachers, practitioners, and activists from across the country. Conference presenters will share their unique perspectives on inequality in the United States. The conference offers an opportunity for persons concerned about the persistent effects of systematic racism to reflect on the past and present as they contemplate future action. Registration required, space is limited. For a complete schedule and list of presenters, please visit the conference website. Sponsored by CLRP and PIPL. For more information, please contact Stephanie Lowd at Stephanie.Lowd@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Center on Law, Race and Politics and the Program in Public Law present this two-day conference, which will feature over 100 scholars, teachers, practitioners, and activists from across the country. Conference presenters will share their unique perspectives on inequality in the United States. The conference offers an opportunity for persons concerned about the persistent effects of systematic racism to reflect on the past and present as they contemplate future action. Registration required, space is limited. For a complete schedule and list of presenters, please visit the conference website. Sponsored by the CLRP and PIPL. For more information, please contact Stephanie Lowd at Stephanie.Lowd@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Please join the Center on Law, Race and Politics, the American Constitution Society, and the Program in Public Law as we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Thirteenth Amendment with a panel discussion on the history and contemporary relevance of the Thirteenth Amendment. Panelists will include Professor Darrell Miller (Duke Law), Professor Laura Edwards (Duke History), and Professor George Rutherglen (Virginia Law). Lunch will be provided - first come, first served. Co-sponsored by the Center on Law, Race and Politics, the Program in Public Law and the American Constitution Society. For more information, please contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    In his latest book, After Nature: A Politics for the Anthropocene, Professor Jedediah Purdy defines and details the Anthropocene epoch - the age of humans - and calls for a new way of thinking about political, legal, and cultural solutions to environmental problems. Tracing critical changes in our relationship with the natural world, the book has been praised by critics for its depth and urgency. In an era where humans and the environment are inextricably tied, how do we approach environmental politics, economics and ethics? Professor Lisa Kern Griffin will begin the conversation and discussion. All are welcome to join. Sponsored by the Office of the Dean, The Goodson Law Library, and the Program in Public Law. Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information please contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Duke Law students, faculty, and staff are invited to join Howard Srebnick, Partner at Black, Srebnick, Kornspan & Stumpf, P.A., for a moot court in Luis v US. This case is set to be argued in front of the US Supreme Court on November 10th, 2015. The question presented is: Whether the pretrial restraint of a criminal defendant's legitimate, untainted assets (those not traceable to a criminal offense) needed to retain counsel of choice violates the Fifth and Sixth Amendments. This event is open to the Duke Law community only. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. Lunch will be provided - first come, first served. For more information, contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Brian T. Kelly, Partner, Nixon Peabody, former AUSA, and a lead prosecutor on the investigation, capture, and trial of Boston gangster James "Whitey" Bulger. Lunch is provided - first come, first served. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information please contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law presents its Annual Supreme Court Preview. Join Duke Law professors Lisa Griffin, Tom Metzloff, Darrell Miller, and Neil Siegel for a preview of the Supreme Court's October 2015 Term. Lunch will be provided - first come, first served. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information please contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Duke Law Center on Law, Race and Politics, the Program in Public Law, the Duke Council on Race & Ethnicity, the Black Law Students Association and the Black Student Alliance will host Black Lives, Atticus Finch, and the Ethics of Legal Fictions, a discussion with Professors Katharine Bartlett the A. Kenneth Pye Professor of Law and Karla Holloway the James B. Duke Professor of English & African American Studies, based on the controversy surrounding Go Set A Watchman/To Kill a Mockingbird. Moderated by Marcus Benning (BLSA) and Henry Washington (BSA), this will explore such questions as: Who is Atticus Finch? Does it matter? What does "he" owe us? What do we owe "him"? What, if anything, does the appearance of this "revision" of the Mockingbird story reveal/teach/reflect about race in our culture/legal system? What, if anything, does it say about the law, ethics, and politics of Black Lives Matter? Sponsored by the Duke Council on Race & Ethnicity, the Black Law Students Association and the Black Student Alliance. For more information, please contact Julie Moushon at julie.moushon@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Please join the American Constitution Society, the Program in Public Law, the Women Law Students Association, Law Students for Reproductive Justice, and the Law and History Society for a panel discussion on the 50th anniversary of the landmark decision in Griswold v. Connecticut. This panel will feature Professor Neil Siegel (Duke), Professor Katharine Bartlett (Duke), Professor Maxine Eichner (University of North Carolina), and Kristine Kippins (Center for Reproductive Rights) discussing historical and current issues in reproductive justice. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by ACS. For more information, please contact Ana Apostoleris at ama64@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    The Program in Public Law is pleased to present Walter E. Dellinger as he delivers his lecture, "America's Greatest Lawyer: Abraham Lincoln in Private Law and Public Life." Dellinger is the Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law at Duke Law School. He has also served as acting Solicitor General, Assistant Attorney General, and head of the Office of Legal Counsel. Dinner will be provided - first come, first served. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information please contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Lives in the Law with David Rubenstein T'70, co-founder and co-CEO of The Carlyle Group. This event is open to Duke Law students, faculty, and staff only. Lunch will be served. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Dawn Blalock at blalock@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Join the Program in Public Law and the American Constitution Society as we welcome Elizabeth Gill (Senior Staff Attorney with the ACLU of Northern California) in a moderated panel discussion with Neil Siegel (Co Director of the Program in Public Law) regarding the past and present marriage equality litigation. The panelists will discuss the strategy choices that accompany nationwide civil rights litigation, the practical and theoretical issues surrounding equal protection and due process jurisprudence, and the impact these cases will have on civil rights, constitutional adjudication and federalism going forward. Lunch is provided - first come first served. For more information please contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Duke Law students, faculty and staff are invited to join Andrew Oldham, Deputy Solicitor General of Texas, for a moot court in Jennings v. Stephens. This case is set to be argued in front of the US Supreme Court on October 15th, 2014. The question presented is: Whether a federal habeas petitioner who prevailed in the district court on an ineffective assistance of counsel claim must file a separate notice of appeal and motion for a certificate of appealability to raise an allegation of deficient performance that the district court rejected even though the court of appeals acquired jurisdiction over the entire claim as a result of the respondent's appeal. This event is open to the Duke Law community only. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu. Lunch will be served.

