Videos tagged with Trina Jones

  • Individuals across disciplines are speculating about the potential benefits and costs of generative AI. This type of speculation becomes particularly pressing when the interests of already vulnerable populations are implicated. This panel will examine the effects of generative AI on marginalized groups.

  • What is critical race theory, or 'CRT,' and why in the last few years did this decades old academic concept suddenly come under attack in the halls of Congress and local school board meetings? Three law professors whose expertise and scholarship are at the forefront of race and the law provide answers in this special two-part series of the Duke Law Podcast:

  • What is critical race theory, or 'CRT,' and why in the last few years did this decades old academic concept suddenly come under attack in the halls of Congress and local school board meetings? Three law professors whose expertise and scholarship are at the forefront of race and the law provide answers in this special two-part series of the Duke Law Podcast:

  • Professors H. Timothy Lovelace, Duke Law's John Hope Franklin Research Scholar and Professor of Law, and Trina Jones, Duke Law's Jerome M. Culp Distinguished Professor of Law, and Director of the Center on Law, Race, and Politics, have a discussion with Jerry W. Blackwell. Blackwell is a founding partner and chairman of Blackwell Burke P.A. in Minneapolis, and member of the special prosecutor team that successfully tried and convicted Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd.

  • Ian Haney Lopez, a racial justice scholar and the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Public Law at the University of California, Berkeley, spoke to students as part of Duke Law's "Race and the Law" course and speaker series. The course was offered during the 2021 spring semester and taught by Duke Law's Trina Jones, the Jerome M. Culp Professor of Law; Guy-Uriel Charles, the Edward and Ellen Schwarzman Professor of Law; and, H. Timothy Lovelace, Jr., the John Hope Franklin Research Scholar and Professor of Law.

  • The Duke Law Center on Law, Race and Politics hosts a panel that examines the pandemic's effects on marginalized populations and considers policy interventions designed to address structural inequality.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss Justice Gorsuch’s opinion.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Professor Trina Jones calls the decision “a glimmer of hope” in the midst of an assault on rights.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and James Coleman (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty share their reactions to the historic decision.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty share potential insights for students in the Supreme Court’s historic decision.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law).

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty reflect on how this ruling might strengthen claims for employment discrimination.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss Justice Gorsuch’s interpretation of the word ‘sex’ in this decision.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and James Coleman (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss implications of the ruling for current law and future constitutional challenges.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss marginalized persons that remain excluded from the ruling’s protections.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • On June 15, 2020, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Duke Law faculty discuss how the ruling might impact President Trump’s recent orders rolling back health care protections for transgender people.

    Appearing: Trina Jones (Duke Law), Carolyn McAllaster (Duke Law) and Ames Simmons (Duke Law)

    Originally recorded on June 18, 2020.

  • Professors Trina Jones, Thavolia Glymph, H. Jefferson Powell, and Neil Siegel give their perspectives on the historical and contemporary significance and implications of monuments as well as other symbols in the wake of recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia, and elsewhere.

    Sponsored by the Program in Public Law.

  • Duke Law's Center on Law, Race and Politics hosted a conference on November 20-21, 2015, bringing together scholars and experts to discuss civil rights. In 2014, the nation marked the fiftieth anniversary of the March on Washington, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and Freedom Summer. In 2015, we recognized the fiftieth anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Moving into the 21st century, America finds itself at the beginning of a new era defined by its own set of civil rights struggles.

  • A celebration of Black History Month with a panel discussion on influential Black attorneys who inspired the career paths of four Duke Law professors: Guy-Uriel Charles, Darrell A.H. Miller, Trina Jones, and James E. Coleman, Jr.

    Sponsored by the American Constitution Society.

  • The Present and Future of Civil Rights Movements: Race and Reform in 21st Century America

    Introduction: Trina Jones (Duke Law School) & Ana Apostoleris '16 (Duke Law School - Student)

    Plenary: Reflections on the Present and Future of Civil Rights Movements

    Moderator: Angela Onwuachi-Willig (University of Iowa College of Law)

  • Sparked by the Michael Brown shooting in Missouri, there is a renewed public discussion on troubled interactions between minorities and police. This panel, comprised of experts from various disciplines, offers observations and suggestions. Panelists include: Dr. Mark Anthony Neal, Professor of Black Popular Culture in the Department of African and African-American Studies at Duke University; Dr.

  • Professors Neil Siegel, Guy Charles, Trina Jones, and Darrell Miller discuss Fisher v. University of Texas, the affirmative action admissions case in which the U.S. Supreme Court recently granted certiorari. Brought to you by the Program in Public Law.

  • This groundbreaking Symposium will analyze two seemingly conflicting value systems in recent employment discrimination areas: one that prohibits stereotyping in the workplace, and another that uploades workplace appearance standards. Part 3. Session 4 with Trina Jones, Theresa Beiner, Martha Chamallas, Adrienne Davis, Barbara Flagg, Deborah Zalesne.

    Recorded on October 20, 2006.

    Panel titled: Sexual Harrassment.

    Conference title: Makeup, Identity Performance & Discrimination (Makeup, Identity Performance & Discrimination Symposium (2006))

  • This groundbreaking Symposium will analyze two seemingly conflicting value systems in recent employment discrimination areas: one that prohibits stereotyping in the workplace, and another that upholds workplace appearance standards.

    Recorded on October 20, 2006.

    Panel titled: Race, Sexual Orientation & Protected Classes.

    Conference title: Makeup, Identity Performance & Discrimination (Makeup, Identity Performance & Discrimination Symposium (2006))

  • Duke Law School pays tribute to the late Professor Jerome Culp, Jr., with a panel discussion on Reflections on Racial Justice. Introductory comments by Dean Katharine Bartlett ; speakers: Duke Law Faculty Trina Jones and Karla Holloway ; Frank Rudy Cooper (Suffolk University Law School) ; and William Darity (Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill)

    Recorded on February 13, 2006.