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Watch the 2022 Duke Outstanding and Noteworthy (D.O.N.E.) Awards held April 22 and sponsored by the Duke Bar Association.

The D.O.N.E. Awards are an annual tradition at Duke Law to recognize the achievements and contributions of students, student organizations, faculty, and staff members to the Duke Law community. Awards will be given out for: Greatest Contribution to Civic Discourse (Organization), Greatest Role in Building Relationships (Organization), Greatest Service to the Outside Community (Organization), Outstanding Student Organization Leader (Student), Outstanding Contribution to the Duke Law Community (Student), as well as the Richard Lin Service Above Self Award (Student), the Distinguished Staff Member Award (Staff Member) and the Distinguished Teaching Award (Professor).

- This episode of the Duke Law Podcast spotlights the Law School’s Movement Lawyering Lab, in which students learn about how lawyers’ history of centering themselves in social justice movements often perpetuates a problematic system of racial and gender hierarchy and leaves little room for innovative problem-solving.

Speakers:
- Clinical Professor Anne Gordon (creator/instructor of the Movement Lawyering Lab) - https://law.duke.edu/fac/agordon
- Clinical Professor Jesse McCoy (moderator) - https://law.duke.edu/fac/mccoy
- Vanessa Keverenge JD/LLM ’23 - https://www.linkedin.com/in/vanessakeverenge/
- Evelyn Blanco ’23 - https://www.linkedin.com/in/evelyn-blanco-8a5651139/

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Listen to Duke Law Podcast:
- Apple Podcasts https://bit.ly/dukelawpodcastapple
- Spotify https://bit.ly/thedukelawpodcastspotify
- Google Podcasts https://bit.ly/dukelawpodcastgoogle

What do Dua Lipa, Katy Perry, Pharrell Williams, The Weeknd, and Ed Sheeran have in common? They have all been sued for copying melodies from other songs. Professor Jennifer Jenkins will unpack some of the legal complexities involved in such cases, and Damien Riehl will offer an innovative solution. Riehl is the co-founder of "All The Music," a project machine-generating 400 billion melodies with the goal of helping songwriters avoid unjust "you stole my melody" copyright-infringement suits. The project raises some fascinating issues, including the copyrightability of machine-generated works.

Sponsored by the Sports and Entertainment Law Society and the Intellectual Property Law Society.

Co-sponsored by Duke Bar Association.

As part of the Human Rights in Practice speaker series, join Benjamin Ballah, General Secretary, Cultivation of Users' Hope, Liberia, and Kriti Sharma, Human Rights Watch, in a discussion about the abuse of persons with psychosocial disabilities and their human rights. The conversation is moderated by Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Duke Law School. The event is organized by the Center for International and Comparative Law and the International Human Rights Clinic. Co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute; Duke's Kenan Institute for Ethics; the Health Justice Clinic; the Health Law Society; the Human Rights Law Society; and the International Law Society.

Please join us as Barton Beebe, the John M. Desmarais Professor of Intellectual Property Law at New York University, delivers the 2022 David L. Lange Lecture on Intellectual Property. Professor Beebe is a co-director of the Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy at NYU and the author of Trademark Law: An Open-Source Casebook, a free digital trademark law textbook now in use in 70 law schools around the world.

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean.

Recorded on March 31, 2022.

As part of the Human Rights in Practice speaker series, join us for a discussion of the human right to food. Our guests are Denisse Córdova Montes, Acting Associate Director, Human Rights Clinic & Lecturer in Law, University of Miami, Laura Leira, a student with the University of Miami School of Law Human Rights Clinic, and Ana María Suarez Franco, Accounting and Monitoring, FIAN International. Moderated by Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Duke Law School.

The event is organized by the Center for International and Comparative Law and the International Human Rights Clinic. Co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute; Duke's Kenan Institute for Ethics; Duke Law's Environmental Law and Policy Clinic; the Food Law Society; the Human Rights Law Society; the International Law Society; and the Sanford World Food Policy Center.

Join Professor Matthew Adler, Richard A. Horvitz Professor of Law and Professor of Economics, Philosophy and Public Policy, for a discussion of his recent book, Measuring Social Welfare: An Introduction. This title provides an overview of the social welfare function (SWF) framework and a demonstration of how it can be used as a powerful tool for evaluating governmental policies. James Boyle, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law, will provide introductory remarks.

Co-sponsored by the Goodson Law Library and Office of the Dean.

