Videos tagged with Wrongful Convictions Clinic

  • Professor of the Practice James Coleman, director of the Duke Wrongful Convictions Clinic, and Clinical Professor Jamie Lau, supervising attorney for the clinic, talk about the clinic's work, how students get involved, the skills that students learn, and their favorite part about leading the clinic. The clinic investigates plausible claims of innocence made by people incarcerated for felonies in North Carolina.

  • Wrongful Convictions Clinic co-director, Professor James Coleman, discusses the "hot bench" advocates faced during Fourth Circuit’s en banc hearing of the Long case.

    Presented by the Duke Law Wrongful Convictions Clinic

    Appearing: James Coleman (Duke Law)
    Originally recorded on May 7, 2020.

  • Wrongful Convictions Clinic faculty thank students and supporters on their journey to Ronnie Long’s en banc hearing.

    Presented by the Duke Law Wrongful Convictions Clinic.

    Appearing: Jamie Lau (Duke Law), Theresa Newman (Duke Law) and James Coleman (Duke Law)
    Originally recorded on May 7, 2020.

  • Wrongful Convictions Clinic faculty discuss preparing to present Ronnie Long’s claim of innocence to full Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.

    Presented by the Duke Law Wrongful Convictions Clinic

    Appearing: Jamie Lau (Duke Law), Theresa Newman (Duke Law) and James Coleman (Duke Law)
    Originally recorded on May 7, 2020.

  • Wrongful Convictions Clinic faculty discuss possible next steps following en banc Fourth Circuit's ruling on May 7 hearing.

    Presented by the Duke Law Wrongful Convictions Clinic.

    Appearing: Jamie Lau (Duke Law), Theresa Newman (Duke Law) and James Coleman (Duke Law)
    Originally recorded on May 7, 2020.

  • Wrongful Convictions Clinic faculty react after “virtually” presenting Ronnie Long’s claim of innocence to full Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.

    Presented by the Duke Law Wrongful Convictions Clinic.

    Appearing: Jamie Lau (Duke Law), Theresa Newman (Duke Law) and James Coleman (Duke Law)
    Originally recorded on May 7, 2020.

  • Wrongful Convictions Clinic faculty discuss key argument supporting Long's innocence: investigators intentionally withheld exculpatory evidence in violation of his constitutional rights.

    Presented by the Duke Law Wrongful Convictions Clinic.

    Appearing: Jamie Lau (Duke Law), Theresa Newman (Duke Law) and James Coleman (Duke Law)
    Originally recorded on May 7, 2020.

  • The Wrongful Convictions Clinic addresses the challenges that the COVID-19 outbreak poses to their work and their clients’ health while in prison.

    Appearing: Shoshana Silverstein '20, Prof. Jamie Lau, and Nicole Wittstein '20.

  • Duke Law Professor Jamie Lau and two law students discuss the possible health risks associated with COVID-19 and Long’s incarceration in the North Carolina prison system.

    Appearing: Shoshana Silverstein '20, Prof. Jamie Lau, and Nicole Wittstein '20.

  • Clinical Professor Jamie Lau discusses the Wrongful Convictions Clinic’s requests for Long’s release pending while waiting for Fourth Circuit en banc review due to COVID-19.

  • Clinical Professor Jamie Lau, Long’s lead attorney in the Wrongful Convictions Clinic, shares his client’s reaction to hearing his case was granted en banc review by the full Fourth Circuit.

  • The Wrongful Convictions Clinic shares their thoughts on: ‘What is justice for Ronnie Long after serving 44 years in prison?'

    Appearing: Prof. Jamie Lau, Nicole Wittstein '20, and Shoshana Silverstein '20.

  • Clinical Professor Jamie Lau, lead attorney for Ronnie Long in the Wrongful Convictions Clinic and two law students discusses their path to being granted an en banc hearing before the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal.

    Appearing: Shoshana Silverstein '20, Prof. Jamie Lau, and Nicole Wittstein '20.

  • Shoshana Silverstein and Nicole Wittstein discuss the clinic’s strategy to persuade the full Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals to review Long’s appeal.

    Appearing: Nicole Wittstein '20, Shoshana Silverstein '20, and Prof. Jamie Lau.

  • What are the stakes when forensics go wrong? Keith Harward tells his story: he was exonerated by DNA testing, but spent 33 years in prison in Virginia for a murder he did not commit, based on multiple erroneous bite mark comparisons. Peter Neufeld, co-founder and co-director of the Innocence Project joins in the conversation. M. Chris Fabricant, who directs special litigation for the Innocence Project, moderates. Prof. Brandon Garrett introduces the panel.

  • Eyewitness testimony can be incredibly powerful in court. However, we now know that eyewitness memory is fragile and malleable. This panel, with leading scientists, lawyers, and judges, moderated by Professor Brandon Garrett, explores how eyewitness misidentifications can cause wrongful convictions. Panelists also discuss scientific research on improving the reliability of eyewitness identification, and how to address these questions in the courtroom. Panelists include: Judge Theodore McKee, U.S. Circuit Judge on the U.S.

  • Duke Law's Wrongful Convictions Clinic and the Innocence Project celebrated the hard-earned freedom of clinic client Howard Dudley. He was freed in early March 2016 after a judge ruled that he had no confidence in Dudley's 1992 trial. Dudley served 23 years in prison after his conviction for allegedly sexually assaulting his 9-year-old daughter. Additionally, the judge found that Dudley's daughter's recantation of the allegation was credible, and in fact no abuse occurred.

  • Wrongful Convictions Clinic student, Joe Wilson talks about the first time he felt like a lawyer.

  • On July 29, 2012, LaMonte Armstrong was released from prison after serving 17 years for a murder he didn't commit. His release might not have happened at all if not for the work of faculty, students and alumni of Duke Law's Wrongful Convictions Clinic.

    LaMonte's release was celebrated by his legal team, his friends, and his family - including a daughter born shortly before his conviction. Even after Duke Law became involved in LaMonte's case, it took many years - and the work of many successive teams of students - to achieve justice.

  • LaMonte Armstrong served 17 years in prison for a murder he did not commit. He was exonerated with the help of students, faculty, and alumni in Duke Law School's Wrongful Convictions Clinic.

  • Massey addresses the media about his incarceration and release, with Wrongful Convictions Clinic co-directors James Coleman and Theresa Newman and two students who worked on the case Kim Kisabeth '07 and Emily Sauter '09.

    Recorded on May 27, 2010.

    Appearing: Shawn Massey, James Coleman (Duke Law), Theresa Newman (Duke Law), Kim Kisabeth '07 and Emily Sauter '09.