Videos

2018

  • Duke Law Tech Lab | 2018 Demo Day + Celebration
    December 04, 2018 - The Duke Center on Law & Tech hosted the 2018 Duke Law Tech Lab Demo Day + Celebration on October 5, 2018 at the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Bullpen in downtown Durham. The event was the culmination of the light-touch legal tech accelerator hosted. This event was also sponsored by Latham & Watkins, Thomson Reuters, and Travelers Insurance, as well as NC Community Sponsors, Lawyers Mutual Insurance Company of NC and Smith Anderson.
    Tech Lab | Jeff Ward | Center on Law & Technology | Productions
  • Juliana v. United States: The Constitutional Implications of Climate Change
    November 14, 2018 - Duke Law panelists disuss Juliana v. United States, a case the Supreme Court allowed to proceed in the 9th Circuit, which concerns the constitutional and public trust implications of climate change. Specifically, the youth plaintiffs argue that (1) the United States' actions that have contributed to climate change have unconstitutionally deprived future generations' right to life, liberty, and property; and (2) that the atmosphere is protected by the Public Trust Doctrine. Co-sponsored by Duke's Environmental Law Society, American Constitution Society, Federalist Society, and Environmental Law and Policy Clinic. Appearing: Molly Bruce (Student-Duke Law School), moderator; Jedediah Purdy (Duke Law School), Ernest A. Young (Duke Law School) and Ryke Longest (Duke Law School).
    Ernest A. Young | Jedediah Purdy | Ryke Longest | Molly Bruce | Environmental Law Society | American Constitution Society | Federalist Society | Environmental Law and Policy Clinic | Environmental Law | Panels | Events
  • Aisling Reidy & Christine Ryan | Ireland's Referendum Repealing the Abortion Ban
    November 14, 2018 - Aisling Reidy of Human Rights Watch and Christine Ryan, S.J.D. candidate and Fulbright Fellow, Duke Law, discuss the Irish abortion referendum and women's rights internationally. Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Senior Lecturing Fellow and Supervising Attorney of the Duke International Human Rights Clinic moderates. This talk is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, which is organized by the Duke International Human Rights Clinic and the Center for International and Comparative Law. The event is one of many presented as part of "Duke at Home in the World," a program of the Duke University Office of Global Affairs, throughout November 2018. The talk is co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, the Human Rights Law Society, and the International Law Society.
    Human Rights in Practice | International Human Rights Clinic | Human Rights | Human Rights Law Society | International Law Society | Aya Fujimura-Fanselow | Aisling Reidy | Christine Ryan | Women and the Law | Events
  • Torture Flights: North Carolina's Role in the CIA's Rendition and Torture Program
    November 12, 2018 - Professor Jim Coleman, Duke Law and a N.C. Commission of Inquiry on Torture (NCCIT) Commissioner; Dr. Christina Cowger, coordinator of N.C. Stop Torture Now; Professor Jayne Huckerby, Duke Law and an expert witness for and advisor to the NCCIT; Professor Robin Kirk, Duke's Department of Cultural Anthropology and Commissioner and Co-Chair of the NCCIT; Catherine Read, Executive Director of the NCCIT; and, Mohamedou Ould Slahi, author, Guantánamo Diary (via Skype); discuss the work of the Commission, a non-governmental and state-level inquiry into North Carolina's role in the CIA's post-9/11 rendition, detention, and interrogation program. This is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, organized by Duke Law's International Human Rights Clinic and the Center for International and Comparative Law. The event is co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, the Human Rights Law Society, and the International Law Society.
    Center for International & Comparative Law | Human Rights | Human Rights Law Society | International Law Society | Human Rights in Practice | International Human Rights Clinic | Mohamedou Ould Slah | James E. Coleman Jr. | Christina Cowger | Jayne Huckerby | Robin Kirk | Catherine Read | Aya Fujimura-Fanselow | Events
  • Bolch Judicial Institute | 51 Imperfect Solutions: A Judicial Roundtable
    November 08, 2018 - David Levi (Director of the Bolch Judicial Institute), Judge Jeffrey Sutton (United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit), Judge Joan Larsen (United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit), Judge Allison Eid (United States Court of Appeals, Tenth Circuit), and Justice Goodwin Liu (Supreme Court of California) discuss Judge Sutton's book, "51 Imperfect Solutions: States and the Making of American Constitutional Law." (Oxford University Press, 2018). Sponsored by the Bolch Judicial Institute.
    Bolch Judicial Institute | Goodwin Liu | Jeffrey Sutton | Joan Larsen | Allison H. Eid | Panels | Constitutional Law | Events
  • Bernstein Lecture 2018 | Sundaresh Menon, Executive Power: Rethinking the Modalities of Control
    November 01, 2018 - The Honorable Sundaresh Menon, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Singapore, delivered the 2018-2019 Bernstein Lecture in Comparative Law titled "Executive Power: Rethinking the Modalities of Control." The Chief Justice discussed the control of executive power in Singapore as compared to other legal systems. Co-sponsored by the Center for International and Comparative Law and the Office of the Dean.