In this episode, Professor Marin K. Levy treats David F. Levi, director of the Duke’s Bolch Judicial Institute, to an inside look at her successful Twitter account. Levy’s engaging and insightful threads spotlight hidden gems from judicial history and little-known facts about the bench, including firsts for women and people of color.

Levy, a scholar of judicial administration and federal courts, shares how she's learning to navigate social media as a law professor and parent, the series of events that led to her growing popularity, and the unexpected community she's discovered online.

Professor Marin K. Levy - https://law.duke.edu/fac/levy/
Prof. Levy on Twitter - https://twitter.com/marinklevy
Professor David Levi - https://law.duke.edu/fac/levi/
Bolch Judicial Institute - https://judicialstudies.duke.edu/

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Listen to Duke Law Podcast:
- Apple Podcasts https://bit.ly/dukelawpodcastapple
- Spotify https://bit.ly/thedukelawpodcastspotify
- Google Podcasts https://bit.ly/dukelawpodcastgoogle

There is great interest across government, industry, and academia in improving the U.S. innovation system, particularly in light of competitive threats from countries like China. American universities have long been a foundation of U.S. leadership in science, technology, and innovation. As with other U.S. innovation institutions, however, universities face complex challenges. This conference aims to outline a new framework for America’s universities in the context of the country’s long-term competitive future.
Panel 3 Title: National Security and the Integrity of the Research Enterprise at U.S. Universities
David Fleshler, Case Western University
David Hoffman, Duke University
Rebecca Keiser, National Science Foundation
David Kris, Culpers Partners
Denis Simon, Duke University, moderator

Sponsored by the Center for Innovation Policy and co-sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, Duke Research and Innovation, and the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative

There is great interest across government, industry, and academia in improving the U.S. innovation system, particularly in light of competitive threats from countries like China. American universities have long been a foundation of U.S. leadership in science, technology, and innovation. As with other U.S. innovation institutions, however, universities face complex challenges. This conference aims to outline a new framework for America’s universities in the context of the country’s long-term competitive future.
Panel 4 Title: The Role of University-Industry Relationships in Universities’ Research Missions
Maryann Feldman, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Karl Koster, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
David Reese, AMGEN Inc.
Sandy Williams, Duke University
Arti Rai, Duke Law, moderator

Sponsored by the Center for Innovation Policy and co-sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, Duke Research and Innovation, and the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative

The Evolving Role of Universities in the American Innovation System
There is great interest across government, industry, and academia in improving the U.S. innovation system, particularly in light of competitive threats from countries like China. American universities have long been a foundation of U.S. leadership in science, technology, and innovation. As with other U.S. innovation institutions, however, universities face complex challenges. This conference aims to outline a new framework for America’s universities in the context of the country’s long-term competitive future.
Welcome and introduction, Arti Rai
Keynote, Michael Crow, President, Arizona State

Sponsored by the Center for Innovation Policy and co-sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, Duke Research and Innovation, and the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative

There is great interest across government, industry, and academia in improving the U.S. innovation system, particularly in light of competitive threats from countries like China. American universities have long been a foundation of U.S. leadership in science, technology, and innovation. As with other U.S. innovation institutions, however, universities face complex challenges. This conference aims to outline a new framework for America’s universities in the context of the country’s long-term competitive future.
Panel 2 Title: Immigration Policy and the Availability and Cultivation of Talent to Support U.S. Universities' Missions
Dany Bahar, Watson Institute for International & Public Affairs (Brown University)
Esther Brimmer, NAFSA: Association of International Educators
Richard Freeman, Harvard University and NBER
Caroline Wagner, The Ohio State University
Stuart Benjamin, Duke Law School, moderator

Sponsored by the Center for Innovation Policy and co-sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, Duke Research and Innovation, and the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative

There is great interest across government, industry, and academia in improving the U.S. innovation system, particularly in light of competitive threats from countries like China. American universities have long been a foundation of U.S. leadership in science, technology, and innovation. As with other U.S. innovation institutions, however, universities face complex challenges. This conference aims to outline a new framework for America’s universities in the context of the country’s long-term competitive future.
Panel 1 Title: The Future of the University in the U.S. Research and Innovation Ecosystem
Rebecca Blank, Chancellor, University of Wisconsin Madison
Shirley Ann Jackson, President, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Farnam Jahanian, President, Carnegie-Mellon University
Vincent Price, President, Duke University
Kerry Abrams, Dean, Duke Law School, moderator

Sponsored by the Center for Innovation Policy and co-sponsored by the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, Duke Research and Innovation, and the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative

Novel Justice is a book event series hosted by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. We invite authors to discuss recently published criminal justice books and to engage in Q&A with faculty and students. Dr. Jessica Simes is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University. Her work contributes to sociological research on racial inequality, mass incarceration, the conditions of prison confinement, and the social structure of cities. Her book, Punishing Places: The Geography of Mass Incarceration, applies a unique spatial analysis to mass incarceration in the United States. Join us for a conversation and Q&A with Simes about her work.

Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice.

Khanyo Farisé, panelist, Africa Advocacy Officer, OutRight Action International

Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, panelist, Clinical Professor of Law (Teaching) & Supervising Attorney, Duke Law International Human Rights Clinic

Amanda McRae, panelist, Director of United Nations Advocacy,Women Enabled International

Jayne Huckerby, moderator, Clinical Professor of Law & Director, Duke Law International Human Rights Clinic

Organized by the Center for International and Comparative Law and the International Human Rights Clinic. Co-sponsored by ACS; APALSA; BLSA; CAGV; Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute; DIRP; Duke's Kenan Institute for Ethics; Duke Law Children's Law Clinic; Duke Law Civil Justice Clinic; Duke Law Community Enterprise Clinic; Duke Law Environmental Law and Policy Clinic; Duke Law First Amendment Clinic; Duke Law Health Justice Clinic; Duke Law Immigrant Rights Clinic; ELS; FLS; HLS; HRLS; If/When/How; ILS; LALSA; NLG; MENALSA; NALSA; OutLaw; SALSA, and, WLSA.

Since 1995 the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) has hosted an annual national security law conference in Durham, N.C. The conference promotes education and discussion of the complex and diverse issues involved in national security, such as the legal and policy implications of counterterrorism operations at home and abroad, the international law of armed conflict, the impact of security issues on international business endeavors, and the ethical issues of the practice of national security law.

Speaker: Gen. Phil Breedlove, USAF (Ret.), former Supreme Allied Commander Europe (NATO)

Sponsored by Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS)

Symposium title: 27th Annual National Security Law Conference, Saturday, February 26, 2022

Since 1995 the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) has hosted an annual national security law conference in Durham, N.C. The conference promotes education and discussion of the complex and diverse issues involved in national security, such as the legal and policy implications of counterterrorism operations at home and abroad, the international law of armed conflict, the impact of security issues on international business endeavors, and the ethical issues of the practice of national security law.

Moderator: Prof. Shane Stansbury, Robinson Everett Distinguished Fellow, Duke Law School
Panelist 1: Prof. Lee Reiners, Executive Director, Duke Global Financial Markets Center
Panelist 2: Mr. Ari Redbord, TRM Labs
Panelist 3: Ms. Jessica Nye, Supervisory Special Agent, FBI Cyber Squad in Raleigh, NC
Sponsored by Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS)
Symposium title: 27th Annual National Security Law Conference, Friday, February 25, 2022

Since 1995 the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) has hosted an annual national security law conference in Durham, N.C. The conference promotes education and discussion of the complex and diverse issues involved in national security, such as the legal and policy implications of counterterrorism operations at home and abroad, the international law of armed conflict, the impact of security issues on international business endeavors, and the ethical issues of the practice of national security law.

Speaker: Prof. Mike Newton, Vanderbilt Law School
Sponsored by Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS)
Symposium title: 27th Annual National Security Law Conference, Friday, February 25, 2022

Since 1995 the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) has hosted an annual national security law conference in Durham, N.C. The conference promotes education and discussion of the complex and diverse issues involved in national security, such as the legal and policy implications of counterterrorism operations at home and abroad, the international law of armed conflict, the impact of security issues on international business endeavors, and the ethical issues of the practice of national security law.

Speaker: RADM Melissa Bert, USCG, Judge Advocate General and Chief Counsel, U.S. Coast Guard
Sponsored by Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS)
Symposium title: 27th Annual National Security Law Conference, Friday, February 25, 2022

Since 1995 the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) has hosted an annual national security law conference in Durham, N.C. The conference promotes education and discussion of the complex and diverse issues involved in national security, such as the legal and policy implications of counterterrorism operations at home and abroad, the international law of armed conflict, the impact of security issues on international business endeavors, and the ethical issues of the practice of national security law.

