Videos tagged with Intellectual Property

  • Please join us as Rebecca Tushnet, the Frank Stanton Professor of the First Amendment at Harvard Law School, delivers the 2023 David L. Lange Lecture in Intellectual Property. After clerking for Chief Judge Edward R. Becker of the Third Circuit and Associate Justice David H. Souter on the Supreme Court, Professor Tushnet practiced intellectual property law at Debevoise & Plimpton before beginning teaching. Her publications include "Worth a Thousand Words: The Images of Copyright Law" (Harvard L. Rev. 2012); "Gone in 60 Milliseconds: Trademark Law and Cognitive Science" (Texas L. Rev.

  • This open coursebook is an introduction to intellectual property law, the set of private legal rights that allows individuals and corporations to control intangible creations and marks—from logos to novels to drug formulæ—and the exceptions and limitations that define those rights. It focuses on the three main forms of US federal intellectual property—trademark, copyright and patent—but many of the ideas discussed here apply far beyond those legal areas and far beyond the law of the United States.

  • While the artist Prince rocked fans for decades, an upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case concerning a 1981 portrait of him could potentially rock America's copyright law and fair use doctrine. 

  • In light of recent developments, The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law and the Sanford Cyber Policy Program are hosting a webinar featuring Peter Cleveland (TSMC) and Paul Triolo (Albright Stonebridge Group) discussing the evolving structure and operation of the supply chain for the semiconductor industry. The conversation is moderated by Denis Simon, Executive Director of the Center. Additional information can be found here: https://law.duke.edu/innovationpolicy/supplychain/.

  • What do Dua Lipa, Katy Perry, Pharrell Williams, The Weeknd, and Ed Sheeran have in common? They have all been sued for copying melodies from other songs. Professor Jennifer Jenkins will unpack some of the legal complexities involved in such cases, and Damien Riehl will offer an innovative solution. Riehl is the co-founder of "All The Music," a project machine-generating 400 billion melodies with the goal of helping songwriters avoid unjust "you stole my melody" copyright-infringement suits.

  • Please join us as Barton Beebe, the John M. Desmarais Professor of Intellectual Property Law at New York University, delivers the 2022 David L. Lange Lecture on Intellectual Property. Professor Beebe is a co-director of the Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy at NYU and the author of Trademark Law: An Open-Source Casebook, a free digital trademark law textbook now in use in 70 law schools around the world.

    Sponsored by the Office of the Dean.

    Recorded on March 31, 2022.

  • On January 1, 2022, copyrighted works from 1926 entered the US public domain, where they are free for all to copy, share, and build upon. The line-up this year is stunning. It includes books such as A. A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh, Felix Salten’s Bambi, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, Langston Hughes’ The Weary Blues, and Dorothy Parker’s Enough Rope. There are scores of silent films—including titles featuring Harold Lloyd, Buster Keaton, and Greta Garbo, famous Broadway songs, and well-known jazz standards. But that’s not all.

  • The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law's next "Conversations on Innovation: New Thinking and New Approaches" examines the ramifications of the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act (approved by the Senate and pending in the House) and the larger innovation and competition issues surrounding it. How will we know if the Act is achieving its goals? What else will need to be done to ensure the future competitiveness of the American economy? The program features Dr. Ronnie Chatterji, Chief Economist at the U.S.

  • Learn more at https://web.law.duke.edu/cspd/publicdomainday/2021/. #publicdomainday

    January 1, 2021 is Public Domain Day, when copyrighted works from 1925 be free for all to use and build upon. Find out what’s entering the public domain in the US, and why it matters.

  • Mark A. Lemley, the William H. Neukom Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and the Director of the Stanford Program in Law, Science and Technology, delivers the 2020 David L. Lange Lecture on Intellectual Property, "The Splinternet." Professor Lemley teaches intellectual property, patent law, trademark law, antitrust, the law of robotics and AI, video game law, and remedies.

  • Jerome H. Reichman, Bunyan S. Womble Professor of Law, discussed his book "Governing Digitally Integrated Genetic Resources, Data, and Literature: Global Intellectual Property Strategies for a Redesigned Microbial Research Commons." (Cambridge 2016). James Boyle, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law, provided introductory remarks.

    Sponsored by the Goodson Law Library and Office of the Dean.

  • Jessica Litman, the John F. Nickoll Professor of Law at the University of Michigan, delivered the 2018 David L. Lange Lecture in Intellectual Property, "Before and After the Copyright Wars." Prof. Litman is the author of "Digital Copyright," which traces the history of lobbying that led to the passage in 1998 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

  • Jonathan L. Zittrain, the George Bemis Professor of International Law and Director of the Law Library at Harvard Law School, delivers the annual David L. Lange Lecture in Intellectual Property Law (formerly named the Meredith and Kip Frey Lecture in Intellectual Property Law).