    Herbert L. Bernstein Memorial Lecture in International and Comparative Law | Sundaresh Menon | Comparative Law | Lectures | Ralf Michaels | Kerry Abrams | Events
  • Lena Salaymeh | The Beginnings of Islamic Law
    October 30, 2018 - Professor Lena Salaymeh, Tel Aviv University and Princeton University, discusses her award-winning book, "The Beginnings of Islamic Law: Late Antique Islamicate Legal Traditions" (Cambridge University Press, 2016). Showing how Muslim jurists crafted their legal opinions by combining ancient norms, scripture, religious and scholarly precedents, local traditions, and social needs in unexpected ways, Prof. Salaymeh challenges modern preconceptions of Islamic law and illustrates the dynamic nature of Islamic jurisprudence in a contemporary setting. The program is a joint presentation of Duke Law's Center for International and Comparative Law, Duke University's Islamic Studies Center, and Duke University's Department of Religious Studies. Recorded on October 30, 2018
    Lena Salaymeh | Center for International & Comparative Law | Lectures | Events
  • Bolch Judicial Institute | Jon O. Newman, Federal Sentencing: The Good, the Bad & the Awful
    October 30, 2018 - Judge Jon O. Newman of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit discusses Federal Sentencing: the Good, the Bad, and the Awful. Judge Newman serves as the inaugural Distinguished Judge in Residence at the Bolch Judicial Institute during the week of October 29, 2018. Sponsored by the Bolch Judicial Institute. Appearing: Jon O. Newman (2d Cir.), speaker; Marin Levy (Duke Law School), introductions.
    Bolch Judicial Institute | Lectures | Marin Levy | Jon O. Newman | Events
  • Bolch Judicial Institute | David F. Levi & Jon O. Newman, Judgment Calls
    October 29, 2018 - David F. Levi, director of the Bolch Judicial Institute and Levi Family Professor of Law and Judicial Studies, and Judge Jon O. Newman of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, discuss Judge Newman's life in the judiciary, his recent book, and what he thinks should to be done to improve the U.S. justice system. Judge Newman served as the inaugural Distinguished Judge in Residence at the Bolch Judicial Institute during the week of October 29, 2018. Sponsored by the Bolch Judicial Institute.
    Bolch Judicial Institute | Jon O. Newman | Dean David F. Levi | Events
  • Catherine Sweetser | Litigating Human Rights in the Federal Courts
    October 25, 2018 - Catherine Sweetser, attorney at Schonbrun Seplow Harris & Hoffman LLP, discussed her work in the area of international human rights including her specialization in Alien Tort Statute litigation and the Trafficking Victims Protections Reauthorization Act. This talk is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, which is organized by the International Human Rights Clinic and the Center for International and Comparative Law. The event is also co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, the Human Rights Law Society, and the International Law Society. Recorded on October 25, 2018.
    Human Rights in Practice | Human Rights | Center for International & Comparative Law | International Human Rights Clinic | Human Rights Law Society | International Law Society | Catherine Sweetser | Curtis A. Bradley | Events
  • Fighting Digital Threats: The Role of Government and Social Media Platforms
    October 18, 2018 - Former Homeland Security Advisor Tom Bossert and Facebook's Head of Global Policy Monika Bickert discuss the challenges of and opportunities for both government and the private sector for addressing digital threats, especially those utilizing social media platforms. Sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security.
    Tom Bossert | Monika Bickert | Panels | Center on Law, Ethics and National Security | National Security | Events
  • Jerome Reichman | Governing Digitally Integrated Genetic Resources, Data, and Literature
    October 17, 2018 - Jerome H. Reichman, Bunyan S. Womble Professor of Law, discussed his book "Governing Digitally Integrated Genetic Resources, Data, and Literature: Global Intellectual Property Strategies for a Redesigned Microbial Research Commons." (Cambridge 2016). James Boyle, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law, provided introductory remarks. Sponsored by the Goodson Law Library and Office of the Dean.
    Jerome H. Reichman | Goodson Law Library | Dean's Office | James Boyle | Intellectual Property | Lectures | Events
  • ALR Symposium 2018: 60 Years Later | A Comparative Perspective of the Alaska Constitution
    October 12, 2018 - This presentation seeks to clarify what is distinctive about the Alaska Constitution by placing it in comparative perspective. This begins with a review of the characteristics of state constitutions themselves, in contrast to the more familiar United States Constitution. Next, an introduction to the New Judicial Federalism, whereby state high courts may interpret, or at least consider interpreting, their own state constitutions to provide more protective rights than those under the US Constitution. This is one of the most important developments in state constitutional law, and Alaska is part of it. Finally, the presentation evaluates selected Alaska constitutional provisions and doctrines in the larger context of American state constitutional law. The symposium is co-sponsored by the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Law Review in cooperation with the Historians Committee of the Alaska Bar Association Recorded on October 12, 2018. Appearing: G. Alan Tarr (Rutgers University, Center for State Constitution Studies) and Robert Williams (Rutgers School of Law, Center for State Constitution Studies)
    ALR Symposium | G. Alan Tarr | Robert F. Williams | Panels | Constitutional Law | Alaska Law Review | Events
  • ALR Symposium 2018: 60 Years Later | Erwin Chemerinsky, Keynote Address
    October 12, 2018 - In anticipation of the sixtieth anniversary of Alaska statehood, "60 Years Later: The Alaska Constitution, History in Context" was at the University of Alaska Anchorage - Alaska Pacific University Consortium Library. The symposium is co-sponsored by the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Law Review in cooperation with the Historians Committee of the Alaska Bar Association Recorded on October 12, 2018
    ALR Symposium | Erwin Chemerinsky | Lectures | Alaska Law Review | Events
  • ALR Symposium 2018: 60 Years Later | Vic Fischer & Sen Tan, Lunch Conversation
    October 12, 2018 - Vic Fischer was one of the delegates to the Alaska Constitutional Convention in the winter of 1955-1956, and he was strongly involved in planning for the 2009 celebration of 50 years of Alaska statehood. Fischer was the first director of the University of Alaska’s Institute of Social and Economic Research, and he has studied and taken part in Alaska government and politics for over 50 years. He was a territorial legislator, a delegate to Alaska’s constitutional convention, and later a state senator. In 1974, he authored “Alaska's Constitutional Convention” (University of Alaska Press), which was number nine of the National Municipal League's series State Constitutional Convention Studies. Fischer is an honorary Doctor of Science via the Russian Academy of Economics (Plekhanov). He continues to be engaged in state policy, local government, and Alaska-Russia issues. In 2006 he received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from UAA. In 2012 he published his autobiography, To Russia With Love. Sen K. Tan was the presiding superior court judge for the Third Judicial District in Anchorage, Alaska. Judge Tan was appointed on December 4, 1996, by Governor Tony Knowles. He retired on July 1, 2014. He served as the presiding judge of the court from 2011 to through 2013. Judge Tan graduated from the University of Kent in 1978 with a Bachelor of Arts in Law. In 1982 he graduated with his J.D. from the Northeastern University School of Law in Massachusetts. The symposium is co-sponsored by the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Law Review in cooperation with the Historians Committee of the Alaska Bar Association Recorded on October 12, 2018 Appearing: Vic Fischer (Member of the Alaska Constitutional Convention) & Hon. Sen Tan (Alaska Superior Court, ret.)