  • Law School 3041

    Join Duke Law alum and Georgia State University College of Law Professor Timothy K. Kuhner, who will give a talk and answer questions on his newly released book, "Capitalism v. Democracy: Money in Politics and the Free Market Constitution." In the book, Kuhner analyzes a sample of campaign finance cases between Buckley and McCutcheon, and argues that the Supreme Court has employed a radical form of economic ideology to defeat campaign finance reform, opening the door to the corruption of democracy and capitalism in the process. Copies of the books will be available for sale after the event. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. Lunch will be served. For more information, please contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Duke Law students, faculty and staff are invited to join Jeffrey L. Fisher, Professor of Law and Co-Director, Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford Law School for a moot court in Heien v. North Carolina. A leading authority on Supreme Court practice and nationally recognized expert on criminal procedure, Jeffrey L. Fisher's work at Stanford Law revolves around handling cases in the U.S. Supreme Court. He has argued 23 cases in the Court, on issues ranging from criminal justice to maritime law to telecommunications law. The case poses the issue whether a police officer's mistake of law (rather than of fact) can supply the individualized suspicion necessary to justify a traffic stop. This event is open to the Duke community only. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu. Lunch will be served.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law welcomes Danielle Citron, Duke Alum and Lois K. Macht Research Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law to discuss her new book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace, a timely look at the real effects of cyber-bullying and online abuse and a discussion of practical, legal ways to prevent this harassment. Danielle will be signing copies of her book after the talk. Co-sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the Kenan Institute for Ethics. Lunch will be provided. Please contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu for more information.

  • Law School 3041

    Do Members of Congress take the U.S. Constitution seriously? Do they attempt to shape their actions to what the Constitution says? Do they instead shape what the Constitution says so that it supports their actions (and condemns the actions of their opponents)? Or do they largely disregard the Constitution? Duke professors Chris Schroeder and Neil Siegel and UNC professor Michael Gerhardt will discuss these questions from both an historical and a contemporary perspective. They will also address the potential role of judicial review in bringing about the current state of affairs. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. Lunch will be provided. For more information please contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law presents its annual Supreme Court Review. Duke Law professors Kate Bartlett, Lisa Griffin, Neil Siegel, and Ernie Young review the most significant decisions of the past term of the U.S. Supreme Court. Lunch will be provided - first come, first served. For more information contact Sarah Holsapple at sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Bryan Center Von Canon Rooms

    What does it mean for all of us when the government we count on to keep us safe, the companies we do business with, and even the cars we drive are tracking our daily activities? Hear from panelists including Christopher H. Schroeder, Charles S. Murphy Professor of Law and Public Policy Studies and Co-Director of the Program in Public Law, Duke University; and Sibylle Gierschmann L'99, Partner and Head of the Technology, Communication, and Media Group, Taylor Wessing. Moderated byWells C. Bennett L'06, Fellow in National Security Law, The Brookings Institute. For more information, please contact Andrew Park at andrew.park@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3043