Speaker: Hon. Jeh Johnson, Partner, Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, LLP; Secretary of Homeland Security (2013-2017); General Counsel of the Department of Defense (2009-2012); General Counsel of the Department of the Air Force (1998-2001); Assistant U.S. Attorney, Southern District of New York (1989-1991)

Sponsored by Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS)

Symposium title: 27th Annual National Security Law Conference, Friday, February 25, 2022

Since 1995 the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) has hosted an annual national security law conference in Durham, N.C. The conference promotes education and discussion of the complex and diverse issues involved in national security, such as the legal and policy implications of counterterrorism operations at home and abroad, the international law of armed conflict, the impact of security issues on international business endeavors, and the ethical issues of the practice of national security law.

Discussants:
MAJ Rachel L. Walkup, USA, Brigade Judge Advocate for the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82d Airborne Division.
CPT Hayley J. Boyd, USA, Military Justice Advisor for the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82d Airborne Division.
Sponsored by Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS)
Symposium title: 27th Annual National Security Law Conference, Friday, February 25, 2022

Since 1995 the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) has hosted an annual national security law conference in Durham, N.C. The conference promotes education and discussion of the complex and diverse issues involved in national security, such as the legal and policy implications of counterterrorism operations at home and abroad, the international law of armed conflict, the impact of security issues on international business endeavors, and the ethical issues of the practice of national security law.

Speaker: Mr. Dean Cheng, Senior Research Fellow, Asian Studies Center, Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy
Sponsored by Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS)
Symposium title: 27th Annual National Security Law Conference, Friday, February 25, 2022

This year, Duke Law School celebrates Women's History Month by spotlighting women way pavers–like Jane Bolin, Sandra Day O'Connor, Genevieve Cline, and Meaza Ashenafi–who made history as some of the first women lawyers, jurists, and judges here in the U.S. and around the world.

Eric Tucker ’22 was the winner in the final round of the 2022 Dean’s Cup moot court competition held Feb. 22 at the Law School.

Tucker and fellow finalist Jenny N. Wheeler ’22 argued a fictional Supreme Court case challenging the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s 2019 expansion of the definition of “public charge” under the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Justice Goodwin Liu of the California Supreme Court, Justice Anita Earls of the North Carolina Supreme Court, and Judge Allison Jones Rushing ’07 of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit presided over the argument. Before announcing the winner, Liu praised the finalists for the quality of their oral advocacy.

Sponsored by the Moot Court Board and the Office of the Dean.

Read the story at: https://law.duke.edu/news/tucker-22-prevails-deans-cup-final

The Duke Law Journal’s Administrative Law Symposium strives to produce an annual commentary on each year’s major developments in the field of federal administrative law. The symposium reports and analyzes those developments which are of general significance, presenting in one volume a discussion of current controversial issues which should be of interest both to the infrequent agency practitioner and to the attorney or agency member who desires a cross-agency perspective on those issues. Because of both space and knowledge limitations, the symposium undertakes to give detailed attention to those issues which appear to be of greatest general interest.

Appearing: Jennalee Beazley (Duke Law Journal Vol. 71 Editor-in-Chief), welcome; Mason Marks (U. of New Hampshire Law/Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law), keynote speaker introduction;
Cass Sunstein (Robert Walmsley University Professor, Harvard Law School), keynote speaker.

Sponsored by the Duke Law Journal, the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

Symposium title: Automating the Administrative State

The Duke Law Journal’s Administrative Law Symposium strives to produce an annual commentary on each year’s major developments in the field of federal administrative law. The symposium reports and analyzes those developments which are of general significance, presenting in one volume a discussion of current controversial issues which should be of interest both to the infrequent agency practitioner and to the attorney or agency member who desires a cross-agency perspective on those issues. Because of both space and knowledge limitations, the symposium undertakes to give detailed attention to those issues which appear to be of greatest general interest.

Appearing: Edward W. Felten (Center for Information Technology Policy, Princeton), moderator ; Ryan Calo (U. of Washington Law), Hannah Bloch-Wehba (Texas A&M Law), and Cary Coglianese (Penn Law),, panelists.

Sponsored by the Duke Law Journal, the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

Symposium title: Automating the Administrative State

The Duke Law Journal’s Administrative Law Symposium strives to produce an annual commentary on each year’s major developments in the field of federal administrative law. The symposium reports and analyzes those developments which are of general significance, presenting in one volume a discussion of current controversial issues which should be of interest both to the infrequent agency practitioner and to the attorney or agency member who desires a cross-agency perspective on those issues. Because of both space and knowledge limitations, the symposium undertakes to give detailed attention to those issues which appear to be of greatest general interest.

