5 Questions for Ellie Marranzini '13

April 12, 2013Duke Law News

Ellie Marranzini

Marranzini chose Duke Law because she could tell that the faculty and administration supported student initiatives and endeavors - particularly in public interest law.

 

1. Where is your hometown?

Jacksonville, FL

2. Why did you choose Duke Law?

I could tell that the faculty and administration supported student initiatives and endeavors - particularly in public interest law.

3. When you are not at school, how do you like to spend your time?

I spend a lot of time sitting in my backyard with my roommates and their dogs, doing yoga, reading, and travelling to visit friends. 

4. What’s the most recent book you read, and what did you think?

Crazy: America's Search Through America's Mental Health Madness by Pete Earley. It was a very interesting book and has furthered my interest in mental health law and criminal justice. 

5. What is your favorite Durham restaurant or activity and why?

I love the Geer Street/Fullsteam/Motorco area because of the dog-friendly, outdoor atmosphere, the food trucks, and the live music. 

Other News
  • Environmental Law and Policy Clinic comments on proposed international regulations for mining the ocean floor

    The Environmental Law and Policy Clinic weighed in on the first-ever regulations proposed for mineral exploitation of the ocean floor in June, emphasizing the need to protect deep-sea biodiversity and ecosystem function.  Little is known about life in the deep sea, a region scientists have only recently begun to explore, but discoveries over the past few years by Duke scientists and others have provided glimpses of an astonishing range of biodiversity — including unique life forms thriving in super-heated thermal vent environments. 

      
  • Susan Akers JD/MEM ’91

    After majoring in biology at Wake Forest University, Susan Akers broke new ground for Duke Law students by pairing her JD studies with the pursuit of a graduate degree in environmental management from the Duke School of Forestry and Environmental Studies (now called the Nicholas School of the Environment).