    Jess Bravin, Wall Street Journal's Supreme Court correspondent, tells the still unfolding story of military commission justice, in large part through the story of Marine Corp JAG Lt. Colonel Stu Couch, whose efforts to try suspected terrorists brought him face to face with the injustice of enhanced interrogation techniques, the efforts to nonetheless use the evidence obtained, and other difficulties in standing up an untried military commission system at Guantanamo Bay. Bravin and Couch will discuss the book and answer questions. Co-sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the Guantanamo Clinic. Lunch provided - first come, first served. For more information please contact sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Supreme Court of the United States will soon hear arguments on whether for-profit corporations and their owners may claim religious freedom exceptions from provisions of the Affordable Care Act. The cases raise important questions about constitutional law, healthcare policy, the corporate form, statutory construction, and the ability of Congress to protect constitutional norms. Professors Darrell Miller, Barak Richman, Neil Siegel, Ernie Young, and Kate Bartlett will participate in a lunchtime panel discussion on what we may expect from the Court, and what it may mean for constitutional law and public policy. Lunch provided courtesy of the Program in Public Law - first come first served. For more information please contact sarah.holsapple@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Dean David F. Levi will interview Larry Thompson, executive vice president, Government Affairs, general counsel, and corporate secretary of PepsiCo. Thompson's career has spanned the highest levels of public service and private sector work. As deputy attorney general in the U.S. Department of Justice he lead the Security Coordination, and the Corporate Fraud Task Force; he focused on antitrust and litigation as a partner at King & Spalding; and he served as the U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Georgia. Thompson has also been a senior fellow with the Brookings Institution and was the John A. Sibley Professor in Corporate and Business Law at the University of Georgia School of Law. This event is open to Duke Law students, faculty, and staff only. Lunch will be served. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact the Events Office at events@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 4047

    Please join WLSA, HLS, and ILS for a lunch conversation with Rocio Perez '11, an associate and professor of Global Legal Skills at the Costa Rica office of Arias & Muñoz, a major international law firm located in Central America. Ms. Perez has worked in the Public Law, Corporate and Litigation departments and has also developed the in-house professional development program at the firm. She will be speaking about starting a legal career abroad, the skills needed to pursue an international legal career, and working as a woman in a foreign legal setting. For more information, please contact Oleg Kobelev at kobelev@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Please join Jocelyn Strauber for a conversation about her work as an Assistant United States Attorney in the Southern District of New York. Jocelyn, L'98, worked in the Litigation Department of Davis Polk & Wardwell for several years before joining the U.S. Attorney's Office, where she prosecuted international narcotics trafficking cases, and most recently served as co-chief of the Office's Terrorism & International Narcotics Unit. Come hear why present and former prosecutors refer to this as the best job they've ever had. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, email Stephanie.Lowd@law.duke.edu.

  • See description

    Alumni in the local Philadelphia community are invited to attend a fireside chat with Former U.S. Senator Ted Kaufman. The event will be led by Neil Siegel '94, A.M.'95, the David W. Ichel Professor of law and professor of political science, co-director of the Program in Public Law, and director of Duke's D.C. Summer Institute on Law and Policy. It will be held at 6:00pm at Montgomery McCracken. Registration details coming soon. Questions? Contact Squire Servance B'07, L'08 at squire.servance@gmail.com.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law presents its annual Supreme Court Preview. Panelists discuss some of the most important Supreme Court cases of the upcoming term. For more information, please contact Stephanie Lowd at stephanie.lowd@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law presents its annual Supreme Court Criminal Review on September 24th, 2013. Duke Law Professors Neil Siegel, Samuel Buell, Lisa Griffin, and James Coleman will discuss the most significant criminal decisions of the past term of the U.S. Supreme Court. For further information, contact Stephanie.Lowd@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law presents its annual Supreme Court Review (Civil). Duke Law Professors Neil Siegel, Darrell Miller, and Ernie Young discuss the most significant decisions of the past term of the U.S. Supreme Court, focusing on civil cases. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3043

    The Asian Law Students Association is proud to welcome John R. Dunne, former Assistant Attorney General of the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division and current Senior Counsel at Whiteman Osterman & Hanna LLP. At the Civil Rights Division, Mr. Dunne oversaw the U.S. government's formal apology and redress to Japanese Americans forced to relocate into internment camps during World War II. Mr. Dunne will reflect on the implementation of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, as well as his distinguished career in public service. Lunch will be provided. For more information, please contact Zi-Xiang Shen at zs28@duke.edu. This event is generously sponsored by the Program in Public Law.

  • Law School 3041

    The primary goal of this instructional program is to promote civic competence and responsibility in elementary, middle and high school students. Students study materials relating to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the principles and development of constitutional democracy in the United States. High school classes may choose to culminate their study through participation in competitions styled as simulated congressional hearings. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the North Carolina Bar Association. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security with support from the Program in Public Law. For more information, please click on the link to visit the conference website.

  • Law School 3041

    Sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security with support from the Program in Public Law. For more information, please click on the link to visit the conference website.

  • Law School 3041

    Stephen C. Leckar L'73 successfully argued the case of U.S. vs. Antoine Jones, a landmark decision on the limits of warrantless GPS surveillance, before the Supreme Court in 2011. Join us as he discusses what it was like to take on this highly visible case, thus bringing the Court into 21st-century technology, as well as how one builds a coalition and prepares (and prepares ad infinitum) for such an argument. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell (norvell@law.duke.edu).