    ALR Symposium | Sen Tan | Vic Fischer | Alaska Law Review | Constitutional Law | Events
  • ALR Symposium 2018: 60 Years Later | Michael Schwaiger, Lunch Presentation
    October 12, 2018 - Michael Schwaiger presents unpublished materials written by the late Honorable Tom Stewart, who was the Secretary of the Alaska Constitutional Convention. The symposium is co-sponsored by the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Law Review in cooperation with the Historians Committee of the Alaska Bar Association Recorded on October 12, 2018. Michael Schwaiger (Alaska Bar Association, Historians Committee)
    Michael Schwaiger | Lectures | ALR Symposium | Alaska Law Review | Constitutional Law | Events
  • ALR Symposium 2018: 60 Years Later | A Native Perspective of Alaska’s Constitution
    October 12, 2018 - Due to the unique history of the territory and State of Alaska, and the social, political and legislative treatment of its indigenous inhabitants, Alaska’s Constitution has an extraordinary impact on the legal rights of Alaska Natives. Willie "Iggiagruk” Hensley was a young Inupiaq man living in remote rural Alaska at the time of the constitutional convention. He presents the perspective of Alaska Natives in the drafting and ratification of the Alaska Constitution. Willie served in the Alaska Legislature, was a leader in the settlement of Alaska Native aboriginal land claims and has had many other experiences which have given him a close look at how the constitution impacts the rights and lives of Alaska Natives. John M. “Sky" Starkey follows Willie’s presentation with some thoughts and legal analysis on how Alaskan courts can incorporate consideration of the near exclusion of Alaska Native representatives and perspectives in the drafting of the constitution when they consider constitutional issues with significant impact on Alaska Natives. He concentrates on the natural resource provisions of Article VIII of the constitution and issues related to Alaska Native hunting and fishing. The symposium is co-sponsored by the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Law Review in cooperation with the Historians Committee of the Alaska Bar Association Recorded on October 12, 2018. Appearing: John “Sky” Starkey (Landye Bennett Blumstein LLP) and Willie Hensley (University of Alaska Anchorage)
    ALR Symposium | Panels | Alaska Law Review | John Starkey | Willie Hensley | Constitutional Law | Events
  • ALR Symposium 2018: 60 Years Later | The Alaska Judicial Council & Merit Selection of Judges
    October 12, 2018 - The Alaska Judicial Council, created in Article IV, Section 8 of the State’s Constitution, carries out the duties of the merit selection system created by the Constitution. In this presentation, Dosik details the article by herself and Teresa W. Carns describing how the Council developed its procedures from statehood forward, and what they are at the present. Drawing on Council meeting minutes, files, and reports starting with the Council’s first meeting on May 18 and 19, 1959 in Juneau, the article covers all aspects of applying to be considered for judicial positions: the application, investigations, bar surveys, standards for nomination to the governor, interviews, voting, and transmission of results to the governor. The article includes a brief discussion of Council actions to continue to improve the process, and to increase public and bar participation in selection and retention matters, as envisioned at the Constitutional Convention. The judicial selection and retention provisions of the Alaska Constitution, found in Article IV, achieve a delicate and remarkably successful balance between two competing interests—judicial independence and popular sovereignty. The purpose of this article, written by Brett Frazer and Walter Carpeneti and presented by Frazer, is to describe this constitutional plan, (called “merit selection” because it begins with nomination based on merit alone, as determined by a panel comprised of members of the state bar and the general public), explain why the founders adopted it, examine historical challenges to it, and assess its performance on the 60th anniversary of Alaska statehood. The authors ultimately conclude that Alaska's merit selection system has performed well, insulating judges from the worst of politics while still allowing some democratic controls on the composition of the judiciary. The symposium is co-sponsored by the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Law Review in cooperation with the Historians Committee of the Alaska Bar Association Recorded on October 12, 2018 Appearing: Brett Frazer (Latham & Watkins) and Susan Mason Dosik (Alaska Judicial Council)
    ALR Symposium | Panels | Alaska Law Review | Constitutional Law | Brett Frazer | Susan Mason Dosik | Events
  • Lange Lecture 2018 | Jessica Littman, Before and After the Copyright Wars
    October 04, 2018 - Jessica Litman, the John F. Nickoll Professor of Law at the University of Michigan, delivered the 2018 David L. Lange Lecture in Intellectual Property, "Before and After the Copyright Wars." Prof. Litman is the author of "Digital Copyright," which traces the history of lobbying that led to the passage in 1998 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. She is also the co-author, with Jane Ginsburg and Mary Lou Kevlin, of the casebook "Trademarks and Unfair Competition Law: Cases and Materials." Before rejoining the Michigan faculty in 2006, she was a professor of law at Wayne State University in Detroit, a visiting professor at New York University School of Law and at American University Washington College of Law, as well as a professor at Michigan Law from 1984 to 1990. Sponsored by the Office of the Dean.
