Videos tagged with International Law

  • The Center for International and Comparative Law welcomes Paul B. Stephan, the John C. Jeffries, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, to discuss his new book, "The World Crisis and International Law: The Knowledge Economy and the Battle for the Future." The speaker is introduced by Rachel Brewster.

  • Since 1995 the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) has hosted an annual national security law conference in Durham, N.C. The conference promotes education and discussion of the complex and diverse issues involved in national security, such as the legal and policy implications of counterterrorism operations at home and abroad, the international law of armed conflict, the impact of security issues on international business endeavors, and the ethical issues of the practice of national security law.

  • Since 1995 the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) has hosted an annual national security law conference in Durham, N.C. The conference promotes education and discussion of the complex and diverse issues involved in national security, such as the legal and policy implications of counterterrorism operations at home and abroad, the international law of armed conflict, the impact of security issues on international business endeavors, and the ethical issues of the practice of national security law.

  • In this episode of the Duke Law Podcast, Liz Wangu wa Makeri '16 stops by the booth following a lunch-time discussion at Duke Law, sharing her insights with students on pursuing a career in international project finance in today's legal market. Approaching her fifth year at Clifford Chance's D.C. office, Wangu is currently on secondment as a legal counsel at the International Finance Corporation, the private sector arm of the World Bank Group.

  • Numerous governments have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic by declaring states of
    emergency and restricting individual liberties protected by international law. However, many
    more states have adopted emergency measures than have formally derogated from human rights
    conventions. This discussion critically evaluates the existing system of human rights
    treaty derogations. It analyzes the system’s problems, identifies recent developments that have
    exacerbated these problems, and proposes a range of reforms in five areas—embeddedness,

  • In the first of a new series, the Bolch Judicial Institute honors Benjamin B. Ferencz, the last living Nuremberg trial prosecutor, as the inaugural Raphael Lemkin Rule of Law Guardian. Mr. Ferencz is interviewed here by David F. Levi, director of the Bolch Judicial Institute, and Michael P. Scharf '88, co-dean of the Case Western Reserve Law School and a Duke Law graduate.

  • Dr. Aurel Sari speaks about the phenomena of “Grey Zone” war where the adversary seeks to exploit ambiguities and uncertainties in the law.

    Conference section: Shortbursts II: Quick Updates on Hot Issues
    Topic: Grey Zone War

    Speaker: Dr. Aurel Sari, Associate Professor of Public International Law, Director of Exeter Centre for International Law (UK)

  • Cosette Creamer and Beth Simmons speak about their article "The Proof is in the Process: Self-Reporting under International Human Rights Treaties," which is published in the January 2020 issue of the American Journal of International Law.

    Sponsored by the American Journal of International Law.

  • Professor Curtis A. Bradley's discusses his recent book, The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Foreign Relations Law, a groundbreaking text in this relatively new field of study. Professor and contributing author Laurence R. Helfer provides introductory remarks.

    Co-sponsored by the Goodson Law Library and Office of the Dean.

  • Daniel Klaeren ’22 prevailed in the final round of the 2019 Jessup Cup international law moot court competition on Sept. 24. Klaeren squared off against Allyson Veile ’21, arguing a closed-universe international law problem before final round judges Professors Curtis Bradley, Laurence Helfer, and Jayne Huckerby.

    Sponsored by the Moot Court Board.

  • Kazuko Ito, the Secretary General of "Human Rights Now," a Japanese human rights NGO, will be speaking about the legal and advocacy work that her NGO has been doing surrounding the #MeToo movement in Japan. The program will be moderated by Professor Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Supervising Attorney for the International Human Rights Clinic. This event is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, organized by Duke Law's International Human Rights Clinic and the Center for International and Comparative Law.

  • The final round of the 2018 Jessup Cup moot court competition. Jessup Cup finalists Eric Roytman and Brent McKnight argued the case concerning the Egart and the Ibra before a mock International Court of Justice. The finalists were judged by a faculty panel including Professors Curtis Bradley, Jayne Huckerby, and Ralf Michaels."

    Recorded on September 24, 2018.

    Sponsored by the Moot Court Board

  • From the Human Rights in Practice Series: Samuel Moyn, Yale Law School, asks what is wrong with "forever war" - as the post-9/11 campaigns of the United States have been called. For a broad swath of critics, the trouble is its inhumanity - especially the peril it brings to civilians. What, however, if the opposite is true - and the problem is that the war on terror is the most humane war ever fought in history?

