Videos tagged with Criminal Justice

  • Novel Justice is a book event series hosted by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. We invite authors to discuss recently published criminal justice books and to engage in Q&A with faculty and students. Dr. Michael Walker is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. His book, Indefinite: Doing Time in Jail, is the first ethnographic study of an American jail in over 30 years and is based on his personal experience while incarcerated. Join us for a conversation and Q&A with Dr. Walker about his findings. Dr.

  • Novel Justice is a book event series sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. We invite authors to discuss recently published criminal justice books and to engage in Q&A with faculty and students. Chris Fabricant is the Director of Strategic Litigation at the Innocence Project. His book, Junk Science and the American Legal System, presents an insider's journey into the heart of a broken, racist system of justice and the role junk science plays in maintaining the status quo. Join us for a conversation and Q&A with Fabricant about his work.

  • Novel Justice is a book event series hosted by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. We invite authors to discuss recently published criminal justice books and to engage in Q&A with faculty and students. Tony Messenger is the metro columnist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. His book, Profit and Punishment: How America Criminalizes the Poor in the Name of Justice, is a call to arms, shining a light on a two-tiered system invisible to most Americans. Join us for a conversation and Q&A with Messenger about his work. Wilson Center Director Brandon Garrett will moderate.

  • Virginia is the most recent state to abolish the death penalty, but capital punishment is still authorized in 27 states, by the federal government and the U.S. military. There are numerous studies and advocates to point to why the death penalty should be abolished nationwide, but the people who are sentenced to death are the ones who can speak best about the true impact of such punishment.

  • For over a decade, Judge Leifman, Associate Administrative Judge in the Miami-Dade County Court, 11th Judicial Circuit of Florida, has worked with stakeholders to reform how the criminal legal system interacts with individuals with mental illnesses. With his colleagues he has developed a unique diversion model, the "Miami Model," that is a model for reducing violence, unnecessary arrests, and inappropriate incarceration among persons with mental illness. The model encourages recovery, reduces stigma, and gives individuals hope.

  • Novel Justice is a book event series hosted by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. We invite authors to discuss recently published criminal justice books and to engage in Q&A with faculty and students. Benjamin van Rooij writes about why people obey or break the law. Adam Fine, Ph.D., is a professor of criminology and criminal justice as well as law & behavioral sciences at Arizona State University.

  • Journalism is one of the most powerful mediums in storytelling, education and shining a light on systemic injustices. Criminal justice reporting, in particular, can be crucial to bridging a gap between those who have experienced the system and those who have not. Journalists covering this beat educate the masses about complex legal systems and processes, and often bring to the forefront underrepresented issues. Join us for a roundtable discussion with renowned journalists who cover the criminal legal system.

  • Novel Justice is a book event series hosted by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. We invite authors to discuss recently published criminal justice books and to engage in Q&A with faculty and students. David Sklansky is the Stanley Morrison Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and faculty co-director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center.

  • Brandon Garrett, the L. Neil Williams Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and Director of the Wilson Center for Science and Justice, discusses his recent book: "Autopsy of a Crime Lab Exposing the Flaws in Forensics." Sharia Mayfield discusses the myth of fingerprint infallibility.

    Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice.

  • Brandon Garrett, the L. Neil Williams Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and Director of the Wilson Center for Science and Justice, discusses his recent book: "Autopsy of a Crime Lab Exposing the Flaws in Forensics." Itiel Dror, a cognitive neuroscientist, discusses how bias affects forensics methods.

    Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice.

  • Brandon Garrett, the L. Neil Williams Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and Director of the Wilson Center for Science and Justice, discusses his recent book: "Autopsy of a Crime Lab Exposing the Flaws in Forensics." Keith Harward discusses his release after his wrongful conviction involving bad forensics.

    Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice.

  • Brandon Garrett, the L. Neil Williams Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and Director of the Wilson Center for Science and Justice, discusses his recent book: "Autopsy of a Crime Lab Exposing the Flaws in Forensics."

    Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice.

  • Duke Law Professor and Wilson Center Director Brandon Garrett's new book, Autopsy of a Crime Lab, Exposing the Flaws in Forensics, is the first to catalog the sources of error and the faulty science behind a range of well-known forensic evidence, from fingerprints and firearms to forensic algorithms.

  • Duke Law professor and Wilson Center Director Brandon Garrett and Sandra Guerra Thompson, professor of law and director of the Criminal Justice Institute at the University of Houston Law Center, discuss their work as independent monitors for a landmark bail reform settlement in Texas. This settlement could become a national model for cash bail reform. The discussion is followed by a Q & A.

    Sponsored by the Wilson Center for Science and Justice.

  • Seth W. Stoughton is an Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law and an Associate Professor (Affiliate) in the university's Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice. His book, Evaluating Police Uses of Force, explores a critical but largely overlooked facet of the difficult and controversial issues of police violence and accountability: how does society evaluate use-of-force incidents? This video records a conversation and following Q&A with Stoughton about his work. Wilson Center Director Brandon Garrett moderates.

  • Police have become the de facto first responders to behavioral health crises despite rarely receiving adequate training to safely and effectively handle the situation. The consequences of this are reflected in the disproportionate number of people with mental illnesses and substance use disorders killed by police every year and held in jails and prisons. A panel of experts - Dr. Tracie Keesee, Co-founder and Senior Vice President of Justice Initiatives at the Center for Policing Equity; Timothy Black, Director of Consulting for White Bird Clinic; and Christy E.