  • Law School 3037

    With immigration reform likely around the corner, what does the future hold for the DREAM Act? And what impact has President Obama's Executive Order (outlining a policy of not deporting young people without legal immigration status but with clean records) had? Join the Program in Public Law and the Duke Law ACLU for a discussion with UCLA Law Professor Hiroshi Motomura about California's version of the DREAM Act, prosecutorial discretion, immigration violations, politics, and implementation. This event comes one day before the Perspectives on Migration, Governance, and Citizenship Symposium, which students are also encouraged to attend. Lunch will be provided, with funding from the DBA. For more info, contact Jeff Steiner at jds97@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Jeffrey Fisher, Counsel of Record for the Petitioner, moots this upcoming case, which is scheduled to be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court on October 1, 2012. At issue is whether a floating structure that is indefinitely moored, receives power and other utilities from shore, and is not intended to be used in maritime transportation or commerce constitutes a "vessel" under 1 U.S.C. § 3, thus triggering federal maritime jurisdiction. Professor Fisher codirects Stanford Law School's Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. Dean David F. Levi leads the panel of judges, which includes Duke Law Professors Donald Ayer, Margaret Lemos, Stephen Sachs, and Ernest Young. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell, norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    The Program in Public Law presents Professor RonNell Andersen Jones (J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young University). Forty years ago, in Branzburg v. Hayes, the Supreme Court made its first and only inquiry into the constitutional protection of the relationship between a reporter and a confidential source, resulting in a reporter-focused "privilege" now widely regarded to be doctrinally questionable and deeply inconsistent in application. Jones argues that the Court should abandon its reporter-based approach to confidential-source cases and suggests that analyzing these cases based on the anonymous speech rights of sources rather than on the information-flow or news gathering rights of the reporters will more fully acknowledge the scope of First Amendment interests at stake and eliminate the need to define who is a "reporter" for purposes of the privilege--a task that has become increasingly complicated as technological changes alter the primary mechanisms for gathering and disseminating news. Watch live on ustream at: http://www.ustream.tv/dukelaw

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law presents its annual Supreme Court Review (Civil). Duke Law professors Neil Siegel, Kate Bartlett, Joseph Blocher, Maggie Lemos, and Ernie Young discuss the most significant decisions of the past term of the U.S. Supreme Court, focusing on civil cases. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Examining the state - and future - of national security law in an era with fewer active battlefields, yet one with persisting threats of technology-empowered and homegrown terrorists, concerns about balancing security and privacy, and rising peer-competitors. Sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security with support from the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Kathy Julian at julian@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Examining the state - and future - of national security law in an era with fewer active battlefields, yet one with persisting threats of technology-empowered and homegrown terrorists, concerns about balancing security and privacy, and rising peer-competitors. Sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security with support from the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Kathy Julian at julian@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3043

    Join the Federalist Society, the Duke Journal of Constitutional Law and Public Policy, and former FBI Special Agent Alicia Hilton, and Professor Lisa Griffin for a discussion on the issues raised by the case Florida v. Jardines. The case will be heard by the Supreme Court in the upcoming October term. The main issue is whether a drug dog sniffing at the threshold of one's front door constitutes a Fourth Amendment search: http://www.scotusblog.com/case-files/cases/florida-v-jardines/?wpmp_swi…. Professor Neil Siegel will moderate what promises to be an interesting discussion. Co-sponsored by Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Phil Aubart at pla4@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Trayvon Martin, an unarmed 17 year old who wore a hoodie and carried skittles and iced tea, was fatally shot while walking towards his family home in Sanford, Florida. His shooter, George Zimmerman the neighborhood watchman, claimed self-defense and was never arrested. The death of Trayvon Martin has sparked a national debate. Join the Black Law Students Association (BLSA) and Professors Coleman, Hu, Buell and Beale in a panel discussion of the legal questions surrounding his death. Lunch will be provided. co-sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Linda Atiase at laa22@duke.edu, Ndidi Menkiti at nnm3@duke.edu or Bud Baker at whb6@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Do you ever wonder who builds your iPhone? The New York Times and other news media have focused their attention recently on manufacturing trends in China and the globalization of U.S. companies such as Apple. Recent migration shifts to manufacturing centers in China have helped fuel the profit margins of companies such as Apple through an unprecedented supply of labor. Duke Law's Program in Public Law and Center for International and Comparative Law, along with the Kenan Institute for Ethics and the Triangle China Forum on Urbanization and Migration, host an exciting panel discussion on the complex geopolitical, labor, and human rights issues surrounding China's economic revolution. This event will be webcast. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3000

