Humane Studies Fellowships

October 8, 2010Duke Law News

Fellowships of up to $15,000 for graduate or undergraduate study

Humane Studies Fellowships are awarded to graduate students and outstanding undergraduates planning academic careers with liberty-advancing research interests.

The fellowships are open to students in a range of fields, such as economics, philosophy, law, political science, anthropology, and literature.

The program began in 1983 as the Claude R. Lambe Fellowships, and in 2010 we awarded more than 180 fellowships ranging from $2,000 to $15,000.

Past fellows have researched a variety of topics that explore historical and contemporary ideas that maximize freedom of action and support the rule of law:
  • market-based approaches to environmental policy
  • the legal development of privacy and property rights in 18th-century England
  • the role of patient autonomy in bioethics
  • impediments to economic growth in developing countries
  • the relationship between U.S. presidential politics, fiscal policies, and economic performance
  • Review the research interests of the 2010 fellows

Research and Discussion Colloquia


Select winners are invited to present and discuss their research at the annual Research Colloquium and to attend the Friedrich Hayek Discussion Colloquium. Learn More

Fellows also join a network of more than 10,000 IHS academics committed to the ideas of liberty and intellectual freedom.

The deadline to apply for the 2011-12 Fellowships is December 31, 2010.

Award Details
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