Videos tagged with Communications Law

  • The FCC concluded the most complex auction in history, the culmination of a decade-long planning process for moving spectrum from broadcast to mobile broadband uses. On May 12, 2017, The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law held a half-day conference that identified lessons from this auction for spectrum policy, government disposition of assets (whether of spectrum or other resources), and the future of innovation policy generally. The conference was held at Duke in DC, 1201 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC.

  • A panel discussion featuring Duke Law Professors Stuart Benjamin and Chris H. Schroeder, Maryland Law Professor David Gray, and Intel Global Privacy Officer David A. Hoffman discussing recent dust-ups between the U.S. Department of Justice and tech firms like Microsoft and Apple. The panel considers the best legal arguments available to the parties in their respective cases, the role of the telecommunications and technology industry in the privacy debates, and implications for national security and international business interests.

  • A panel discusses regulatory approaches at Duke Law School's Center for Innovation Policy conference Friday, October 9, 2015, on the future of video competition and regulation.

    What metrics or modes of analysis should policymakers use to determine what sorts of regulatory decisions should be made in the near future, and which can and should await future developments? Which government entities should be involved? How long, if at all, should they wait to adopt that approach? Does Congress need to enact or revise legislation to allow for appropriate regulation?

  • William J. Baer, Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division, Department of Justice gives the keynote address for Duke Law School's Center for Innovation Policy conference Friday, October 9, 2015, discussing the future of video competition and regulation.

  • A panel discusses key policy questions at Duke Law School's Center for Innovation Policy conference Friday, October 9, 2015, on the future of video competition and regulation.

    In light of realistic future market developments, what are the key legal and economic questions for the future? What legal and policy decisions on the horizon will matter most to companies involved in video? How should we analyze marketplace developments in order to determine the appropriate policy responses? What, if any, role should the federal government play in regulating video competition?

  • U.S. Representative Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ), Ranking Member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee speaks at a conference hosted by Duke Law's Center for Innovation Policy, on Friday, October 9, 2015. This conference focused on the future of video competition. It built on changes in the marketplace as the universe of video providers, the forms of video programming, and the platforms used to distribute video have become more diverse.

  • A panel discusses industry structure & business models at Duke Law School's Center for Innovation Policy conference Friday, October 9, 2015, on the future of video competition and regulation.

    What are the most significant past and likely future changes in the forms of video programming and the platforms used to distribute video? Which business models show the greatest promise? Will video markets look different from Internet broadband markets, and will over-the-top video become a full competitor to current cable offerings?

  • The Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy (CIP) sponsored a conference on October 17, 2014 to discuss the future of internet regulation. In this address, Federal Communications Commission General Counsel Jonathan Sallett discusses "The Relationship Between Law and Competition: A New FCC Perspective."

    Speaker: Jonathan Sallet, General Counsel, Federal Communications Commission

  • The Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy (CIP) sponsored a conference on October 17, 2014 to discuss the future of internet regulation. This panel, moderated by CIP Co-Director Arti Rai, addresses the following questions: What are likely to be the most significant realistic changes in network architecture, capacity, and connectivity by 2020? In what ways might these developments be affected, perhaps even precluded, by regulatory policy? In what ways might these developments in turn affect regulatory policy?

  • The Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy (CIP) sponsored a conference on October 17, 2014 to discuss the future of internet regulation. This panel, moderated by CIP Co-Director Stuart Benjamin, addresses the following questions: What metrics or modes of analysis should policymakers use to determine what sorts of regulatory decisions should be made in the near future, and which can and should await future developments? How should policymakers balance regulatory certainty and flexibility in a manner that allows innovation to advance effectively and minimizes administrative costs and delays?

  • The Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy (CIP) sponsored a conference on October 17, 2014 to discuss the future of internet regulation. This panel, moderated by Northwestern Law School Professor James Speta, examines the following questions: Beyond the current pending mergers, what changes to the business of data delivery over the Internet are important and reasonably likely by 2020? What new categories of providers might arise, and which might diminish, with what consequences? How will these developments affect, and be affected by, regulatory policy?

  • The Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy (CIP) sponsored a conference on October 17, 2014 to discuss the future of internet regulation. This keynote address, given by Vinton G. Cerf, Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist for Google, Inc., discusses the Internet’s growth and future challenges. Introduction by CIP Co-Director Stuart Benjamin.

    Recorded on October 17, 2014

  • Robert M. McDowell, FCC Commissioner, addresses the rules that govern multiple ownership of TV stations, radio stations, cable providers, and cross-ownership of cable and broadcast.

    Recorded on February 19, 2007.

    Appearing: Robert M. McDowell (FCC Commissioner), speaker.