    Jessica Litman | Intellectual Property | Lange Lecture | Dean's Office | Events
  • James Freeman & Vern McKinley | Borrowed Time: Citibank, Moral Hazard, and the Too Big to Fail Myth
    September 25, 2018 - During the 2008 financial crisis, Citigroup was presented as the victim of events beyond its control - larger financial panic, unforeseen economic disruptions, and a perfect storm of credit expansion, private greed, and public incompetence. To save the economy and keep the bank afloat, the government provided huge infusions of cash through multiple bailouts that angered the American public. But, as financial experts James Freeman and Vern McKinley reveal, the 2008 crisis was just one of many disasters Citi has experienced since its founding more than 200 years ago. In Borrowed Time, they reveal Citi's history of instability and government support. Freeman and McKinley discussed insights from their book and offered students a chance to learn how prepared the federal government is for the next financial crisis. Sponsored by the Global Financial Markets Center.
    Global Financial Markets Center | Vern McKinley | Corporate Law | Events
  • Duke Law | Jessup Cup Final Round 2018
    September 24, 2018 - The final round of the 2018 Jessup Cup moot court competition. Jessup Cup finalists Eric Roytman and Brent McKnight argued the case concerning the Egart and the Ibra before a mock International Court of Justice. The finalists were judged by a faculty panel including Professors Curtis Bradley, Jayne Huckerby, and Ralf Michaels." Recorded on September 24, 2018. Sponsored by the Moot Court Board
    International Law | Curtis A. Bradley | Jayne Huckerby | Ralf Michaels | Moot Court Board | Jessup Cup | Moot Courts | Eric Roytman | Brent McKnight | Students | Student Affairs | Events
  • David Tolbert | Transitional Justice in the 21st Century: Current Developments and Challenges
    September 20, 2018 - David Tolbert, Ford Foundation Fellow and Visiting Scholar at the Sanford School of Public Policy and former president of the International Center for Transitional Justice, discusses current developments and challenges in the field of transitional justice, providing examples from his work in Colombia, Tunisia, and other contexts. He shares his insights into where the field of transitional justice is heading in the current difficult and challenging political context. This talk is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, which is organized by the International Human Rights Clinic and the Center for International and Comparative Law. The event is also co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, the Human Rights Law Society, and the International Law Society.
    Human Rights in Practice | Human Rights Law Society | International Law Society | International Human Rights Clinic | Center for International & Comparative Law | David Tolbert | Events
  • Laurence Ball | The Fed and Lehman Brothers
    September 12, 2018 - The bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers was the pivotal event of the 2008 financial crisis. Ever since the bankruptcy, there's been heated debate about why the Federal Reserve did not rescue Lehman in the same way it rescued other financial institutions. The Fed's leaders strongly asserted that they lacked the legal authority to save Lehman because it did not have adequate collateral for the loan it needed to survive. In his new book, "The Fed and Lehman Brothers", Laurence Ball argues that the official narrative of the crisis is wrong; the Fed could have rescued Lehman but chose not to because of political pressures and an underestimation of the damage the bankruptcy would do to the economy. In this video, Mr. Ball, a professor of economics at Johns Hopkins, discusses insights from his book. Sponsored by the Global Financial Markets Center.
    Laurence Ball | Global Financial Markets Center | Events
  • Samuel Moyn | Humane: The Politics and Poetics of Endless War
    September 07, 2018 - From the Human Rights in Practice Series: Samuel Moyn, Yale Law School, asks what is wrong with "forever war" - as the post-9/11 campaigns of the United States have been called. For a broad swath of critics, the trouble is its inhumanity - especially the peril it brings to civilians. What, however, if the opposite is true - and the problem is that the war on terror is the most humane war ever fought in history? Moyn offers some early hypotheses for collective discussion as part of a new project on the stakes of making war more humane when there are no strong controls on its chronological or geographical scope. Moderated by Prof. Jayne Huckerby. Sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic, the Center for International and Comparative Law, and the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security.
    International Human Rights Clinic | Center for International & Comparative Law | Center on Law, Ethics and National Security | International Law | Human Rights | National Security | Jayne Huckerby | Samuel Moyn | Human Rights in Practice | Events
  • Trump v. Hawaii & The Shadow of Korematsu
    September 04, 2018 - A panel discussion about Trump v. Hawaii and the travel ban litigation in relation to the legacy of the Japanese-American exclusion orders and internment during WWII. The panel features Dean Kerry Abrams, an expert on immigration law, Professor Eric Muller from UNC Law School, an expert on the Japanese-American exclusion cases, and Pratik Shah, co-head of Akin Gump's Supreme Court and Appellate practice. Duke Law Professor Matthew Adler moderates. Sponsored by the American Constitution Society and the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association.
    Asian Pacific American Law Students Association | Constitutional Law | Kerry Abrams | Eric L. Muller | Pratik A. Shah | Matthew D. Adler | American Constitution Society | Events
  • Duke Law | LEAD Week 2018
    August 29, 2018 - This year's LEAD Fellows offer advice to the incoming class. LEAD Fellows serve as orientation leaders for small groups of first-year students during LEAD Week. Throughout the remainder of the year, LEAD Fellows serve as advisers to their LEAD groups and help them navigate their first year at Duke Law.
