Professor Donald L. Horowitz to receive 2009 EMNISA Distinguished Scholar Award

September 6, 2008Duke Law News

Sept. 3, 2008 — The Ethnicity, Nationalism and Migration section of the International Studies Association (EMNISA) will honor Professor Donald L. Horowitz at the Association’s 50th annual convention. The James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science, Horowitz will receive the 2009 EMNISA Distinguished Scholar Award for his contributions to the study of ethnicity, nationalism, and migration. He will also take part in a “Distinguished Scholar’s Panel” at the convention, to be held Feb. 15-18, 2009 in New York City.

“You present a clear example of excellence in all components of the tribute criteria,” wrote University of New Hampshire Professor Alynna Lyon, ENMISA past-chair and a member of the Distinguished Scholar Committee, in notifying Horowitz of the honor.

Horowitz has written extensively on the problems of divided societies and issues related to constitution building. His books include The Deadly Ethnic Riot (2001), Ethnic Groups in Conflict (1985; 2d ed. 2000), and A Democratic South Africa? Constitutional Engineering in a Divided Society (1991), and he has published an extensive study of Islamic law and the theory of legal change. He has consulted widely on institutions and policies that might be adopted to promote democracy and reduce ethnic strife in conflict areas throughout the world. Horowitz is a member of the Secretary of State’s bipartisan Advisory Committee on Democracy Promotion and is president of the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy.
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