Appearing: Arti K. Rai (Center for Innovation Policy, Duke Law), moderator ; Mason Marks (U. of New Hampshire Law/Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law), Catherine M. Sharkey (NYU Law), Alicia Solow-Niederman (Harvard Law), and Nikolas Guggenberger (Yale Law), panelists.

Sponsored by the Duke Law Journal, the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

Symposium title: Automating the Administrative State

Novel Justice is a book event series hosted by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. We invite authors to discuss recently published criminal justice books and to engage in Q&A with faculty and students. Tony Messenger is the metro columnist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. His book, Profit and Punishment: How America Criminalizes the Poor in the Name of Justice, is a call to arms, shining a light on a two-tiered system invisible to most Americans. Join us for a conversation and Q&A with Messenger about his work. Wilson Center Director Brandon Garrett will moderate.

Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice.

As part of the Human Rights in Practice speaker series, join Eva Okoth (Natural Justice), and Kristin Casper (Greenpeace International), for a discussion of the use of litigation and other legal strategies to secure human rights and climate and environmental justice in Kenya and around the world. The discussion is moderated by Monica Iyer (Duke Law School). The event is organized by the Center for International and Comparative Law and the International Human Rights Clinic. Co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute; the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics; the Environmental Law and Policy Clinic; the Environmental Law Society; the Human Rights Law Society; and the International Law Society.

Virginia is the most recent state to abolish the death penalty, but capital punishment is still authorized in 27 states, by the federal government and the U.S. military. There are numerous studies and advocates to point to why the death penalty should be abolished nationwide, but the people who are sentenced to death are the ones who can speak best about the true impact of such punishment. Join the Wilson Center for Science and Justice for a discussion with George Wilkerson, who is currently serving on death row in North Carolina, and Tessie Castillo, an international journalist specializing in criminal justice, drug policy, and social issues. The two were co-authors of the book, Crimson Letters, Voices from Death Row, which is a collection of personal essays from four incarcerated men, including Wilkerson. Wilson Center Executive Director Yvette Garcia Missri moderates, and the discussion is followed by Q&A.

Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice.

North Carolina Department of Justice Deputy General Counsel Daniel Mosteller and Senior Policy Counsel Steven Mange join the Wilson Center for Science and Justice to discuss the state of national litigation about opioids. In 2021 NC Attorney General Josh Stein announced a $26 billion settlement with opioid distributors and a manufacturer. Dr. Marvin Swartz moderates.
Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science & Justice.

Courts have become increasingly involved in overseeing the immigration policies announced by the President and his agencies. The result has been a dizzying array of on again, off again directives that raise fundamental questions about the obligations of the President as immigration prosecutor, the scope of his discretionary power, and the race to the courthouse in search of a sword or a shield. In this talk, Professor Evans discusses the implications of headlines grabbing cases involving Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the Travel Ban, Enforcement Priorities, and Border Policy. The session examines whether courts have abandoned the doctrine that afforded plenary power to the political branches to regulate immigration policy and what courts' divergent decisions mean for administrative policy-making and the integrity of the courts. Using recent immigration litigation as a backdrop, we explore the future of immigration policy and how those policies might fare in the courtroom.

Sponsored by the Duke Law Office of Alumni & Development.

For over a decade, Judge Leifman, Associate Administrative Judge in the Miami-Dade County Court, 11th Judicial Circuit of Florida, has worked with stakeholders to reform how the criminal legal system interacts with individuals with mental illnesses. With his colleagues he has developed a unique diversion model, the "Miami Model," that is a model for reducing violence, unnecessary arrests, and inappropriate incarceration among persons with mental illness. The model encourages recovery, reduces stigma, and gives individuals hope. In this panel discussion, Judge Leifman and Justin Volpe from his program will present their approach to diversion. Dr. Marvin Swartz moderates.

Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice

On January 1, 2022, copyrighted works from 1926 entered the US public domain, where they are free for all to copy, share, and build upon. The line-up this year is stunning. It includes books such as A. A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh, Felix Salten’s Bambi, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, Langston Hughes’ The Weary Blues, and Dorothy Parker’s Enough Rope. There are scores of silent films—including titles featuring Harold Lloyd, Buster Keaton, and Greta Garbo, famous Broadway songs, and well-known jazz standards. But that’s not all. In 2022 we got a bonus: an estimated 400,000 sound recordings from before 1923 entered the public domain too. This video celebrates some of this year’s highlights.

Sponsored by the Center for Study of the Public Domain.

The Center's Domain Day 2022 website: https://web.law.duke.edu/cspd/publicdomainday/2022/