    Students | Events
  • Eyewitness Evidence in the Courts
    August 21, 2018 - Eyewitness testimony can be incredibly powerful in court. However, we now know that eyewitness memory is fragile and malleable. This panel, with leading scientists, lawyers, and judges, moderated by Professor Brandon Garrett, explores how eyewitness misidentifications can cause wrongful convictions. Panelists also discuss scientific research on improving the reliability of eyewitness identification, and how to address these questions in the courtroom. Panelists include: Judge Theodore McKee, U.S. Circuit Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, and chair of a task force on jury instructions on eyewitness identification evidence; Karen Newirth, Senior staff attorney of the Innocence Project, litigates eyewitness memory issues nationwide; Thomas Albright, Professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, co-chaired the National Academy of Sciences' report on eyewitness memory and law; Benjamin David, District Attorney, 5th District (New Hanover and Pender Counties) NC, and past president of the NC Conference of District Attorneys; Jennifer Thompson, founder of Healing Justice, co-author, Picking Cotton, and national advocate for eyewitness identification reform. Sponsored by the Center for Criminal Justice and Professional Responsibility and the Wrongful Convictions Clinic.
    Brandon L. Garrett | Theodore McKee | Karen Newirth | Thomas Albright | Benjamin David | Jennifer Thompson-Cannino | Criminal Law | Events | Wrongful Convictions Clinic | Events
  • Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg discusses the 2017-18 Supreme Court term
    August 01, 2018 - Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg discusses the Court's 2017-18 term, followed by an interview with Duke Law Professor Neil S. Siegel. This event was sponsored by Duke Law and Duke DC, and held in the Washington office of Jones Day on August 1, 2018.
    Ruth Bader Ginsburg | Supreme Court | DC Summer Institute | Constitutional Law | Neil S. Siegel. | Events
  • Duke Law Graduation 2018 | Michael J. Sorrell '94 MPP '90
    May 12, 2018 - Michael J. Sorrell '94 MPP '90 addressed Duke Law's Class of 2018 at their May 12 convocation ceremony in Cameron Indoor Stadium. Sorrell, the president of Paul Quinn College in Dallas, is the only two-time recipient of the HBCU Male President of the Year Award, has been named Father of the Year in the city of Dallas, and was recently named one of the world's 50 greatest leaders by Fortune magazine.
    Michael J. Sorrell | Graduation | hooding ceremony | Events
  • Duke Law Graduation 2018 | Justice David Collins MJS '18
    May 12, 2018 - Justice David Collins of the High Court of New Zealand spoke on behalf of his classmates in the Master of Judicial Studies Program at Duke Law School's May 12 convocation ceremony in Cameron Indoor Stadium.
    David Collins | Graduation | hooding ceremony | Events
  • Duke Law Graduation 2018 | David Shoichi Kuwabara '18
    May 12, 2018 - David Shoichi Kuwabara '18 was selected by his JD classmates to speak on their behalf at Duke Law's May 12 graduation ceremony in Cameron Indoor Stadium.
    David Shoichi Kuwabara | hooding ceremony | Graduation | Events
  • Duke Law Graduation 2018 | David Kryzanovsky LLM '18
    May 12, 2018 - David Kryzanovsky LLM '18 was selected by his classmates in the international law program to speak on their behalf at Duke Law's May 12 convocation ceremony in Cameron Indoor Stadium.
    David Kryzanovsky | Graduation | hooding ceremony | Events
  • AI in the Administrative State | Concluding Thoughts
    May 04, 2018 - Moderator: Jonathan Wiener, Duke Law School, Rethinking Regulation Program at The Kenan Institute for Ethics

    J.B. Ruhl, Vanderbilt Law
     Group discussion Artificial intelligence (AI) is being employed in the private sector to optimize production processes, pricing, and other business functions. But apart from national security and law enforcement, productive uses in the public sector have received less attention, despite recognition that the administrative state's foremost challenges include efficient processing of ever-increasing amounts of data, and adapting to new information over time. Duke Law's Center for Innovation Policy, Duke Law's Center on Law & Technology, Duke Science & Society, and the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute of Ethics held a joint conference to explore promising uses of AI and the challenges they pose in administering diverse governmental functions involving science, technology, health and intellectual property.
    J.B. Ruhl | Center for Innovation Policy | Jonathan B. Wiener | Panels | Events
  • AI in the Admin State | AI and Biomedical Resource Creation, Biopharmaceuticals and Digital Health
    May 04, 2018 - Moderators: Nita Farahany, Duke Law School, Duke Initiative for Science & Society Arti Rai, Duke Law School, The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law   Sameer Antani, NIH/U.S. National Library of Medicine John Daley, IBM Watson Health Julie Anderson Daughtry, IBM Watson Health Nicholson Price, Michigan Law Artificial intelligence (AI) is being employed in the private sector to optimize production processes, pricing, and other business functions. But apart from national security and law enforcement, productive uses in the public sector have received less attention, despite recognition that the administrative state's foremost challenges include efficient processing of ever-increasing amounts of data, and adapting to new information over time. Duke Law's Center for Innovation Policy, Duke Law's Center on Law & Technology, Duke Science & Society, and the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute of Ethics held a joint conference to explore promising uses of AI and the challenges they pose in administering diverse governmental functions involving science, technology, health and intellectual property.
    Julie Anderson Daughtry | Arti Rai | Center for Innovation Policy | John Daley | Panels | Sameer K. Antani | Nita A. Farahany | Nicholson Price | Events
  • AI in the Administrative State | AI, Automated Vehicles, and Transportation Policy
    May 04, 2018 - AI, Automated Vehicles, and Transportation Policy Moderator: Jeff Ward, Duke Law School, Duke Center on Law & Technology

    Missy Cummings, Duke University
    Michael Clamann, Duke University
    Bryant Walker Smith, University of South Carolina Law Artificial intelligence (AI) is being employed in the private sector to optimize production processes, pricing, and other business functions. But apart from national security and law enforcement, productive uses in the public sector have received less attention, despite recognition that the administrative state's foremost challenges include efficient processing of ever-increasing amounts of data, and adapting to new information over time. Duke Law's Center for Innovation Policy, Duke Law's Center on Law & Technology, Duke Science & Society, and the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute of Ethics held a joint conference to explore promising uses of AI and the challenges they pose in administering diverse governmental functions involving science, technology, health and intellectual property.