    As part of its Faculty Tea Series, WLSA is honored to host Professor Neil Siegel for lunch. Professor Siegel teaches constitutional law classes and is the co-director of the Program in Public Law at Duke.
    For more information, please contact Kate Dickinson at kjd16@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law and the Center for Comparative and International Law present a panel discussion on China environmental policy. Professor Paul Haagen moderates. Berkeley Professor Alex Wang joins Duke Law Professors Donald Clarke, Jonathan Ocko, and Jonathan Wiener for this engaging talk. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3043

    The Program in Public Law, Kenan Institute for Ethics, American Constitution Society (Washington, DC), and Duke Law ACLU present an exciting panel discussion on the Supreme Court's recent decision to hear arguments in Arizona v. United States. SB 1070 has been referred to in the media as the "racial profiling" law because it requires law enforcement officers in Arizona to inspect the documents of those suspected of unlawful presence in the state. Noah Pickus, Director of the Kenan Institute for Ethics and nationally renowned scholar in immigration policy, will be moderating a panel discussion on the legal issues in this highly controversial case. Gabriel "Jack" Chin, Professor of Law at UC Davis and an expert on SB 1070, and Lucas Guttentag, Founding Director of the ACLU Immigrants' Rights Project and Professor of Law at Yale Law and Stanford Law, will be joined by Duke Law Professor Ernest Young and Visiting Assistant Professor Margaret Hu. This event will be webcast. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The primary goal of this instructional program is to promote civic competence and responsibility in elementary, middle and high school students. Students study materials relating to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the principles and development of constitutional democracy in the United States. High school classes may choose to culminate their study through participation in competitions styled as simulated congressional hearings. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the North Carolina Bar Association. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law presents a panel discussion on the Constitutional challenges to the health care law, the issues/arguments involved in these challenges, and thoughts about what the Court should do, will do, and how much it matters (i.e., which health care system problems will persist, whatever the Court decides). This event will be webcast. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3043

    The Federalist Society welcomes you to join us for a debate between Mr. J. Christian Adams from the Election Law Center and Professor Atiba Ellis, L '00 from the West Virginia University College of Law for a debate on Voter Identification Laws. As more states pass such laws understanding this topic is becoming increasingly important. Mr. Adams is an election lawyer who served in the Voting Rights Section at the U.S. Department of Justice and a columnist for PJmedia.com. Professor Ellis focuses his research and writing on the law of democracy with a specific interest in voting rights law, and the intersection of democratic theory with race, class, and other critical legal perspectives. Co-sponsored by the Program in Public Law. This event will be webcast. For more information please contact Phil Aubart at pla4@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Kent Greenfield, Professor of Law at Boston College Law School, will present his upcoming Duke Journal of Constitutional Law and Public Policy article on the different approaches to consent in constitutional law and discuss his new book, The Myth of Choice. A book sale and author signing will follow the event. Co-sponsored by DJCLPP, the Public Law Program and the Federalist Society. Questions, contact Shine Chen at shine.chen@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law presents its annual Supreme Court Preview. Duke Law professors Neil Siegel, Kate Bartlett, Curt Bradley, Stephen Sachs, and student Emily May ('13) discuss some of the most important Supreme Court cases of the upcoming term. This event will be webcast. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Fuqua School of Business

    Panels of experts will examine issues relating to national security, including indefinite detention of terrorists, information security (e.g. WikiLeaks), armed drones, airport security, and the protection of privacy in the cyber era all illustrate the tensions between the needs of security in an era of asymmetrical threats and the preservation of civil liberties and other interests in a democratic society.
    Sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics, and National Security, the Center for International and Comparative Law, and the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Scott Silliman at silliman@law.duke.edu.

  • Fuqua School of Business

    Panels of experts will examine issues relating to national security, including indefinite detention of terrorists, information security (e.g. WikiLeaks), armed drones, airport security, and the protection of privacy in the cyber era which all illustrate the tensions between the needs of security in an era of asymmetrical threats and the preservation of civil liberties and other interests in a democratic society.
    Sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics, and National Security, the Center for International and Comparative Law, and the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Scott Silliman at silliman@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    The Program in Public Law and Duke Law ACS present a discussion with Madeline Morris, Charlie Swift, and Laura Poitras. Professor Morris is a leading expert on counterterrorism detention and military commissions. Poitras is an Academy-Award nominated film director who has won numerous awards for her documentaries examining the consequences of post-9/11 foreign policy in the Middle East. Swift successfully represented Salim Hamdan, the plaintiff Guantanamo detainee in the landmark case, Hamdan v. Rumsfeld. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 4042

