PUBLISHED:January 18, 2018

Gender and Transitional Justice: Challenges from the Field

Gender and Transitional Justice: Challenges from the FieldKelli Muddell Lecture 2/28/18

Wednesday, February 28
12:30 pm | Room 4047
Duke Law School

Please click here for the event webcast.

Kelli Muddell, Director of the Gender Justice Program at the International Center for Transitional Justice, will discuss trends in the field of transitional justice especially with respect to gender-based impacts of violations committed during conflict and under authoritarian regimes as well as how these impacts are addressed post-conflict. Drawing on examples from Nepal, Tunisia, and Sri Lanka, she will also discuss the importance of change in the field of transitional justice in order to better understand the structural inequalities that underlie the way in which gender plays out during conflict to ultimately ensure the non-recurrence of gendered human rights in post-conflict societies.

This talk will be moderated by Professor Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Senior Lecturing Fellow and Supervising Attorney of the Duke International Human Rights Clinic. This is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, which is co-sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic, and Center for International and Comparative Law. Additional co-sponsors include the Coalition Against Gendered Violence, Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, International Law Society, Human Rights Law Society, and Women Law Students Association.

Lunch will be provided.  For more information, please contact Ali Prince.

Biography

Kelli Muddell is Director of the Gender Justice Program (GJP) at the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ). Kelli has provided technical assistance to women’s groups and policymakers in over 15 countries on how transitional justice measures can address gender-based violence and are responsive to the gendered consequences of human rights violations. Kelli has conducted and overseen research projects which have contributed to expanding the way in which transitional justice as a field has conceptualized gender issues and conflict related harms. These topics have included sexual violence against men and boys and the gendered consequences of the crime of enforced disappearance. She has an M.A. in International Political Economy and Development with a concentration in Development Studies from Fordham University.