    Panels | Jeff Ward | Michael Clamann | Center for Innovation Policy | Missy Cummings | Bryant Walker Smith | Events
  • AI in the Administrative State | Keynote Addresses
    May 04, 2018 - Marjory Blumenthal, RAND
    Max Stier, Partnership for Public Service Moderators: Stephen Merrill, The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law
    Stuart Benjamin, Duke Law School, The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law Artificial intelligence (AI) is being employed in the private sector to optimize production processes, pricing, and other business functions. But apart from national security and law enforcement, productive uses in the public sector have received less attention, despite recognition that the administrative state's foremost challenges include efficient processing of ever-increasing amounts of data, and adapting to new information over time. Duke Law's Center for Innovation Policy, Duke Law's Center on Law & Technology, Duke Science & Society, and the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute of Ethics held a joint conference to explore promising uses of AI and the challenges they pose in administering diverse governmental functions involving science, technology, health and intellectual property.
    Max Stier | Center for Innovation Policy | Stuart M. Benjamin | Marjory Blumenthal | Panels | Stephen Merrill | Events
  • AI in the Administrative State | Use of AI in IP-Related Search and Classification
    May 04, 2018 - Moderator: Arti Rai, Duke Law School, The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law

    Liat Belinson, AI Patents
    Scott Beliveau, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
    Alex Measure, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor
    Ian Wetherbee, Google Artificial intelligence (AI) is being employed in the private sector to optimize production processes, pricing, and other business functions. But apart from national security and law enforcement, productive uses in the public sector have received less attention, despite recognition that the administrative state's foremost challenges include efficient processing of ever-increasing amounts of data, and adapting to new information over time. Duke Law's Center for Innovation Policy, Duke Law's Center on Law & Technology, Duke Science & Society, and the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute of Ethics held a joint conference to explore promising uses of AI and the challenges they pose in administering diverse governmental functions involving science, technology, health and intellectual property.
    Liat Belinson | Alex Measure | Scott Beliveau | Arti Rai | Panels | Ian Wetherbee | Center for Innovation Policy | Events
  • AI in the Administrative State | Introduction & Overview
    May 04, 2018 - Introductory Remarks
    Stuart Benjamin, Duke Law School, The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law

    Nita Farahany, Duke Law School, Duke Initiative for Science & Society

    Jeff Ward, Duke Law School, Duke Center on Law & Technology Jonathan Wiener, Duke Law School, Rethinking Regulation Program at The Kenan Institute for Ethics Overviews
    Moderator: Lori Bennear, Duke University Nicholas School, Rethinking Regulation Program at The Kenan Institute for Ethics

    Overview: Technology
    Ed Felten, Princeton University

    Overview: Law
    Cary Coglianese, University of Pennsylvania Law School

    Discussant:
    Vince Conitzer, Duke University Artificial intelligence (AI) is being employed in the private sector to optimize production processes, pricing, and other business functions. But apart from national security and law enforcement, productive uses in the public sector have received less attention, despite recognition that the administrative state's foremost challenges include efficient processing of ever-increasing amounts of data, and adapting to new information over time. Duke Law's Center for Innovation Policy, Duke Law's Center on Law & Technology, Duke Science & Society, and the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute of Ethics held a joint conference to explore promising uses of AI and the challenges they pose in administering diverse governmental functions involving science, technology, health and intellectual property.
    Jeff Ward | Nita A. Farahany | Jonathan B. Wiener | Edward Felten | Panels | Vince Conitzer | Lori Bennear | Center for Innovation Policy | Stuart M. Benjamin | Cary Conglianese | Events
  • Darius Charney | Lawyering for Racial Justice
    April 18, 2018 - Darius Charney, Senior Staff Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights, discusses "Lawyering for Racial Justice." He addresses the various ways in which lawyers engage in efforts to achieve racial justice, ranging from litigation to advocacy, media, and partnering with and supporting grassroots social movements and activists. This is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, which is co-sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic, and Center for International and Comparative Law. Additional co-sponsors include the Black Law Students Association, Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, International Law Society, and Human Rights Law Society
    Duke Human RIghts Center | Duke Black Law Students Association | International Human Rights Clinic | Human Rights in Practice | Kenan Institute for Ethics | Franklin Humanities Institute | International Law Society | Center for International and Comparative Law | Human Rights | Events
  • Ben Fountain '83 | Beautiful Country, Burn Again: National Library Week Celebration
    April 12, 2018 - This 2018 National Library Week Alumni Author event featured Ben Fountain '83, critically acclaimed author of the novel "Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk" (2012) and the short story collection "Brief Encounters with Che Guevara" (2006). Fountain discussed his journey from attorney to full-time writer, and shared selected readings from his works of fiction as well as his forthcoming collection of essays on the 2016 election, "Beautiful Country, Burn Again" (2018). Sponsored by the Goodson Law Library.
    Ben Fountain | J. Michael Goodson Law Library | Lectures | Events
  • 2018 Hardt Cup Finals
    April 10, 2018 - The final round of the 2018 Hardt Cup Tournament for first-year students was presided over by the Honorable Eva M. Guzman MJS '14, Supreme Court of Texas, Joseph F. Bianco, Eastern District of New York, and Raymond M. Kethledge, US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Melissa Dix ’20 argued on behalf of the petitioner in a U.S. Supreme Court case involving legislative prayer delivered by legislators. Jack Smith ’20 argued on behalf of the respondent. Sponsored by the Moot Court Board.