    The Program in Public Law and Duke Law ACS are honored to host Academy Award-nominated documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras for a a film screening of her most recent documentary, "The Oath," which has won awards at both the Sundance Film Festival and the Berlin International Film Festival. "The Oath" tells the story of Salim Hamdan, Osama bin Laden's former driver and the Guantanamo detainee who lent his name to the landmark Supreme Court case, Hamdan v. Rumsfeld. Please join us for introductory remarks with Poitras and attorney Charlie Swift from 3:00 to 3:30 PM, followed by the film screening from 3:30 to 5:00 PM, and a reception and signing event from 5:00 to 5:30 PM. This event will be webcast. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Caroline Fredrickson, the Executive Director of the American Constitution Society, will provide an overview of the judicial nominations crisis. She will highlight the numbers, polling results, pending nominees, and how this crisis affects us all. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the Duke Law chapter of ACS. This event will be webcast. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Jack Ford, legal analyst for CBS News and Peabody Award-winning journalist, will speak about some of the high profile trials he has covered over the last 25 years, as well as older historic trials. He will share his experiences and his thoughts on how trials that capture the media's attention can impact the legal profession as a whole. The event is open to all students, faculty, and staff. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Steve Rawson @ rawson@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Duke Journal of Constitutional Law and Public Policy's annual symposium will focus on judicial takings and the Fifth Amendment. This symposium will explore issues addressed in the Supreme Court's recent landmark case, Stop the Beach Renourishment v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Participants will include Bill Marshall (UNC Law School), Ernest Young (Duke Law), Nestor Davidson (Univ. of Colorado Law School), Richard Epstein (NYU Law), Stacey Dogan (BU School of Law), and Ilya Somin (George Mason School of Law) among others. The symposium was made possible with the generous support of the Program in Public Law. This event will be webcast. For more information, please contact Elizabeth Kim at elizabeth.kim@duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Sri Srinivasan, is a partner in the Washington, DC, office of O'Melveny and Myers LLP, and his focus is on appellate and complex litigation. He has argued 17 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, including five cases in the past two Terms. Recent notable cases include Hertz Corp. v. Friend, Carachuri-Rosendo v. Holder, and Skilling v. U.S. Mr. Srinivasan will discuss Supreme Court advocacy in statutory interpretation cases through the lens of personal lessons and ideas he has gained from cases he argued last Term. He will offer advice about constructing an argument, what to focus on and aim for, some dos and don'ts, and share his thoughts about Supreme Court arguments more generally. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    David C. Frederick, Counsel of Record for the Respondent, moots this upcoming case, which is scheduled to be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court on December 7, 2010. At issue is (1) whether a mutual fund's investment advisor can be held primarily liable under Section 10(b) and Rule 10b-5 for having "made" false or misleading statements or omissions in the mutual fund's prospectus, and (2) whether the reliance element of a private 10(b) action - i.e., whether investors relied on statements by the investment advisor - can be satisfied when the prospectus does not expressly attribute the statements to the advisor.
    Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. This is a closed event. Attendance is limited to Duke Law faculty, students, and staff only. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    A leading authority on Supreme Court practice and nationally recognized expert on criminal procedure, Professor Fisher will talk about marshaling originalism and related interpretive methodologies in order to persuade conservative judges to protect the rights of criminal defendants. More generally, he will also discuss how the United States Supreme Court might change now with its two new justices. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. This event will be webcast. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    (Attendance open to Duke Law faculty, students, and staff only)
    Gregory S. Coleman, Counsel of Record for the Petitioner, and Edward S. Dawson moot this upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case, scheduled to be argued on October 13, 2010. The panel of judges for the moot includes Dean David F. Levi and Duke Law Professors Neil Siegel, Donald Ayer, Curtis Bradley, James Coleman, Theresa Newman, and Ernest Young.
    Question presented: Whether a convicted prisoner seeking access to biological evidence for DNA testing may assert that claim in a civil rights action under 42 U.S.C. § 1983, or whether such a claim may be asserted only in a petition for writ of habeas corpus.
    Sponsored by the Program in Public Law for Duke Law faculty and students only. For more information, please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Join the Program in Public Law for a commemorative look at the U.S. Constitution on the anniversary of its signing. Neil Siegel will moderate this distinguished panel. James Boyle (Duke Law), Michael Munger (Duke University), and Jedediah Purdy (Duke Law) will discuss the Constitution not just as a legal document, but also as a political and cultural institution, reflecting on the role of the Constitution in American life, both historically and today. For more information please contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Judge Richard Leon of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia will discuss his experience deciding terrorism-related detainee cases, including Boumediene v. Bush. Lunch provided. Sponsored by ACS and the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact James Pearce (james.pearce@duke.edu).

  • Law School 3037

    "Drawing Lines: The Future of Redistricting in America" will look forward to the major issues in redistricting as America prepares to begin the 2010 Census. The symposium will feature a number of major election law scholars, political scientists, computer scientists, and state officials examining the major questions about this and future redistricting cycles. Among the subjects: Is it possible or desirable to have an apolitical redistricting process? How will open-source computer programs change redistricting debates? And what is the future of the majority-minority district?