  • Professor Macarena Sáez, Faculty Director of the Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law and Fellow in International Legal Studies at American University Washington College of Law, and Professor Laurence R. Helfer , Harry R. Chadwick, Sr. Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Center for International and Comparative Law at Duke Law, give a talk titled "New Developments in LGBT Rights within the Inter-American System."

  • Kelli Muddell, Director of the Gender Justice Program at the International Center for Transitional Justice, discusses trends in the field of transitional justice especially with respect to gender-based impacts of violations committed during conflict and under authoritarian regimes as well as how these impacts are addressed post-conflict. This talk was moderated by Professor Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Senior Lecturing Fellow and Supervising Attorney of the Duke International Human Rights Clinic.

  • Professor Laurence Helfer and co-author Karen J. Alter discuss their new book, "Transplanting International Courts: Law & Politics of the Andean Tribunal of Justice," which provides a deep, systematic investigation of the most active and successful transplant of the European Court of Justice.

    Sponsored by the Goodson Law Library and Office of the Dean.

  • The spring Faculty Author Event celebrated a new book by co-authors Larry Helfer, Molly Land, Ruth Okediji and Jerome Reichman, "The World Blind Union Guide to the Marrakesh Treaty: Facilitating Access to Books for Print Disabled Individuals." The Marrakesh Treaty is a watershed new agreement situated at the intersection of intellectual property and human rights law. The Treaty creates mandatory exceptions to copyright to expand the availability of books and cultural materials in accessible formats to individuals with visual disabilities.

  • "Tightening the Purse Strings: What Countering Terrorism Financing Costs Gender Equality and Security" represents the culmination of research, interviews, surveys, and statistical analysis carried out by the International Human Rights Clinic at Duke Law and the Women Peacemakers Program (WPP) to begin to fill the gap in understanding how responses to terrorism and violent extremism may in practice squeeze women's rights and their defenders between terror and counter-terror.

  • Recent actions by the Trump administration raise many unresolved legal issues. Although much of the focus has been on the U.S. Constitution, many of these actions also raise challenging issues of international law. Executive orders on immigration and the "global gag rule" implicate human rights and refugee law. Plans to withdraw the U.S. from or renegotiate NAFTA and introduce a border adjustment tax affect international trade law. U.S.

  • Professor Curtis Bradley discusses the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA), which Congress recently passed into law after overriding President Obama's veto this past September. Professor Bradley addresses the potential diplomatic and legal consequences of the act as well as the context of sovereign immunity and U.S.-Saudi Arabia relations.

    Sponsored by the International Law Society

  • The Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law (DJCIL) hosted a symposium on the topic of “Internationalizing the Conflict of Laws Restatement” November 4–5, 2016 at Duke University School of Law. Sponsored by the American Law Institute.

    Panel 3—Specific Issues I: John Coyle (UNC) and Chris Whytock (Associate Reporter; UC Irvine), Chairs

    Jurisdiction: Linda Silberman (NYU)

    Party Autonomy: Richard Fentiman (Cambridge)

    Torts and Contracts: Patrick Borchers (Creighton)

  • The Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law (DJCIL) hosted a symposium on the topic of “Internationalizing the Conflict of Laws Restatement” November 4–5, 2016 at Duke University School of Law. Sponsored by the American Law Institute.

    Panel 4—Specific International Conflict-of-Laws Issues II: Kathryn Webb Bradley (Duke Law) & Laura E. Little (Associate Reporter; Temple), Chairs

    Family Law and Domestic Relations: Marriage and Divorce: Ann Laquer Estin (Iowa)

  • The Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law (DJCIL) hosted a symposium on the topic of “Internationalizing the Conflict of Laws Restatement” November 4–5, 2016 at Duke University School of Law. Sponsored by the American Law Institute.

    This video includes:

    Introduction and welcome from DJCIL Symposium Editor Laura Revolinski '17

    Opening remarks from Duke Law Dean David F. Levi

    Statement on "International and Comparative Aspects of Conflict of Laws," Duke Law Professor Ralf Michaels

  • The Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law (DJCIL) hosted a symposium on the topic of “Internationalizing the Conflict of Laws Restatement” November 4–5, 2016 at Duke University School of Law. Sponsored by the American Law Institute.

    Panel 2: International versus Interstate Conflicts: Ralf Michaels (Duke Law) and Kim Roosevelt (Reporter; Pennsylvania), (Chairs)

    Legislative Scope and the Presumption Against Extraterritoriality: Hannah Buxbaum (Indiana)

  • As part of a series of seminars entitled "Islamic State and International Law", this second seminar assesses the legality of the US-led coalition airstrikes against IS in Syria and Iraq, with a particular emphasis on the UN Security Council Resolution 2249, unanimously adopted on November 20, 2015.