    Hardt Cup | Moot Court | Eva M. Guzman | Joseph F. Bianco | Raymond M. Kethledge | Events
  • Lange Lecture 2018 | Jonathan L. Zittrain
    April 04, 2018 - Jonathan L. Zittrain, the George Bemis Professor of International Law and Director of the Law Library at Harvard Law School, delivers the annual David L. Lange Lecture in Intellectual Property Law (formerly named the Meredith and Kip Frey Lecture in Intellectual Property Law). His lecture was titled, "What Yesterday's Copyright Wars Teach Us About Today's Issues in AI."
    Jonathan L. Zittrain | David L. Lange Lecture in Intellectual Property Law | Intellectual Property | James Boyle | Events
  • Lawyering, Creativity, and the Pew Foundation
    March 28, 2018 - Dean David F. Levi and Professor Joel Fleishman moderate a discussion about the law and creativity with Rebecca W. Rimel, president and CEO of The Pew Charitable Trusts, and James G. McMillan, Pew's general counsel. Sponsored by the Office of the Dean
    Dean David F. Levi | Joel L. Fleishman | Rebecca W. Rimel | James G. McMillan | Events
  • Macarena Sáez & Laurence Helfer | New Developments in LGBT Rights within the Inter-American System
    March 08, 2018 - Professor Macarena Sáez, Faculty Director of the Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law and Fellow in International Legal Studies at American University Washington College of Law, and Professor Laurence R. Helfer , Harry R. Chadwick, Sr. Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Center for International and Comparative Law at Duke Law, give a talk titled "New Developments in LGBT Rights within the Inter-American System." This is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, which is co-sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic, and Center for International and Comparative Law. Co-sponsors include Outlaw, Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, International Law Society, and Human Rights Law Society.
    Macarena Sáez | Laurence R. Helfer | International Human Rights Clinic | Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute | Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics | International Law Society | OUTLaw | Human Rights | International Law | Center for International & Comparative Law | Events
  • Currie Lecture 2018 | Jack L. Goldsmith, The Failure of Internet Freedom
    March 07, 2018 - Jack L. Goldsmith, the Henry L. Shattuck Professor of Law at Harvard University, delivers the annual Brainerd Currie Memorial Lecture on "The Failure of Internet Freedom." Goldsmith makes the case that the pursuit of internet regulation policies encouraging individual flourishing, technological innovation, and economic prosperity in the United States have had disastrous consequences abroad and domestically, where a relatively unregulated internet is being used for ill, to a point that threatens basic American institutions. Goldsmith is the author, most recently, of The Terror Presidency: Law and Judgment Inside The Bush Administration (W.W. Norton 2007), as well as other books and articles on many topics related to terrorism, national security, international law, conflicts of law, and internet law. Sponsored by the Office of the Dean.
    Currie Lecture | Dean's Office | Jack L. Goldsmith | Dean David F. Levi | Lectures | Events
  • Radoslaw Nguyen '18 talks about the Duke Law International LLM program
    March 02, 2018 - Radoslaw Nguyen LLM '18, originally from Poland, talks about the Duke Law International LLM program.
    International Studies | International LLM | Radoslaw Nguyen | Productions
  • Kelli Muddell | Gender and Transitional Justice: Challenges from the Field
    February 28, 2018 - Kelli Muddell, Director of the Gender Justice Program at the International Center for Transitional Justice, discusses trends in the field of transitional justice especially with respect to gender-based impacts of violations committed during conflict and under authoritarian regimes as well as how these impacts are addressed post-conflict. This talk was moderated by Professor Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Senior Lecturing Fellow and Supervising Attorney of the Duke International Human Rights Clinic. This is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, which is co-sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic, and Center for International and Comparative Law. Additional co-sponsors include the Coalition Against Gendered Violence, Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, International Law Society, Human Rights Law Society, and Women Law Students Association.
    Human Rights in Practice | Kelli Muddell | Human Rights | International Human Rights Clinic | Center for International and Comparative Law | Coalition Against Gendered Violence | Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute | Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics | International Law Society | Human Rights Law Society | Women Law Students Association | Lectures | International Law | Events
  • LENS 2018: Complexity & Security | Monika Bickert, Keynote: The Social Media Perspective
    February 24, 2018 - Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) held its annual national security conference on February 23–24, 2018 at Duke Law School. The 2018 LENS conference was titled Complexity and Security: The Role of the Law? Speaker: Ms. Monika Bickert, Head of Global Policy, Facebook Interviewer: Prof. David Hoffman, Intel Corp/Duke Law
    Monika Bickert | David Hoffman | Center on Law, Ethics and National Security | LENS Conference | Events
  • LENS 2018: Complexity & Security | Nita Farahany
    February 23, 2018 - Duke Law Prof. Nita Farahany discusses "The Legal and Ethical Complexity of Developing 'Super Soldiers'" during Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) annual national security conference, held on February 23–24, 2018 at Duke Law School. The 2018 LENS conference was titled "Complexity and Security: The Role of the Law?"
    Nita A. Farahany | Charles J. Dunlap | Center on Law, Ethics and National Security | LENS Conference | Events
  • Barak Richman | Stateless Commerce: The Diamond Network and the Persistence of Relational Exchange
    February 22, 2018 - Professor Barak D. Richman, Edgar P. and Elizabeth C. Bartlett Professor of Law and Business Administration, discusses his new book from Harvard University Press, "Stateless Commerce: The Diamond Network and the Persistence of Relational Exchange." Based on nearly 20 years of study and interviews, Richman takes an in-depth look at the diamond trade, examining the tight ethnic, social, and familial networks that make it "the paradigmatic example of a stateless economy." While the modern world rests heavily on lawyers, courts, and state coercion, ethnic merchants regularly sell goods and services by relying solely on familiarity, trust, and community enforcement. Professor Jack Knight, Frederic Cleaveland Professor of Law and Political Science, leads the discussion. Sponsored by the Goodson Law Library and Office of the Dean.