    The symposium will feature a lunchtime keynote speech by Heather Gerken of Yale Law School.

    Event hosted by the Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy, and sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the American Constitution Society. For more information, contact Tobias Coleman at tobias.coleman@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Adam Mortara, lecturer at the University of Chicago and Duke Law professor Neil Siegel will debate the value of having diversity in the federal judiciary. Lunch provided. Sponsored by the American Constitution Society, the Federalist Society, and Program in Public Law. For more information, contact James Pearce (james.pearce@duke.edu).

  • Law School 3041

    Professor Neil Siegel and Lawyer Sarah Jessica Farber from NC Prisoner Legal Services will present a lively discussion on the legal and political issues raised by the "Bowden inmates" release/non-release from NC prisons. Sponsored by the Law School's Center for Criminal Justice and Professional Responsibility and the Program in Public Law. Lunch provided. For more information, contact Debbie Upchurch at upchurch@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3043

    Please join Donald Ayer, Counsel of Record for Petitioner, and judge panelists Dean David Levi and Professors Sara Beale, Lisa Griffin, and Samuel Buell, as they moot the upcoming Supreme Court case United States v. Weyhrauch. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    United States v. Comstock is the first case that the Roberts Court will decide concerning the scope of Congress's powers in Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution. The primary issue in the case concerns the federal government's practice of keeping convicted sex offenders in federal prisons after they have completed their sentences on the ground that they remain sexually dangerous. The question presented is not whether this practice violates any individual constitutional rights of sex offenders, but whether the practice falls within Congress's enumerated powers. Judges: Dean David F. Levi and Professors Donald B. Ayer, Sara S. Beale, Neil S. Siegel, and Ernest A. Young. Counsel for respondents: G. Alan DuBois. Attendance limited to Duke Law students, faculty, and staff. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Duke Law professors Joseph Blocher, Marin Levy,
    and Leticia Saucedo will consider the personal and professional background of Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor in an attempt to imagine the sort of justice that she is most likely to become both methodologically and ideologically. Topics will include areas of the law in which she may vote differently than Justice David Souter did; the potential relevance of her ethnic background to the way in which she will execute her judicial responsibilities; and the possible effects that her varied legal experiences will have on how she approaches the job. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Supreme Court Moot with Patricia Millett:
    United States v. Stevens

    Neil Siegel will serve as the moderator. The Judges Panel includes Don Ayer; Joseph Blocher; Sara Beale; and Stuart Benjamin.

    Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Stuart Benjamin and Ernest Young of Duke Law School and Heather Gerken of Yale Law School, former co-clerks in Justice Souter's chambers, will reunite for a panel discussion to reflect on their time together with the Justice and offer thoughts on how history is likely to remember him. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Duke Law professors Neil Siegel, Stuart Benjamin, Guy-Uriel Charles, and Lisa Kern Griffin will discuss some of the most important Supreme Court decisions from the October 2008 Term. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Please join former Texas solicitor general Gregory Coleman of Yetter, Warden & Coleman as he argues the case for the appellant in Northwest Austin Municipal Utility District Number One v. Holder before Professors Neil Siegel, Christopher Schroeder, Guy-Uriel Charles, Ernie Young, and Stuart Benjamin. This case, which will be argued before the Supreme Court on April 29, is a challenge to the constitutionality of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, which requires prior review before changes in voting laws can be enacted in certain states. After the law was extended by Congress and signed by President George W. Bush in 2006, a small municipal utility district in Texas filed suit to be exempted from the requirement, arguing that the preclearance rules were outdated. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3037

    Judge Richard Leon is a federal judge in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Professor Christopher Schroeder will conduct an interview with Leon about some of his more interesting decisions, namely those surrounding the GITMO detainees, and his career path. Then Leon will answer questions from students. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Patricia Richman at patricia.richman@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School Star Commons

    The U.S. Treasury is injecting billions of dollars into the nation's banks and new restrictions are being imposed on banks receiving help. Many experts and politicians now argue that nothing short of formal nationalization will resolve the financial crisis. What does this mean for U.S. banks, consumers, the role of regulators, and free enterprise? Join a panel discussion on the future of the American banking system. Panelists include Robert K. Steel, member of the board, Wells Fargo, and former president, CEO of Wachovia Corp.; Edward Greene, partner, Cleary Gottlieb and former investments general counsel, Citigroup; Craig Burnside, Duke Professor of Economics; James Cox, Duke Professor of Law; Steven Schwarcz, Duke Professor of Law and Business; Bill Brown, Duke Visiting Professor of the Practice; and moderator Lawrence Baxter, Duke Visiting Professor of the Practice. A reception will follow. Sponsored by the Duke Program in Public Law.