    His lecture was titled, "What Yesterday's Copyright Wars Teach Us About Today's Issues in AI."

  • Is Administrative Review of Granted Patents Constitutional?

  • Is Administrative Review of Granted Patents Constitutional?

  • A panel on Blockchain, smart contracts and their implications for the music industry and music copyright law. The panel features Jesse Grushack, founder of Blockchain-based music distribution platform Ujo Music, Nina Kilbride, Head of Legal Engineering at Monax Industries, and Professors Jennifer Jenkins (Law School) and Cam Harvey (Fuqua). The panelists discuss emerging Blockchain technologies and how their implementation in the music industry can solve various industry-wide problems.

    Co-sponsored by the Duke Law & Entrepreneurship Society and the Duke Blockchain Lab.

  • William W. Fisher, the WilmerHale Professor of Intellectual Property Law and Faculty Director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, delivered the annual David L. Lange Lecture in Intellectual Property Law (formerly named the Meredith and Kip Frey Lecture in Intellectual Property Law). Professor Fisher is the author of four books, including Promises to Keep: Technology, Law and the Future of Entertainment (Stanford University Press 2004), as well as numerous other publications on intellectual property law and American legal history.

  • A graphic novel covering 2000 years of musical borrowing and regulation, from Plato to rap, by James Boyle and Jennifer Jenkins. Available at https://law.duke.edu/musiccomic/

  • The Duke Law Journal hosted their 46th Annual Administrative Law Symposium on February 12, 2016. Experts from a range of disciplines discussed "Intellectual Property Exceptionalism in Administrative Law." The symposium assessed the impact and desirability of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's growing authority over intellectual property. Sponsored by Duke Law Journal.

    Session 2: Patent Office Cohorts

    Conference titled: Intellectual Property Exceptionalism in Administrative Law

  • The Duke Law Journal hosted their 46th Annual Administrative Law Symposium on February 12, 2016. Experts from a range of disciplines discussed "Intellectual Property Exceptionalism in Administrative Law." The symposium assessed the impact and desirability of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's growing authority over intellectual property. Sponsored by Duke Law Journal.

    Session 1: PTO & Chevron Deference

    Conference titled: Intellectual Property Exceptionalism in Administrative Law

  • Paul Goldstein, Stella W. and Ira S. Lillick Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, delivers the Annual Frey Lecture in Intellectual Property, entitled "The Americanization of Global Copyright Norms." A globally recognized expert on intellectual property law, Goldstein is the author of an influential four-volume treatise on U.S. copyright law and a one-volume treatise on international copyright law, as well as leading casebooks on intellectual property and international intellectual property.

  • Commentators: Chief Judge Paul R. Michel (ret.) ; Suzanne Michel ( Senior Patent Counsel, Google ) ; David L. Marcus (SVP, Deputy GC and Chief Patent Counsel, Comcast) ; and Laurie Self (VP and Counsel, Qualcomm).

    The Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy hosted a roundtable in Washington, D.C., on June 3, 2015. Experts from academia, government, and the private sector discussed and critiqued the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) process, instituted in 2012 as an alternative to costly district court litigation over patent validity.

  • United States Patent and Trademark Office Chief Economist Alan C. Marco discusses a study of patent litigation trials and how it affects patent quality.

    The Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy hosted a roundtable in Washington, D.C., on June 3, 2015. Experts from academia, government, and the private sector discussed and critiqued the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) process, instituted in 2012 as an alternative to costly district court litigation over patent validity.

  • Saurabh Vishnubhakat (Texas A&M) presents on his paper: What Ex Post Review Has Revealed About Patents (written with David Schwartz, Chicago-Kent Law School, and Alan C. Marco).

    The Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy hosted a roundtable in Washington, D.C., on June 3, 2015. Experts from academia, government, and the private sector discussed and critiqued the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) process, instituted in 2012 as an alternative to costly district court litigation over patent validity.

  • Shawn Ambwani (COO, Unified Patents) discusses his paper: Inter Partes Review, A Look at the Numbers (written with Brian Love, Santa Clara University Law School).

    The Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy hosted a roundtable in Washington, D.C., on June 3, 2015. Experts from academia, government, and the private sector discussed and critiqued the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) process, instituted in 2012 as an alternative to costly district court litigation over patent validity.