    Dean's Office | Jack Knight | Barak D. Richman | Goodson Law Library | Events
  • Duke Law | Dean's Cup Final Round 2018
    February 20, 2018 - The final round of this year's Dean's Cup, Duke's premier oral advocacy competition. Zack Ezor and Meredith Compton (for Petitioner) and Zach Ferguson and Will Sowers (for Respondent) argue Int'l Union of Operating Eng'rs Local 139 v. Schimel. The Honorable Pamela Harris, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, Amul Roger Thapar, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, and Srikanth Srinivasan, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit presided. Sponsored by the Duke Law Moot Court Board.
    Zack Ezor | Meredith Compton | Zach Ferguson | Will Sowers | Amul Roger Thapar | Srikanth Srinivasan | Pamela Harris | Dean's Office | Dean's Cup | Moot Courts | Moot Court Board | Events
  • Matthew Adler | Handbook of Well-Being and Public Policy
    February 13, 2018 - Professor Matthew Adler discusses his new Oxford Handbook co-edited with Marc Fleurbaey of Princeton University. The Handbook represents a definitive guide to research on individual well-being and on the existing and emerging tools for evaluating public policy in light of well-being. Contributions from internationally renowned economists and philosophers explore different methodologies for policymaking, from standard approaches such as cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and gross domestic product (GDP), to newer tools from emerging fields of research such as happiness studies. Sponsored by the Goodson Law Library and Office of the Dean.
    Matthew Adler | Goodson Law Library | Dean's Office | Events
  • Environmental Justice Symposium 2018 | Catherine Flowers, Keynote
    February 09, 2018 - On Feb. 9, 2018, the Duke Environmental Law & Policy Clinic held its first annual Environmental Justice Symposium, focusing on access to water and sanitation in underserved communities. Keynote speaker Catherine Flowers from the Alabama Center for Rural Enterprise discussed "Promoting Access to Environmental Justice in Rural Communities in the U.S." Introduction: Environmental Law & Policy Clinic Director Ryke Longest
    Catherine Flowers | Guy-Uriel Charles | Environmental Justice Symposium | Environmental Law and Policy Clinic | Lectures | Events
  • Environmental Justice Symposium 2018 | Access to Water and Sanitation in Underserved Communities
    February 09, 2018 - On Feb. 9, 2018, the Duke Environmental Law & Policy Clinic held its first annual Environmental Justice Symposium, focusing on access to water and sanitation in underserved communities. Panelists: Colin Bailey, Executive Director of the Environmental Justice Coalition for Water Catherine Flowers, Executive Director of the Alabama Center for Rural Enterprise Omega Wilson, President of the West End Revitalization Association Moderator: Jamie Cole, Environmental Justice, Air, and Materials Policy Manager for the North Carolina Conservation Network Introduction: Ryke Longest, Director the Duke's Environmental Law & Policy Clinic
    Colin Bailey | Omega Wilson | Cherri Foytlin | Jamie Cole | Environmental Law | Environmental Justice Symposium | Environmental Law and Policy Clinic | Events
  • Robert R. Wilson Lecture | Thavolia Glymph, "You will please let me know if we are free"
    February 07, 2018 - Thavolia Glymph, the John Hope Franklin Visiting Professor of American Legal History and a professor in the departments of History and African & African American Studies at Duke University gives the annual Robert R. Wilson Lecture titled, "'You will please let me know if we are free:' The Dissolution of Property Rights in Human Beings in War and the Bounds of Freedom." In August of 1864, Annie Davis wrote a letter to President Abraham Lincoln. She expressed her "desire to be free" and asked Lincoln to let her know if she was indeed free. Did her mistress still have a property right in her or could she leave and go where she pleased? Davis' query addressed a fundamental question: When did slavery end? This lecture explores that question - the indeterminate status of black people in the South - during the Civil War and after the passage of the 13th Amendment. Sponsored by the Office of the Dean.
    Robert R. Wilson Lecture | Lectures | Thavolia Glymph | Events
  • The Truth About Rendition and Torture: An Inquiry in North Carolina
    January 23, 2018 - Dr. Christina Cowger, coordinator of North Carolina Stop Torture Now , Catherine Read, Executive Director of the North Carolina Commission on the Inquiry of Torture (NCCIT), Professors Jim Coleman and Robin Kirk (both NCCIT Commissioners), and Professor Jayne Huckerby (an expert witness for, and advisor to, the NCCIT) discuss the work of the NCCIT, a non-governmental and state-level inquiry which recently held public hearings on North Carolina's role in the CIA's post-9/11 rendition, detention, and interrogation program. The speakers discuss the citizen-led efforts that led to the creation of the Commission, North Carolina's involvement, how the NCCIT aims to seek accountability, and next steps as Commissioners work towards issuing findings and recommendations. The talk was moderated by Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Senior Lecturing Fellow and Supervising Attorney of the Duke International Human Rights Clinic. This is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, co-sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic and Center for International and Comparative Law. This is also presented in collaboration with RightsWatch, a Duke Human Rights Center @ the Franklin Humanities Institute & Forum for Scholars & Publics series. Additional co-sponsors include the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Human Rights Law Society, and International Law Society.
    International Human Rights Clinic | Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute | Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics | Human Rights Law Society | International Law Society | Jayne Huckerby | James E. Coleman Jr. | Christina Cowger | Robin Kirk | Aya Fujimura-Fanselow | Center for International & Comparative Law | Events