  • Law School 3041

    Missouri Law School Professor Carl Esbeck and Chris Anders, ACLU senior legislative counsel, will discuss the history and constitutionality of the federal faith-based initiative office, as well as the various particular issues raised by the implementation of its programs, including whether religious organizations who receive federal funds can discriminate in their hiring on a religious basis. Begun by President Bush, President Obama has vowed to continue the initiative, albeit with certain changes. What may those changes mean for federal faith-based initiatives, constitutionally and practically? Sponsored by the Duke Law Christian Legal Society, The Federalist Society, Duke Law Democrats, Duke ACLU, and the Program in Public Law. Lunch provided. For more information, please contact Jon Christman at jonathan.christman@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Professor Jeffrey Fisher, associate professor at Stanford Law School and co-director of its Supreme Court Litigation Clinic, will talk about his work on Exxon v. Baker, a case that grew out of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, and the implications of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent opinion for punitive damages law. Fisher will discuss some of the challenges of litigating a case concerning an event that occurred almost 20 years ago and 4,000 miles away against the world's most profitable corporation. Fisher represented the class of more than 32,000 victims of the spill, including commercial fishermen, private landowners, and Alaska Natives before the Ninth Circuit and U.S. Supreme Court; Duke Law Professor Walter Dellinger represented Exxon. Sponsored by the Alaska Law Review, Program in Public Law, Environmental Law Society, Business Law Society, and DBA.

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    Nicholas Marsh '98, trial attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice, criminal division, public integrity section, to discuss a number of topics relating to the investigation and prosecution of federal criminal cases, and in particular how those topics apply to public corruption matters. He will also speak about the considerations relevant to initiating a public corruption investigation, the different statutory and prosecutive approaches available to federal prosecutors, and some of the unique challenges that public corruption prosecutions present. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    A moot court with the attorney, Robert Peck of the Center for Constitutional Litigation, for the respondent in the case of Philip Morris v. Williams which is before the U.S. Supreme Court. Open to students. Lunch provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Julian Yap at yap@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Professor Curtis Bradley will discuss lessons learned from the Bush Administration's treatment of international law, on issues such as the establishment of the International Criminal Court, the treatment of terrorist suspects at Guantanamo, and the war in Iraq. The Bush Administration is often portrayed as not taking international law seriously and routinely disregarding it whenever it is perceived to be inconsistent with (short term) U.S. interests. Bradley will explain how this portrayal is both too simplistic and in some ways untrue. Critics are right that the Administration's approach to international law has been problematic, but this has not been because the Administration has disregarded international law, but rather because it has sometimes focused too much on law to the exclusion of other, pragmatic considerations. Lunch provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Join Duke Law Professors Christopher Schroeder, Ernest Young, Katharine Bartlett, and Lisa Griffin as they discuss environmental law, preemption, anti-discrimination, and criminal-related cases in this Supreme Court update. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

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    Neil J. Kinkopf, professor of law at Georgia State University, to examine the Bush administration and executive power through a question posed by Niccolo Machiavelli in The Prince: Is it better to be loved or feared? Lunch provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

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    Duke Law students, faculty, and staff are invited to watch the election returns come in on the big screen in Star Commons. Food and beverages provided. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law, Duke Bar Association, and Fuqua MBAA.

  • Law School 3041

    Pamela S. Karlan, one of the nation's leading experts on voting and the political process, to speak about the protection of voting rights, electoral administration, and redistricting under the Bush administration and what lessons we can take from the last eight years. Karlan has participated in extensive pro bono litigation representing civil rights and civil liberties groups, minority voters, elected officials, and others. On the basis of her voting rights work, the American Lawyer named her one of its Public Sector 45, a group of young lawyers "actively using their law degrees to change lives." Sponsored by the Program in Public Law and the Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Michael Scharf '88 is Professor of Law and Director of the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Scharf served on the team of experts that provided training to the judges and prosecutors of the Iraqi Special Tribunal and the of the U.N. Cambodia Genocide Tribunal. He and the Public International Law and Policy Group were nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for the work they have done to help in the prosecution of major war criminals. Lunch served. Sponsored by CICL, LENS, the Office of Public Interest & Pro Bono, and the Program in Public Law.

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    Goodwin Liu, assistant professor at Boalt Hall University of California-Berkeley and co-director of the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity, to examine the Bush administration's approach to civil rights in several areas including turmoil within the Civil Rights division of the U.S. Department of Justice, the administration's legal positions in affirmative action and desegregation cases, and Bush's signature civil rights initiative. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Professors Chris Schroeder, Curt Bradley, Guy Charles, and Ernie Young review the most significant decisions of the past term of the U.S. Supreme Court. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law. For more information, contact Dana Norvell at norvell@law.duke.edu.

  • Law School 3041

    Davis Strauss, Gerald Ratner Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago School of Law, to launch lecture series on key legal and constitutional policy issues arising during the Bush administration. Strauss has served as special counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee, Assistant Solicitor General of the United States, and argued eighteen cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. Sponsored by the Program in Public Law.